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 Posted:   Jun 21, 2024 - 12:30 PM   
 By:   Sartoris   (Member)

What a moving timing......Totally unexpected.

 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2024 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   The Beach Bum   (Member)

The best score written for a Donald Sutherland film is Corigliano's Revolution (sorry, this one's not up for debate!)...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2024 - 1:30 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Have you seen the film for which he composed the score?

 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2024 - 2:55 PM   
 By:   The Beach Bum   (Member)

Have you seen the film for which he composed the score?

Yes. I sense what you're implying but whether the film is good or bad the score is outstanding.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2024 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   Hurdy Gurdy   (Member)

It's a very good score, but I think JFK and DON'T LOOK NOW and INSTINCT are better.
Probably FIRST GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY too.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2024 - 3:16 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Have you seen the film for which he composed the score?

Yes. I sense what you're implying but whether the film is good or bad the score is outstanding.


10-4. Mr. Sutherland was fine, as usual, in an otherwise boo-hiss role. This is from a post at this here m'board during lauch point annum 1998; like to think it captures the sporting spirit of your reply:

When Revolution came out 10 years ago, it bombed. BOMBED. The critics were quite correct in assaulting the "script" for its lack of exposition, coherency and overall state of being. As for Mr. Pacino's incomprehensible dialect...whatever. Since he's of the meticulous Method school, I'll give him the benefit of the doubt.

These negatives notwithstanding, this film is a visual stunner that carries a sustained mood, and Corigliano's score is suddenly a revelation. I can only describe it as Herrmannesque in terms of orchestration/ long 'chordality'/aural mood sustenance. He also creates a rousing number not unlike L. Rosenthal's Pegasus for Clash Of The Titans to underscore a cruel faux fox hunt.

Most of the score proper is in the first 1/2 -2/3 of the film. The rest of the film contains more period-sounding source music. Finally, Revolution--in a similar period-piece manner and of a similar period to Amistad--almost looks like it was filmed during the Revolutionary War. I think of the look as 'perpetually autumnal'.

 
 Posted:   Jun 22, 2024 - 8:27 AM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

It's a very good score, but I think JFK and DON'T LOOK NOW and INSTINCT are better.
Probably FIRST GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY too.


Gotta part ways with you on this one, Kev! wink

I personally think Revolution smokes those others -- yup, even the Goldsmith and Williams scores!

Revolution doesn't sound like the work of a film composer -- and I'm not knocking my Hollywood heroes, but because Corigliano isn't encumbered by the mindset of "this month's movie", he comes to scoring films with a fresh perspective.

Apart from Corigliano's considerable musical talent (which is the reason he gets concert commissions) his dramatic sensibilities are unique, and a little different from a film specialist.

Most others would have played up the harpsichords and fifes & drums in a movie set during the American Revolution -- not so the inventive Mr. Corigliano. Opening the film in such a distinctly modernistic fashion was extremely daring. Most film specialists would have tried to establish the period setting; Corigliano bypasses this and plays directly to the violent emotion of the sequence (since the viewer already knows the setting). Even the fox hunt cue is more 19th century than 18th.

Corigliano refrains from more typical "battle music" in the first confrontation between the British and ill-equipped American "army", he instead plays the tragedy of the sequence.

The spotting of the film is also unique -- as Howard L points out, it is heavily scored in its first half, and less so in the second. Some cues are under a minute long, others are in excess of five minutes.

There are three lengthy sequences (with little dialog) that allowed Corigliano to make broad, musical statements -- the battle sequence, the fox hunt and "Forest Search / Journey to the Hogan". Of course the structure of the film allowed him to be more expressive (not many movies offer this) -- but even so, the result is still the more unique score.

The battle cue was later adapted by the composer to form a significant portion of the first movement of his "Symphony #1" -- which won two Grammys, and suggests this music contained a significant level of "standalone" substance.

 
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