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 Posted:   May 21, 2007 - 1:35 AM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

Drat! Now I need a new disguise!

Thanks a lot, Howard.

That's my favorite seat in the house, because of the aisle behind it. You'd have to really be trying HARD to kick my chair. --A pet peeve, as I've already mentioned.

This afternoon it also offered the added advantage of hearing Mrs. Marvin's quiet chuckles (from back over my left shoulder) at her late husband's antics onscreen.

What were your thoughts, H? . . . And which one were you?

 
 
 Posted:   May 21, 2007 - 2:55 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

HA, so it was you! I was sitting exactly 3 seats directly behind you. 'S been a long time since we had the old FSTelepathy in play (Mr. Kinsinger, where are you?).smile

I spoke with Mrs. Marvin after the show, mostly about Lee's appearance in another Western, a moody 30-minutes of terrific TV called Twilight Zone's The Grave. She responded how much more she liked him in TZ's Steel because he got to get into the boxing ring.

The flick of this thread's subject was wonderful on the big screen, a crisp print that truly did justice to the panoramic setting/photography. The dialogue had more wit than in previous TV viewings, why I don't know but boy, I laughed. And Ms. Seberg's [lip-synched] delivery of A Million Miles Away was a revelation in Panavision. Her eyes were brimming with tears of passion and heartfelt joy(!) that moved me considerably.

 
 
 Posted:   May 21, 2007 - 6:46 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

..... And Ms. Seberg's [lip-synched] delivery of A Million Miles Away was a revelation in Panavision. Her eyes were brimming with tears of passion and heartfelt joy(!) that moved me considerably.....


Seberg was one of the best things about PAINT YOUR WAGON, and I always wondered why Hollywood couldn't find much for her to do. She was lovely and gave the film a very important anchor, I think.

It's been many years since I've seen the picture, but I remember the moment you speak of very well---and I've always particularly liked the song she "sings" which was added to the score by Previn.

I believe she was dubbed by Anita Gordon, who also did Pamela Tiffin's voice for "It Might As Well Be Spring" in the 1962 STATE FAIR.

 
 Posted:   May 21, 2007 - 11:32 PM   
 By:   SoundScope   (Member)

Ssssssssssssssssssssssss!

Saw PAINT YOUR WAGON in its roadshow engagement. Loved it then... appreciate it even more now!

As for Logan... have ALWAYS liked his film work as well. (I've tried to defend his "vision" in other posts to no measurable response other than dismissal.)

Arguments over subjective tastes involving the arts have become bothersome to me. I can, through such discussions, try to understand why a person may hold such a strong opinion and, hopefully, the same is true in reverse. However, in the end no one really ever changes their mind and the coversations usually end in a barrage of quips and attitude.

If I like something, that's all that matters to me.

 
 
 Posted:   May 22, 2007 - 12:09 AM   
 By:   The_Mark_of_Score-O   (Member)

And if I dislike something, that's all that matters to me.

Kind of like the mirror universe where Mr Spock has a goatee and eveyone aboard the Enterprise advances his career by assassinating his or her superior officers.

 
 Posted:   May 22, 2007 - 8:32 PM   
 By:   SoundScope   (Member)

My point, exactly.

(yawn)

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2007 - 2:57 AM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

I know it's short notice, and this might not be the right thread, (I don't know if it warrants its own thread on this board) but . . .

If anyone here lives in the New York area, and you're at all interested in Lerner & Loewe, you owe it to yourself to catch the "Musicals in Mufti" production of L&L's first non-failure (the show they wrote just before "Brigadoon"), "The Day Before Spring."

Here's an article about it:

http://www.playbill.com/news/article/109634.html

Unfortunately, only the Saturday night show is not yet sold out. You can get tickets online here:

http://www.theatermania.com/content/show.cfm/show/133328

Adventurous souls who showed up an hour before today's performance and got their names on the list were seated in no-shows' seats but also in extra chairs which were added on the sides of the theater, just for them.

Anyway, it's a terrific little production, if you live nearby and you've got tomorrow (Saturday, July 28th) evening off. Or if you live even closer, you can "chance it" at one of the already sold-out performances . . .

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2022 - 8:21 AM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

In the film, Clint Eastwood is singing “I Talk To The Trees”

Is that why he was so wooden?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2022 - 8:58 AM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

In the film, Clint Eastwood is singing “I Talk To The Trees”

Is that why he was so wooden?


I knew Nelson Riddle and we talked about Eastwood. He said CE took his singing lessons and rehearsals very seriously.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2022 - 1:17 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

In the film, Clint Eastwood is singing “I Talk To The Trees”

Is that why he was so wooden?


I knew Nelson Riddle and we talked about Eastwood. He said CE took his singing lessons and rehearsals very seriously.


Eastwood is wooden during the whole film. Thank god for Lee Marvin.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2022 - 1:52 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Another one of those films that I never wanted to see ... until I saw it. Probably my favourite musical since High Society (1956)

The album release (LP, now CD) is a popular play in this household smile

 
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