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 Posted:   Sep 22, 2022 - 8:54 AM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

And more from the article I linked to above, specifically focused on buying music:

After remarkable growth in 2021 following the COVID-razed 2020, sales of vinyl records continued to rise in the first half, with revenues up 22% to $570 million, as vinyl’s share of the physical market increased from 68% to 73%. “Music lovers clearly can't get enough of vinyl's warm sound and tangible connection to artists and labels have squarely met that demand with a steady stream of exclusives, special reissues, and beautifully crafted packages and discs,” Glazier said. Revenues from CDs fell 2% to $200 million and accounted for 26% of physical revenues.

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2022 - 9:40 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

It's not that their livelihoods are unsustainable, it's that they've lost one revenue stream. Admittedly, one that used to be big, but now is more like radio airplay - builds awareness but not direct income.

Live gigs and touring for artists at all levels is brings in the bulk of the money now. Across genres and formats. But there is a range of streams, including licensing, merchandising (vinyl for example), a bit of streaming, etc.

Also, Nicolai, I'm aware of a couple dozen new releases of Classical music every month, from Naxos, Chandos, Hyperion, Signum, LSO Live, Universal Music Group, Harmonia Mundi, and so on. Hyperion alone releases something over 40 new releases every year, and I believe they are all studio releases. That's hardly very, very few. (I work in Classical radio so this isn't just opinion.)


True, labels like Naxos, Hyperion, Harmonia Mundi etc, still do great releases (as they did 20 years ago). I am happy to hear you see the situation first hand less dire than I perhaps do. But as I said, there seem to be way less studio recordings. Most of the newer classical recordings, especially orchestral recordings, seem to be live rather than studio recording. (There are more live recordings that are released nowadays. Note: I'm not saying anything wrong with live recordings, I have lots of live recordings I enjoy. Just an observation, and it's obviously different. There used to be lots of orchestral studio recordings every year.)

And there are artists who never do concerts or are just studio performers (like even Glenn Gould in the later part of his career), so while concerts are great, it's not a "replacement" for recording revenue. Alas, I have yet to hear from a classical label that could sustain the costs of an orchestral recording through streaming.


And more from the article I linked to above, specifically focused on buying music:

After remarkable growth in 2021 following the COVID-razed 2020, sales of vinyl records continued to rise in the first half, with revenues up 22% to $570 million, as vinyl’s share of the physical market increased from 68% to 73%. “Music lovers clearly can't get enough of vinyl's warm sound and tangible connection to artists and labels have squarely met that demand with a steady stream of exclusives, special reissues, and beautifully crafted packages and discs,” Glazier said. Revenues from CDs fell 2% to $200 million and accounted for 26% of physical revenues.




Yes, but those are short term fluctuations, I don't see a growing trend towards buying music on physical media. Vinyl has been more or less stable for a while now. If you look at the larger canvas, "bought" music (regardless of Vinyl/CD or downloads) is on its way "down" or has reached a "low level" where it will float along for a while. It is "leased" music where the revenue now is. Streaming revenue is much higher. And that revenue "used" to be revenue differently distributed when people "bought" music, now it is usually going to the most played artists. That's why you can still make lots of money with pop music on streaming services, but very little with recordings of classical music.

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2022 - 9:49 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

Dp

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2022 - 9:56 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

The editing and/or censoring of films to protect or for “our modern sensibilities” is what really bugs me the most. The 1984 treatments. Good discussion points.

Yes, that is definitely terrifying. As if people are unable to judge something within the context of the time it was created.

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2022 - 10:28 AM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

Yes, but those are short term fluctuations, I don't see a growing trend towards buying music on physical media. Vinyl has been more or less stable for a while now. If you look at the larger canvas, "bought" music (regardless of Vinyl/CD or downloads) is on its way "down" or has reached a "low level" where it will float along for a while.

I'm just the messenger here, passing on the Inside Radio story.

As you will recall I have a whole thread about the decline of CDs and the growth of streaming, so you're preaching to the choir, baby!

https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=120591&forumID=1&archive=0

But it's still interesting that the vinyl market is a growing niche, even if in the long run it's not going to drive the bus, or a mini cooper, or a scooter, or a skateboard. Maybe a skateboard.

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2022 - 10:35 AM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

Yes, that is definitely terrifying. As if people are unable to judge something within the context of the time it was created.

Most people really are unable to judge something within the original context. Or choose not to go to the trouble. Otherwise you wouldn't see movies from ten years ago described as "old", for example (which you can see all the time on Amazon reviews, for instance).

This is not a defense of making changes, but just a reality check. As with so many aspects we discuss here, we're way outside the mainstream as collectors and aficionados. We few, we happy few.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2022 - 5:48 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Most of the newer classical recordings, especially orchestral recordings, seem to be live rather than studio recording.

I haven't noticed that at ALL, outside of labels that specifically release live recordings.....perhaps stuff by living composers (and even then it's hardly 'most'). I can think of one case in the last few years of something I bought that was live by a dead composer and that was on a label that specifically makes live recordings (LSO Live....so yeah) and it's only tangentially classical (Bernstein's Wonderful Town). If you take away the labels.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2022 - 4:24 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

I was just browsing Qobuz (and in double checked Spotify) and found that a lot of interesting music that is in my library is not available for streaming, and I am not talking about overly obscure stuff, but regular soundtrack releases like Morricone's MISSION TO MARS or Jerry Goldsmith's OUTLAND are not there. Lots of stuff I listen to is not available on streaming.

While doing some research, I came across this interesting article, which states, and it rings true, that one of the problems of streaming is actually that there is "too much" music. Of course, can there be "too much" of a good thing? Well, perhaps there can, if there is so much available, that individual titles have little (monetary) "value". Food for thought at least. Ironically, while there is really a lot of music that I would not be without not available for streaming (for various reasons), there is also the opinion that there is "too much" music as it is.

I want to point out that I don't really share the view expressed in the article, or at least do not come to the same conclusions, as there were always many more musicians, actors, screenwriters, book authors etc. than those that could actually make a (good) living from it, and streaming services enable just more musicians to be on there as well. But there are some good points to it.

https://rockthepigeon.com/2022/01/31/spotify-and-streaming-are-not-the-problem-too-much-music-is/

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2022 - 1:37 PM   
 By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

That's a really good piece, Nicolai - thanks for sharing!

The points made reflect the kinds of things I've heard in my professional capacity from artists, managers, event promoters and the like.

I love being an amateur musician, so I can write and play my music and don't have to do the stuff I don't want to do. But also don't expect a dime, or even 3 cents per listen.

 
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