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 Posted:   Nov 22, 2008 - 10:48 PM   
 By:   Sir David of Barkeley   (Member)

What are the names of classical music pieces that one us might like if we like a certain composer or film score? (They were written in similar idioms.)

For instance,

If you like David Raksin, you might like Alban Berg (his Lulu-Suite, Der Wein, or Lyric Suite)

If you like Goldsmith's Planet of the Apes, you might like Edgard Varese's "Arcana"

 
 Posted:   Nov 22, 2008 - 10:49 PM   
 By:   Sir David of Barkeley   (Member)



...that some will discuss how some film score ripped off a certain classical work.

 
 Posted:   Nov 22, 2008 - 11:02 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)



...that some will discuss how some film score ripped off a certain classical work.


At least you didn't use that cheesy old photo of our favorite psychic fraud in this case, and posted a refreshingly new image of his puss. big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 22, 2008 - 11:12 PM   
 By:   TJ   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Nov 22, 2008 - 11:19 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Oh, THANK you, TJ. big grin

Jeron Criswell King (August 18, 1907 – October 4, 1982) born Jeron Criswell Konig, and known by his stage-name The Amazing Criswell, was an American psychic who was famous for his wildly inaccurate predictions. In person, he went by Charles Criswell King, and was sometimes credited as Jeron King Criswell. The name "Criswell" was pronounced ['k??zw?l] .

Criswell said that he had worked as a radio announcer and news broadcaster early in his life. He began buying time on a local Los Angeles television station in the early 1950s to run an early equivalent of infomercials for his own "Criswell Family Vitamins." To fill in the airtime, he also began his "Criswell Predicts" segments as part of the show. The shows made him something of a minor, off-beat celebrity in Los Angeles and around Hollywood, and his friendship with old show-business types like Mae West and other up-and-coming fringe celebrities like Korla Pandit made Criswell an entertaining presence at parties.

His fame brought him appearances on the Jack Paar show, among others, and he published two books of predictions.

Criswell found cinematic infamy in the movies of Ed Wood, including Plan 9 from Outer Space (filmed 1956, released 1959) Night of the Ghouls (filmed 1959, released 1987) and Orgy of the Dead (1965). He was portrayed by actor Jeffrey Jones in the biopic Ed Wood (1994), in which it is suggested that Criswell was simply a showman and never claimed to be a real psychic. However, those who knew him, such as actress and fellow Plan 9 alumna Maila Nurmi ("Vampira"), have disputed this. According to writer Charles A. Coulombe, whose family rented an apartment from the psychic, Criswell told Coulombe's father " had the gift, but … lost it when I started taking money for it."

Criswell was a flamboyant figure, best remembered for his spitcurled hair, his stentorian speaking style, and his sequined tuxedo. He was the possessor of a coffin, in which he claimed to sleep (he had grown up in a troubled family in Indiana with relatives who owned a funeral home, and said that he had gotten comfortable with sleeping in caskets in the storeroom). The casket found its way into one of Wood's later works, the 1971 pornographic film Necromania




[edit] Predictions
Criswell's predictions were nationally syndicated. Additionally, the psychic appeared on the television show Criswell Predicts on then KLAC Channel 13 (now KCOP-13) in Los Angeles, as well as being kinescoped for syndication on other television venues. Criswell's announcer, Bob Shields, would eventually become the 'judge' on Divorce Court. Criswell was known for wearing his heavy pancake makeup in public after his live program was broadcast in the Los Angeles area. Only a handful of select people were allowed to be in the KCOP studio during his broadcast and were always taken to the Brown Derby afterwards as his guests. Criswell was one of the very few Hollywood personalities at that time who was completely approachable. He frequently interacted with fans, and would speak to complete strangers as if they were old friends.

Criswell authored several books of predictions, including 1968's Criswell Predicts: From Now to the Year 2000. In this book, the author claimed that Denver would be struck by a ray from space that would cause all metal to adopt the qualities of rubber, leading to horrific accidents at amusement parks. He also predicted an outbreak of mass cannibalism and the end of planet Earth, which he set as happening on August 18, 1999 (perhaps coincidentally, his birthday).

Criswell was an ardent student of history. He was of firm belief that history repeats itself, that the United States is what he often referred to as the 'modern Romans.' Each day, he would read the St. Louis Post-Dispatch from cover to cover, looking for signs and clues for his predictions. In his later years, he became obsessed with the Mayan calendar and read every bit of information he could lay his hands on. Just prior to his death, he told several people that his previous 'end of the world predictions' were incorrect by a dozen years and the world will end on the morning of the Winter Solstice in the year 2012, which exactly coincides with the last day of the Mayan calendar.

Some sources claim that Criswell's most famous prediction was made on The Jack Paar Program (1962-65) in March 1963, when he predicted that John F. Kennedy would not run for reelection in 1964 because something was going to happen to him in November 1963.[1]


[edit] Private life
Criswell was married to a former speakeasy dancer named Halo Meadows, who once appeared on You Bet Your Life, and who Coulombe describes as "quite mad": "Mrs. Criswell had a huge standard poodle (named 'Buttercup') which she was convinced was the reincarnation of her cousin Thomas. She spent a great deal of time sunbathing … which, given her size, was not too pleasing a sight."

Criswell was a longtime friend of actress Mae West, once predicting her impending rise to the position of President of the United States, whereupon she, Criswell and George Liberace, the brother of showman Liberace, would ride a rocket to the moon. West used Criswell as her personal psychic, as well as lavishing him with gifts of homecooked food, dropped off via chauffeur. The food was often then eaten by Criswell and Nurmi, who refused any direct contact with West after a many-decade-old unpleasant experience with the film actress. Additionally, West was known to sell Criswell her old luxury cars for $5. For her 1955 album The Fabulous Mae West, she recorded a song about the psychic, titled, appropriately enough, "Criswell Predicts."

In the early 1950s, Criswell lived in the penthouse of the Highland Towers Apartments at 1922 N. Highland Avenue. The building is a city landmark today. His grave is located at Pierce Brothers Valhalla Memorial Park.

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 1:58 AM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

Almost any of Resphighi's large scale orchestral works could appeal to those who love epic film scores. With powerful and colorful orchestration, they often sound as though they were written for scenes from movies – almost like Rozsa, Waxman and Tiomkin rolled into one. A bit of Herrmann too. I'd say some of Williams' more exotic Indiana Jones work could owe a small debt to Resphigi.

Feste Romana (Roman Festivals) is one of the better-known examples of the composer at his most flamboyant, with a furious, exciting opening movement depicting Christians being thrown to the lions and a frenzied Colosseum crowd.
Chandos label produced some superb-sounding Resphigi symphonic recordings a decade or so ago. Well worth seeking out some clips.

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 2:09 AM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

I found this, which is a good example of what I mean about Resphigi.
Belkis, Queen of Sheba... I think many of you will be impressed:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3IGwRP-STxA&feature=related


Resphigi died in 1889, so all our favorite Golden Age composers were aware of him. Maybe that's why a lot of classical listeners aren't so impressed with film scores – there were classical composers writing the same way a hundred years before our movie music heroes. There's even a touch of Elmer Bernstein at 1:30"... from way back in the 1800s! Oh, and how about the Herrmannesque start – Talos from Jason and the Argonauts?

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 3:10 AM   
 By:   Hadrian   (Member)

I found this, which is a good example of what I mean about Resphigi.
Belkis, Queen of Sheba... I think many of you will be impressed:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3IGwRP-STxA&feature=related


Resphigi died in 1889, so all our favorite Golden Age composers were aware of him. Maybe that's why a lot of classical listeners aren't so impressed with film scores – there were classical composers writing the same way a hundred years before our movie music heroes. There's even a touch of Elmer Bernstein at 1:30"... from way back in the 1800s! Oh, and how about the Herrmannesque start – Talos from Jason and the Argonauts?


Good call on Respighi. If anyone is a fan of Rozsa's epic film music (BEN HUR, QUO VADIS, EL CID), they will definitely love Respighi's music (CHURCH WINDOWS, PINES OF ROME, FOUNTAINS OF ROME, ROMAN FESTIVALS, BELKIS, QUEEN OF SHEBA). Although I'm not sure where you get the 1889 date. Ottorino Respighi was born in 1879 and died in 1936.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 4:27 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Sibelius's The Tempest, one of the eatly 20th century's greatest unsungs, would be very worthwhile to the film music listener -- and it's unsurprising, as it's incidental music (which is the most filmscore-like of classical music genres in conception). Sibelius wrote a lot of incidental music, but this is probably the best one for this thread.

Of course, I love *all* Sibelius...but yeah. Also, his Kullervo, and Lammenkainen suite (the last movement is especially reminicent), and...

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 8:25 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Good call on Respighi. If anyone is a fan of Rozsa's epic film music (BEN HUR, QUO VADIS, EL CID), they will definitely love Respighi's music (CHURCH WINDOWS, PINES OF ROME, FOUNTAINS OF ROME, ROMAN FESTIVALS, BELKIS, QUEEN OF SHEBA). Although I'm not sure where you get the 1889 date. Ottorino Respighi was born in 1879 and died in 1936.

PINES OF ROME was used wonderfully as a film score in the new FANTASIA from a few years back (about flying whales, of all things!).

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 2:51 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

Although I'm not sure where you get the 1889 date. Ottorino Respighi was born in 1879 and died in 1936.

You're quite right. An ASTRONOMER called Resphigi died in 1889. I misread my reference. Still, the point about his work pre-dating that of our favorite film score composers is valid.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 3:04 PM   
 By:   TJ   (Member)

PINES OF ROME, FOUNTAINS OF ROME, ROMAN FESTIVALS


I have a (Sony, I think) Cd with these three works.

They really are quite good, I heard Pines of Rome live from the Pacific Symphony----the Pacific Symphony's web iste marketed it as "influenced on film music" or something like that, and one of my family member noticed that and asked if i would be interested---of course! I was unaware of the man's works prior to that, a pity.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 3:10 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

If you like the Roman Trillogy, seek out his Belkis, Queen of Sheba. It's sure to please.

(there's very few pieces of music I'd want a full recording of more than it. Alas, only the four movement suite has been recorded)

 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 3:58 PM   
 By:   CH-CD   (Member)

If you liked Bill Conti's "The Right Stuff",
you'll love Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 6:13 PM   
 By:   John McMasters   (Member)

Edited: Removed due to pretentiousness...

--syn

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 23, 2008 - 6:39 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

If you liked Bill Conti's "The Right Stuff",
you'll love Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto big grin


Actually, an audiobook about Tchaikovsky's life and music even points this out (complete with back to back comparison). It's one of those 'so close..yet juuuuuust away from being exact' moments.

Still, I can't deny the Tchaikovsky VC isn't a great piece.

And speaking of my favorite late romantic composers, there's also Dvorak's four tone poems cycle (namly, The Golden Spinning Wheel, The Noon Witch, The Wild Dove, and The Water Goblin) -- they are fantasticly juicey with filmic style writing.

Also, Kachaturian's...well..anything. But I'm sure Horner fans know about HIM big grin
(hint: Symphony #3).


And Rachmaninov's symphonies. And...

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2021 - 5:58 PM   
 By:   Sir David of Barkeley   (Member)

JJ Annaud claims Sarde's QUEST FOR FIRE is modeled somewhat on Penderecki's "Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima"



You tell me...


 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2021 - 4:48 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

Almost any of Resphighi's large scale orchestral works could appeal to those who love epic film scores. With powerful and colorful orchestration, they often sound as though they were written for scenes from movies – almost like Rozsa, Waxman and Tiomkin rolled into one. A bit of Herrmann too. I'd say some of Williams' more exotic Indiana Jones work could owe a small debt to Resphigi.

Yes, I agree.

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2021 - 4:50 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

If you like THE OMEN by Jerry Goldsmith, you might also like Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2021 - 5:38 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

If you like Jim Phelps, then you might like OnyaBirri.

 
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