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 Posted:   Jun 12, 2024 - 1:12 PM   
 By:   TacktheCobbler   (Member)

Not to criticize you or anything, Bob, but are you sure that production photo on your Usher post is actually from the production of Usher? I ask because Price’s wardrobe (coupled with the presence of his mustache and his hair being its normal color when the former was absent and the latter bleached in Usher) looks more like one of his costumes from Pit and the Pendulum.

Also, regarding the onscreen title for House of Usher, my DVD copy (paired with Pit and the Pendulum) uses the shortened “House of Usher” title, while later prints used the full “Fall of” title.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 12, 2024 - 11:39 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Not to criticize you or anything, Bob, but are you sure that production photo on your Usher post is actually from the production of Usher? I ask because Price’s wardrobe (coupled with the presence of his mustache and his hair being its normal color when the former was absent and the latter bleached in Usher) looks more like one of his costumes from Pit and the Pendulum.

Also, regarding the onscreen title for House of Usher, my DVD copy (paired with Pit and the Pendulum) uses the shortened “House of Usher” title, while later prints used the full “Fall of” title.



I believe you are correct on the photo. It appears to have been misplaced/misidentified in the IMDB. I've substituted another photo with Corman.

As for the title, it's anyone's guess as to whether the title changed on "later prints." One source says that both on-screen titles were originally in distribution at the same time in different "areas," and that later 16mm TV prints also sported either title. Whether they mean different areas of the U.S., or different English-speaking markets, I don't know. As for advertising, U.S. posters seem to have exclusively used the HOUSE OF USHER title, while UK posters exclusively used the FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER title. Perhaps that reflected the on-screen titles in their respective markets, perhaps not. It would appear that Orion/MGM had elements with both titles in their vault to draw on for their various video releases over the years (tape / laserdisc / DVD / Blu-ray). I've revised the wording in my write-up to better reflect the ambiguity.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2024 - 1:08 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

Not to criticize you or anything, Bob, but are you sure that production photo on your Usher post is actually from the production of Usher? I ask because Price’s wardrobe (coupled with the presence of his mustache and his hair being its normal color when the former was absent and the latter bleached in Usher) looks more like one of his costumes from Pit and the Pendulum.

Also, regarding the onscreen title for House of Usher, my DVD copy (paired with Pit and the Pendulum) uses the shortened “House of Usher” title, while later prints used the full “Fall of” title.



I believe you are correct on the photo. It appears to have been misplaced/misidentified in the IMDB. I've substituted another photo with Corman.


_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Bob, not to criticise you or anything, but are you sure that photo substitute actually includes Corman? I know the face of the chap on the right (actor perhaps?), but it's not Corman.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2024 - 4:20 AM   
 By:   Solium   (Member)




That’s one hell of a poster.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2024 - 1:24 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Bob, not to criticise you or anything, but are you sure that photo substitute actually includes Corman? I know the face of the chap on the right (actor perhaps?), but it's not Corman.


You win. Another source, more accurate I hope than the IMDB, says that the gentleman on the right is production designer Daniel Haller. Photo deleted.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2024 - 12:35 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS is set on Los Angeles’ skid row, where penny-pinching "Gravis Mushnik" (Mel Welles) owns a florist shop and employs sweet but simple "Audry Fulquard" (Jackie Joseph) and clumsy "Seymour Krelboin" (Jonathan Haze). Although the rundown shop gets little business, there are some repeat customers; for instance, "Mrs. Siddie Shiva" (Leola Wendorff) shops almost daily for flower arrangements for her many relatives’ funerals. Another regular customer is "Fouch" (Dick Miller), who eats the plants he buys for lunch. Soon, Seymour discovers that the strange plant he has been nurturing has an insatiable appetite for blood, forcing him to kill to feed it.

Roger Corman produced and directed this 1960 horror comedy. Reportedly, Corman’s inspiration for the film came when his brother and fellow producer Gene offered him the use of a storefront set and wagered that he would not be able to use it. Corman also gained access to sets that had been left standing from his previous film, A BUCKET OF BLOOD. Corman decided to use the sets in the last two days before they were torn down. Variety reported that the film was shot in two days in late December 1959, using two cameras and working from 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Corman stated in his autobiography that the film was shot between Christmas and New Year's Eve of 1959.

Another reason for the hasty, yearend production was that on January 1, 1960, new rules were to go into effect requiring producers to pay all actors residuals for all future releases of their work. This meant that Corman's B-movie business model would be permanently changed, and he would not be able to produce low-budget films in the same way. Before these rules went into effect, Corman decided to shoot one last film and scheduled it for the last week in December 1959.

Screenwriter Charles Griffith debuted as a second unit director to film exterior shots over two successive weekends, with $279 worth of rented equipment. Griffith paid a group of children five cents apiece to run out of a subway tunnel. They were also able to persuade winos to appear as extras for ten cents apiece. "The winos would get together, two or three of them, and buy pints of wine for themselves! We also had a couple of the winos act as ramrods—sort of like production assistants—and put them in charge of the other wino extras." Griffith asked his father Jack to play bit parts, and his grandmother, the former radio performer Myrtle Vail, played Seymour’s mother.

Actor Mel Welles stated that Corman "had two camera crews on the set—that's why the picture, from a cinematic standpoint, is really not very well done. The two camera crews were pointed in opposite directions so that we got both angles, and then other shots were 'picked up' to use in between, to make it flow. It was a pretty fixed set, and it was done sort of like a sitcom is done today, so it wasn't very difficult." Various sources have estimated the film’s budget to be between $22,000 and $100,000. Corman gave a figure of $30,000.

Composer Fred Katz explained that his music for the film was created by a music editor piecing together selections from other soundtracks that he had produced for Corman. In 1984, Rhino released an LP of Katz's jazz score for the film. Kritzerland released a re-ordered version on CD in 2010.

Corman had initial trouble finding distribution for the film, as some distributors, including American International Pictures (AIP), felt that the film would be interpreted as anti-Semitic, citing the characters of “Gravis Mushnick” and “Siddie Shiva.” The film was finally released by its production company, The Filmgroup, nine months after it had been completed.

THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS was screened out of competition at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival. A year later, AIP distributed the film as the B movie for their release of Mario Bava's BLACK SUNDAY. Despite being barely mentioned in advertising (it was only occasionally referred to as an "Added Attraction" to Bava's film), BLACK SUNDAY's critical and commercial success resulted in positive word of mouth responses to THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. The film was re-released again the following year in a double feature with LAST WOMAN ON EARTH.

Because Corman did not believe that THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS had much financial prospect after its initial theatrical run, he did not bother to copyright it, resulting in the film entering the public domain. But the film's popularity slowly grew with local television broadcasts throughout the 1960s and 1970s. For two decades, it also appeared at midnight showings on college campuses and in art houses, leading to its "cult" status. Interest in the film was again rekindled when an Off-Broadway stage musical adaptation by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman, called “Little Shop of Horrors,” was produced in 1982. It was based on the original film and was itself adapted to film as LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS in 1986. That film was directed by Frank Oz and starred Rick Moranis as Seymour and Steve Martin as Dr. Farb.

In 1986, Corman negotiated a licensing deal with Warner Bros., the studio that released the musical film version. The 1986 agreement stated that Corman could “put back his [original] film into the domestic theatrical marketplace six months after the new film was released" and that Warner Bros. would acquire certain rights to the property, including video rights to the 1960 film in 1991, following the expiration of Vestron Video’s video rights in that year. A March 1987 Billboard article reported that Corman threatened to sue public domain video suppliers of the film who refused to remove the black-and-white and colorized versions of the film from their catalogs.

 
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