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 Posted:   May 23, 2008 - 11:21 PM   
 By:   SheriffJoe   (Member)

Gordon Jenkins is better known as an arranger for Frnak Sinatra and Nat King Cole, among others.

However, I just finished watching the Sinatra vehicle FIRST DEADLY SIN and noticed that he also scored that film (Sinatra was not only the star, but an executive producer of the film, hence Jenkin's assignments, no doubt). The music was quite lovely, with lush string work (which he was known for, apparently). So, here are my questions:

Was there ever a score release for First Deadly Sin? If not (or even if there was, are the masters available for a potential FSM (or other indie production outlet) release? Did Jenkins compose other scores to anyone's knowledge?

Inquiring minds wanna know! smile Thank you!

SheriffJoe

 
 
 Posted:   May 23, 2008 - 11:32 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

The only thing I know he scored was one of the first major 3-D movies for Arch Oboler, BWANA DEVIL.

 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 4:14 AM   
 By:   calvin69   (Member)

No film score releases by him, but there is a fine double CD with his symphonic poems (all with narrator and songs, however).

Manhattan Tower (both versions)
California
Seven Dreams

Cantus Classics CACD 5.00997 F

2007

 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 4:52 AM   
 By:   shicorp   (Member)

I never found a soundtrack album by Jenkins, but there was a nice two-fer of his arrangements on Collectors' Choice and a Hawaiian-themed album is (or was?) available as a Japanese import...

 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 11:19 AM   
 By:   SheriffJoe   (Member)

Thanks for the input guys! I think this would be a lovely little score to bring onto disc. Aside from being Sinatra's last acting performance, it also showcased David Dukes as the psychopath (he was quite good in his one major scene with Sinatra) and is also noted for having Faye Dunaway in a role in which she never got off her back...literally. I hear actors hate playing coma as it limits their range, but at least she had some good dialogue while she was awake (aside from her WAY OVER THE TOP scene where she's in pain and trying to get out of the hospital bed) and allowed Sinatra to show that he really COULD act as well as sing.

My one major critique of this film is that I felt the editing was horrible...but that's just the filmmaker in me. The score, however, was lovely. I hope it can find a release some day!

Joe

 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 12:17 PM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Thanks for the input guys! I think this would be a lovely little score to bring onto disc. Aside from being Sinatra's last acting performance, it also showcased David Dukes as the psychopath (he was quite good in his one major scene with Sinatra) and is also noted for having Faye Dunaway in a role in which she never got off her back...literally. I hear actors hate playing coma as it limits their range, but at least she had some good dialogue while she was awake (aside from her WAY OVER THE TOP scene where she's in pain and trying to get out of the hospital bed) and allowed Sinatra to show that he really COULD act as well as sing.

My one major critique of this film is that I felt the editing was horrible...but that's just the filmmaker in me. The score, however, was lovely. I hope it can find a release some day!

Joe


I remember going tos ee this film at the cinema upon its release ... I found it very dour. Having now seen other Frank Sinatra detective films - such as The Detective and Contract On Cherry Street, he did seem to corner the market in that role!

I know it's not film music but I can highly recommend the albums Gordon Jenkins worked on with Frank Sinatra ... the arrangements are so utterly beautiful. My favourite is Where Are You? which includes an achingly beautiful recording of Lonely Town from Leonard Bernstein's On The Town - omitted from the film version.

 
 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 5:08 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Jenkins was never better than when paired with Sinatra. The two best are the Capitol LPs "Where are You" and "No One Cares."

 
 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 5:57 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

Every Capitol Sinatra album, whether arranged by Jenkins, Riddle, or Billy May, is a classic in its own way. Even the later ones, such as the weary-sounding POINT OF NO RETURN and the brisk SINATRA'S SWINGIN' SESSION, are superb. Nobody seems to mention NO ONE CARES that much, but it's a brilliant album. Jenkins' arrangements for the 1957 Sinatra Christmas album are excellent as well. "Jingle Bells" with those squeaky strings never failing to entertain.

Another Capitol vocalist, Nat King Cole, also used Jenkins as an arranger, and Cole's famous Christmas album was arranged and conducted by Ralph Carmichael, best known to film music fans as the composer of the score for THE BLOB.

 
 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 6:40 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Every Capitol Sinatra album, whether arranged by Jenkins, Riddle, or Billy May, is a classic in its own way. Even the later ones, such as the weary-sounding POINT OF NO RETURN and the brisk SINATRA'S SWINGIN' SESSION, are superb. Nobody seems to mention NO ONE CARES that much, but it's a brilliant album. Jenkins' arrangements for the 1957 Sinatra Christmas album are excellent as well. "Jingle Bells" with those squeaky strings never failing to entertain.

Another Capitol vocalist, Nat King Cole, also used Jenkins as an arranger, and Cole's famous Christmas album was arranged and conducted by Ralph Carmichael, best known to film music fans as the composer of the score for THE BLOB.


Don't rule out the early Reprise albums either, including "Ring a Ding" with Johnny Mandel and "Swingin' Brass" with Neal Hefti.

 
 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 7:03 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

I would never rule them out. Even after the early ones, CONCERT SINATRA has some breathtaking Riddle arrangements, and MOONLIGHT SINATRA is one of my favorite Sinatra albums of all-time.

 
 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 7:03 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

When I think Gordon Jenkins I think Nat King Cole all the way. Stardust. 'Nuf said.
But leave a little room for his work with Durante and Nilsson.

 
 
 Posted:   May 24, 2008 - 9:03 PM   
 By:   Overtones   (Member)

Roman Polanski was preparing to shoot FIRST DEADLY SIN when he fled USA. Sinatra picked it up and made it safe and Sinatra. The book is a twisted page-turner and in Polanski's hands it could have been right up there with CHINATOWN and ROSEMARY'S BABY. Tina Sinatra should consider a remake using the original material.

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2008 - 1:54 AM   
 By:   cwawriter   (Member)

Bruce Jenkins,a sports columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle and Gordon's son, has written a superb biography, "Goodbye: In Search of Gordon Jenkins."

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2008 - 8:26 AM   
 By:   fernando   (Member)

Hello , There is a beautiful track composed by Gordon Jenkins in the album:
FRANK SINATRA CONDUCTS TONE POEMS OF COLOR (CD)
the cd contains also music by Elmer Bernstein ,
Andre Previn, Victor Young ,Billy May , Nelson Riddle and others .
Here is the information at SAE:
http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm?ID=2677

Luis Fernando

------------------------------------------------

Gordon Jenkins is better known as an arranger for Frnak Sinatra and Nat King Cole, among others.
Did Jenkins compose other scores to anyone's knowledge?

Inquiring minds wanna know! smile Thank you!

SheriffJoe

 
 
 Posted:   May 25, 2008 - 8:40 AM   
 By:   fernando   (Member)

sorry double post

 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2022 - 4:45 PM   
 By:   Sir David of Barkeley   (Member)

I just gave a listen to parts of Jenkins' arrangements for Harry Nilsson's Great American Songbook "throwback" album, that preceded Ronstadt's by more than a few years.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2022 - 10:12 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Intros alone throughout the Schmilsson album are stunning. Will have to put it on to confirm but the one for “Nevertheless” has stayed in the mind’s ear for decades.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2022 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

Jenkins was never better than when paired with Sinatra. The two best are the Capitol LPs "Where are You" and "No One Cares."

Also "September of My Years" on Reprise, which contained "It Was A Very Good Year".
Jenkins was great at writing for strings. Many years ago (60's?) he wrote a reference work titled "String Along".
It contained songs scored for strings and came with a 45 rpm recording. Long out of print

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2022 - 10:39 AM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

Every Capitol Sinatra album, whether arranged by Jenkins, Riddle, or Billy May, is a classic in its own way. Even the later ones, such as the weary-sounding POINT OF NO RETURN and the brisk SINATRA'S SWINGIN' SESSION, are superb. Nobody seems to mention NO ONE CARES that much, but it's a brilliant album. Jenkins' arrangements for the 1957 Sinatra Christmas album are excellent as well. "Jingle Bells" with those squeaky strings never failing to entertain.

Another Capitol vocalist, Nat King Cole, also used Jenkins as an arranger, and Cole's famous Christmas album was arranged and conducted by Ralph Carmichael, best known to film music fans as the composer of the score for THE BLOB.


The Blob song was written by Bacharach and David, Sung by "The Five Blobs". I think it's their only record

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2022 - 10:44 AM   
 By:   roy phillippe   (Member)

Every Capitol Sinatra album, whether arranged by Jenkins, Riddle, or Billy May, is a classic in its own way. Even the later ones, such as the weary-sounding POINT OF NO RETURN and the brisk SINATRA'S SWINGIN' SESSION, are superb. Nobody seems to mention NO ONE CARES that much, but it's a brilliant album. Jenkins' arrangements for the 1957 Sinatra Christmas album are excellent as well. "Jingle Bells" with those squeaky strings never failing to entertain.

Another Capitol vocalist, Nat King Cole, also used Jenkins as an arranger, and Cole's famous Christmas album was arranged and conducted by Ralph Carmichael, best known to film music fans as the composer of the score for THE BLOB.


Don't rule out the early Reprise albums either, including "Ring a Ding" with Johnny Mandel and "Swingin' Brass" with Neal Hefti.



Hefti also arranged the "Sinatra-Basie" album. I knew Mr. Hefti and he told me the title originally was to be
"Sinatra-Basie-Hefti" with the three of them on the cover. When his picture was deleted he asked that his arranging credit be removed. Hefti was the A&R man at Reprise at the very beginning of the label.

 
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