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 Posted:   Feb 12, 2009 - 8:19 AM   
 By:   Sylvester Marcus   (Member)

I read a few years ago that Robert Harris was working on a full restoration of the roadshow edition of this movie. Has anyone heard any news on this ? Also what happened to Karen Sharpe Kramer's plans to produce a sequel ?
Anyone know ?

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2009 - 8:30 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

He evidently could never get the backing for a full restoration project. Too bad since he unearthed some additional material many of us have never seen or heard like the "police bulletins" intermission audio.

In the meantime, my LD and it's DVD transfer remains the only version of the film I watch. The standard DVD which is missing the Overture and the restored footage from the LD presentation is worthless.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2009 - 11:42 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

This is such a complicated issue. I'm still not sure how much Kramer was involved in the re-cutting for general release, but he definitely realized the picture was too long. The only scene -- and I mean the ONLY scene that really needs to be restored is the scene that sets up the encounter with Buster Keaton. And that's still lost. Everything else that has been restored (mostly from alternate takes) is mere padding. One restored scene is very disturbing - where Winters talks about wanting to help out his landlady. It removes his character from the land of the bizarre and gives him motivation - which puts a whole new outlook on his destructive tendencies.

I think the picture plays much, much, much, much better at 154 minutes, or 162 if you add the overture, entracte and exit music. Yeah, it's great to see Roy Roberts, Cliff Norton, James Flavin and a few others who are in the added footage. But comedy is all about pacing. And I think if a restored print were ever struck and shown to an audience it would outlast them in the auditorium.

As for the radio calls, I actually recreated them from the original script (I do a mean Stacy Harris and Allen Jenkins!) and we've used the recreated tracks at several screenings. The real McCoys played on the west coast a few years ago.

JUST GIVE ME THE COMPLETE SCORE!!!!

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2009 - 11:58 AM   
 By:   Jon A. Bell   (Member)

I think the picture plays much, much, much, much better at 154 minutes, or 162 if you add the overture, entracte and exit music. Yeah, it's great to see Roy Roberts, Cliff Norton, James Flavin and a few others who are in the added footage. But comedy is all about pacing. And I think if a restored print were ever struck and shown to an audience it would outlast them in the auditorium.

I absolutely agree. I think the even-longer version is simply TOO long, and the final theatrical cut is better paced.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2009 - 3:11 PM   
 By:   Sylvester Marcus   (Member)

I think the picture plays much, much, much, much better at 154 minutes, or 162 if you add the overture, entracte and exit music.

Even though I posted this question, I would have to agree that you are probably right. I own both the general release version on DVD, and Kramer's restored version on a MGM/UA VHS set from the early 90's. The restored Winter's scene regarding 'the electric wheelchair ' is a gem. The only other memorable scene that doesn't drag the extended version out is the
' Mike Mazurski threatening Phil Silvers ' scene. There are 3 or 4 posts on Harris' Home Theatre Forum thread, that pose the question of a restoration. I could not locate any response from Harris which leads me to believe that this may still be a ' live ' project. I know he is working on a restored digital print of ' The Alamo ' that is due out soon. However, I have to admit that that movie, even more than IAMMMMW falls into the category of an overly long running time even in it's current version. But, I'm sure there are many out there (not I) who would clamor at a ' new ' DVD release of ' The Alamo ' ? After all, the whole point is profit. I know Harris has verbally shown interest in cleaning up the print to
' The Big Country '. I'm curious if Peck's estate has any overseer rights to this film since it was produced by his company. The most exciting element of a ' Big Country ' restoration would be the fading color, and the soundtrack. As far as I know, and according to the IMDB, the only existing soundtrack is in mono westrex, so that leaves print quality.

and yes, I have hoped for a complete soundtrack release to IAMMMMW for years.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 14, 2009 - 2:44 AM   
 By:   mulan98   (Member)

Robert Harris occasionally spends time at a website called Film Tech which is primarily aimed at projectionists.

He took the trouble to email me on a couple of enquiries.

You may find more info' on MMMMW there.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 14, 2009 - 3:41 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

If a long version has scenes from some faded print, then I wouldn't want to know. I'm happy with the DVD, it's probably longer than the version I saw at the cinema, they used to hack these long roadshow movies down for general release.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2010 - 7:25 PM   
 By:   TJ001   (Member)

Hmm. I heard the intermission police call sequence at a 70mm screening of MMMMW at American Cinematheque here in L.A. a few years ago. Now I'm wondering if that was the real thing or an incredible simulation/recreation?

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2010 - 7:36 PM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

(Edit). I'd forgotten about the post about recreated calls made for theatrical screenings which made my original post potentially erroneous.

There's another scene of Barrie Chase chasing after Dick Shawn after he takes her car to go meet Mother that would also be nice to see back in, in addition to the missing Buster Keaton one.

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2010 - 9:58 PM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

Hmm. I heard the intermission police call sequence at a 70mm screening of MMMMW at American Cinematheque here in L.A. a few years ago. Now I'm wondering if that was the real thing or an incredible simulation/recreation?

The American Cinemateque ran the real radio calls. I did the recreations for a screening at the Loews Jersey. If I can dig it out I'll post the recording.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2010 - 2:02 AM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

Comcast On Demand is currently running the 187 minute version of Mad Mad Mad Mad World (via TCM) right now.

I let it play in the background while I was working yesterday.

Greg Espinoza

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 3:53 AM   
 By:   The Jazz Slinger   (Member)

He evidently could never get the backing for a full restoration project.

I'd pay [u[twice the cost of a restoration for MGM/UA to burn the negative.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

I read a few years ago that Robert Harris was working on a full restoration of the roadshow edition of this movie. Has anyone heard any news on this ? Also what happened to Karen Sharpe Kramer's plans to produce a sequel ?
Anyone know ?



Karen Sharpe Kramer was trying to organize a search to find the original roadshow version of the film (according to Witkopedia), but without any success.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 1:46 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

He evidently could never get the backing for a full restoration project. Too bad since he unearthed some additional material many of us have never seen or heard like the "police bulletins" intermission audio.

In the meantime, my LD and it's DVD transfer remains the only version of the film I watch. The standard DVD which is missing the Overture and the restored footage from the LD presentation is worthless.


Is this one in which the restored footage was put on the D.V.D. as a special feature? And I won't watch it if it doesn't have the Overture. Sorry!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 19, 2010 - 1:49 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Hmm. I heard the intermission police call sequence at a 70mm screening of MMMMW at American Cinematheque here in L.A. a few years ago. Now I'm wondering if that was the real thing or an incredible simulation/recreation?

The American Cinemateque ran the real radio calls. I did the recreations for a screening at the Loews Jersey. If I can dig it out I'll post the recording.


I wonder how these would work if they were used on the restored version, if required?

 
 
 Posted:   May 9, 2012 - 12:36 PM   
 By:   Pauls19344   (Member)

Though I'm happy for the La La land release, the biggest frustration to me is that the liner notes contain TONS of innacuracies...! I'll always wish they at least asked me to contribute to it!

 
 
 Posted:   May 9, 2012 - 3:50 PM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

It's a great looking Blu-ray.

 
 Posted:   May 9, 2012 - 6:17 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

I'll always wish they at least asked me to contribute to it!


One way you could contribute is this message board. I, for one, would be very interested to read your critique of the notes. You might even be able to reach a wider audience of IAMMMMW fans, than just those who bought the CD, right here. smile

 
 
 Posted:   May 9, 2012 - 10:54 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

For the time being, I have a D.V.D.-R. of the restored version, though I'm exploring the possibility of getting the blu ray version (even though it's the cut version).

 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2012 - 6:17 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

Lookie, L.A. area FSMers . . .

http://www.oscars.org/press/pressreleases/2012/20120626.html

 
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