Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2007 - 2:08 PM   
 By:   scorechaser   (Member)

I really miss him. His humour, his wisdom, just his huamenly heart. His was a voice of reason.
He had intelligence, knowledge of the world. He was a TRUE world citizen.

He was so great...

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2007 - 3:30 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Yes, Philipp, there is a void isn't there? Out of curiousity, was there any particular 'thing or event' that made you feel this? What was the urge that made you realize his absence?
I enjoyed him in 'TOPKAPI' as well as one of his last performances in 'LORENZO'S OIL'.

 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2007 - 3:46 PM   
 By:   scorechaser   (Member)

Nothing special, really. I alway mourned his absenced, since he died, because he always made a huge impression on me, even when I was a kid. He was like the first role model I had.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2007 - 5:51 PM   
 By:   Gremlin from the Kremlin   (Member)





Pick up a copy of Sir Peter's autobiography, Dear Me. Hilarious, touching and wise, it will be as though he were speaking to you as an old friend, and soon, the book, itself, will seem like an old friend.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2007 - 6:57 PM   
 By:   Jim Cleveland   (Member)

Hey Avie...
doesn't that first picture you posted look an awful lot like Goldsmith?

 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2007 - 7:58 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

I've always enjoyed Peter Ustinov. His performance in Spartcus is excellent! I've always wanted to see that cruddy Charlie Chan movie he did because, if nothing else, watching him would surely be entertaining (there's only a fullscreen DVD of it as of yet). I also immensely enjoyed his Hercule Poirot films (Death on the Nile being the best), and he was very memorable in Lorenzo's Oil.

I remember him being hilarious in that wacky Beau Geste spoof in the seventies (was he the one with the wooden limb?). And hey...who can forget him in the Great Muppet Caper? smile

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2007 - 12:57 AM   
 By:   Gremlin from the Kremlin   (Member)

Hey Avie...doesn't that first picture you posted look an awful lot like Goldsmith?

You're just extrapolating the sight of a long, white ponytail behind his head.



I don't think he ever sported one himself but, Protean Renaissance Man that he was, Ustinov was probably capable of scoring a film that would've done Jerry proud.

Oddly, enough, despite their long careers, Ustinov's and Goldsmith's careers only converged once (if my memory doesn't fail me), with LOGAN'S RUN.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2020 - 12:11 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

The last few weeks, I've been on an Ustinov binge. He was tremendous.

Here he reads his autobigraphy - it's a great listen.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfixM63a5qI&t=10s

Here is an hour of Parkinson interview compilations. He's brilliant to watch and hear do impressions.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfxxEfdmn_Y

He even excelled while appearing on Swedish TV.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4inf0o616U&t=1746s

Such a brilliant storyteller and genuinely amazing chap.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 25, 2020 - 7:38 AM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

Ustinov was always brilliant when he rewrote other people’s lines. Reportedly, he wrote most of his scenes in SPARTACUS. I always loved his quip to the servant holding the umbrella over him, “The sun’s over there.”

But, curiously, the plays hecwrote, though often produced, were whimsical comedies, but mostly flat: “Romanoff and Juliet,” “The Love of Four Colonels,” “The Unknown Soldier and His Wife,” and one I actually saw, “Halfway Up the Tree.” This was about a man who, fed up with life, decides to spend his remaining years, literally up in a tree next to his house, with numerous ensuing family issues. Whimsical, but contrived, something more suited to a TV movie.

But I’ll always remember him in his films in the early 50’s. He once observed that, as his roles evolved from emperor in QUO VADIS, to king in BEAU BRUMMEL, he was treated like royalty by the crew, until he played the slave, Kaptah, in THE EGYPTIAN, where the crew was more likely to treat him like the outcast his character was. Clothes make the man, I guess.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 25, 2020 - 11:30 AM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

Hey Avie...doesn't that first picture you posted look an awful lot like Goldsmith?

You're just extrapolating the sight of a long, white ponytail behind his head.



I don't think he ever sported one himself but, Protean Renaissance Man that he was, Ustinov was probably capable of scoring a film that would've done Jerry proud.

Oddly, enough, despite their long careers, Ustinov's and Goldsmith's careers only converged once (if my memory doesn't fail me), with LOGAN'S RUN.



OLLLLLLLLLLD MANNNNNN!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2020 - 3:12 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

He got on well with Miklos Rozsa, and the composer dedicated his First String Quartet to him. But Rozsa seldom heard from Ustinov afterward.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2020 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved...