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 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 5:14 PM   
 By:   ShelfLife   (Member)

I find that Masaru Satoh is incredibly underrated. His score for Yojimbo is incredibly influential, and was written and recorded in a week!

Anybody else consider him one of the overlooked greats?
Listen to his Hidden Fortress score.

Listen to YOJIMBO tracks here:
http://www.dinosaurgardens.com/archives/22

 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 5:40 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Satoh is on the short list of my all-time favorite composers, and is definitely my favorite Japanese composer. Highlights for me include his scores for Godzilla films, samurai films, and especially Akira Kurosawa's films...all are amazing and highly recommended (click on the links above each pic below for more details about each CD).

http://www.godzillamonstermusic.com/MS01.htm


http://www.godzillamonstermusic.com/MS04.htm


http://www.godzillamonstermusic.com/MS13.htm

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 5:55 PM   
 By:   IloveJerry   (Member)

I like Satoh. I would say he was the Japanese Morricone. He wrote great themes- His Kambe (Mifune) theme in Hidden fortress is one of the most heroic and memorable themes in movies.

Yes he is under rated- only because, untill now, you couldn't find his music. I think the Kurosawa box sets just came out in the last couple of years.


I just bought the AKIRA KUROSAWA box set with Hidden Fortress and Throne of Blood. Whew- I dont know why I put it off for so long

The sound and music on these cds is really good- I would recommend them highly. Id get them before you have to pay $300 on ebay. Craig is the only one that has them.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 5:55 PM   
 By:   Squiddybop   (Member)

Satoh's not my favorite Japanese composer, but I'd hardly consider him underrated. There's even been something of a Satoh resurgence over the last couple years in Japan it seems, both in new CD releases of his music, as well as remakes of films and shows he scored the original versions of.

My favorite Satoh score is the one he wrote for the anime Toward the Terra, which got a pretty nice 2 disc release earlier this year.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 6:10 PM   
 By:   ShelfLife   (Member)

I love his score for the movie KILL! - I need to pick up volume 1 of that Satoh series, I only have #13. I have all of his Godzilla scores.

I say underrated because I don't think his influence on the spaghetti western scores is really stated enough!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 6:18 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

It took me awhile. At first Satoh was too reminiscent of both Ifukube on the Godzilla side and Fumio Hayasaka on the Kurosawa side. But I found out that was respect for those predecessors and the ability to write in a number of styles that was making itself known. Thanks to the late Yasuhiro Wada and his series that you see examples of in American Nightmare's reply I found a guy with incredible talent that exceeded those two previously mentioned in range.

I do think his Kurosawa and Godilla scores are overrated for the above reasons. But he did so much more than that and worked till his death in 1999. Yeah, one of my favorites from that part of the world.

 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 6:21 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

I love his score for the movie KILL! - I need to pick up volume 1 of that Satoh series...

Here's the track listing of that CD (with track lengths). Unfortunately the track from KILL is quite short, but still great! Hopefully someday it'll get a complete CD release. My apologies for the blurry photo.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 6:22 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Big fan here - especially his brilliant score to High and Low, my favorite Kurosawa film.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 26, 2007 - 6:29 PM   
 By:   Squiddybop   (Member)

Does anyone know if there's ever been a CD release that features more than just the main title of his score to San Shimai?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2007 - 2:57 AM   
 By:   Starkbier   (Member)

Wonderful composer all the way, I discoverd him through Criterion's great editions of Yojimbo and Sanjuro. I found it fascinating to hear a sixties swinging, brassy action score written years before John Barry rose to fame with stuff like this.

Fumio Hayasaka is another and maybe even more impressive composer, his work for Mizoguchi's Ugestu and Sansho the Bailiff or Kurosawa's Igetsu and Seven Samurai is brilliant.

If I won the lottery I'd produce rerecordings of these landmark compositions.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2007 - 3:24 PM   
 By:   ShelfLife   (Member)

Wonderful composer all the way, I discoverd him through Criterion's great editions of Yojimbo and Sanjuro. I found it fascinating to hear a sixties swinging, brassy action score written years before John Barry rose to fame with stuff like this.

Fumio Hayasaka is another and maybe even more impressive composer, his work for Mizoguchi's Ugestu and Sansho the Bailiff or Kurosawa's Igetsu and Seven Samurai is brilliant.

If I won the lottery I'd produce rerecordings of these landmark compositions.


I should buy you a lottery ticket.

It's amazing that Hayasaka passed away so early in his Kurosawa collaboration and that his student took over and created score that were every bit the equal of, if not (arguably) better than, his master's.

You voiced my opinion exactly, that Satoh was composing the type of sixties swinging, brassy action scores with unusual instrumentation in 1961 that Barry and Morricone built a genre on.

The reason for the spare, brassy, percussive sound was most likely the time constraint. Satoh supposedly had a WEEK to compose and record the entire Yojimbo score. In a similar race with time, John Barry had to scrap his written music for the raid on Fort Knox scene in Goldfinger when Guy Hamilton rejected it, and actually wrote the music used in the film during the recording session- the result was a brassy, percussive tense spare track that is actually very similar in style to the YOJIMBO score.

Thank short deadlines for the amazing sound! wink

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2007 - 8:10 PM   
 By:   dashrr   (Member)


You guys know nothing about film music! Everyone knows that Sato's greatest score is from THE H-MAN with that other worldly innovative Saw theremin!

 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2007 - 9:49 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

You guys know nothing about film music! Everyone knows that Sato's greatest score is from THE H-MAN with that other worldly innovative Saw theremin!

I've been wanting to get ahold of that CD for quite some time...if anyone has a copy for sale/trade or knows where I can buy one, PLEASE LET ME KNOW! (my e-mail address is in my profile).

 
 Posted:   Apr 10, 2018 - 10:14 PM   
 By:   Saul Pincus   (Member)

I found it fascinating to hear a sixties swinging, brassy action score written years before John Barry rose to fame with stuff like this.

Exactly. I'm only just discovering his vast body of work outside his work for Kurosawa, and it's balls-to-the-wall amazing.

 
 Posted:   Apr 11, 2018 - 6:23 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

Satoh is definitely one of my favorites.
"Son Of Godzilla" (I know, I know) is a wonderful work!
Listen to it apart from the movie and see if you don't agree. Some of his scoring brings to mind Leonard Bernstein for me.

 
 Posted:   Apr 11, 2018 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   Saul Pincus   (Member)

Satoh is definitely one of my favorites.
"Son Of Godzilla" (I know, I know) is a wonderful work!
Listen to it apart from the movie and see if you don't agree. Some of his scoring brings to mind Leonard Bernstein for me.


Jackfu, might I inquire which Godzilla Perfect Collection box(es) you'd recommend for prime Satoh (in addition to the one featuring Son of Godzilla)? I'm also exploring Ifukube, incidentally.

 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2018 - 12:24 PM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

Masaru Sato is definitely one of my favorite composers. I especially enjoy his earlier works such as "Godzilla Raids Again", "Half Human" (both 1955) and "Throne of Blood" (1957). My favorite score of his is Akira Kurosawa's "Red Beard" (1965).

 
 Posted:   May 3, 2021 - 8:55 PM   
 By:   increbula   (Member)

I'm reviving this thread because I'm in the midst of revisiting "The Film Music of Masaru Satoh" series (1992-93) on the late, lamented SLC label. I'm guilty of underrating Satoh myself, if only because I more frequently gravitate towards Akira Ifukube's monumental output. But Satoh's scores are dazzling in their richness and diversity, and it's a shame this ambitious collection is no longer available.

Despite the varied sources, the sound quality of this series is consistently good, and it offers an excellent overview of the composer's film work.



 
 Posted:   May 4, 2021 - 10:42 AM   
 By:   Ostinato   (Member)

I had the opportunity to listen to many of those albums increbula posted. Unfortunately, almost everything on those albums were hit-and-miss for me. Some of the score selections were great, whereas other didn't gel well with me at all. Sato is a favorite composer of mine, but is pretty hit-and-miss with me. This is primarily due to the jazzy big band style of music he would often employ, which is a music style I'm not a fan of.

Thankfully, quite the number of scores that have selections on those albums have had proper releases over the years and I have quite a few of them now. There are releases of scores such as "Desperado Outpost" and "Westward Desperado" which I don't care for and won't plan on buying any time soon. I'm sure the release of those particular scores is great (they were released by Cinema-kan as a two disc set), it's that I don't care for the scores themselves.

One recent release I was thrilled with is Three Shells' "Men and War" set. Those three scores are among Sato's best.

 
 Posted:   May 4, 2021 - 3:48 PM   
 By:   increbula   (Member)

Sato is a favorite composer of mine, but is pretty hit-and-miss with me. This is primarily due to the jazzy big band style of music he would often employ, which is a music style I'm not a fan of.


Of course it's a matter of personal taste, but I love the jazzy feel of many of Satoh's scores. They are on easily on par with the work that Barry, Schifrin or Morricone produced during the same era, but are arguably even more eclectic.

 
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