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 Posted:   Dec 5, 2001 - 11:18 PM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

is this true? does anyone know? how will release it?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 5, 2001 - 11:45 PM   
 By:   JEC   (Member)

is this true? does anyone know? how will release it?

Yes. It appears to be true. See note at
http://www.chelsearialto.com/soundtracks/crstudio.htm

Forthcoming releases prepared by CR Studios include Hugo Friedhofer's THE BISHOP'S WIFE; Dimitri Tiomkin's THE BIG SKY; Alfred Newman's WILSON and Max Steiner's A SUMMER PLACE.


 
 
 Posted:   Dec 5, 2001 - 11:47 PM   
 By:   JEC   (Member)

Double post...

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2001 - 2:47 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

Do you think this will be a Rhino release? KING KONG was prepared by BYU but issued by Rhino.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2001 - 8:53 AM   
 By:   soundtrakker   (Member)

Whenever Max Steiner was given a great movie to score, he always rose to the occasion. The incredible on-screen chemistry between Troy Donahue and Sandra Dee inspired some of his greatest music for A SUMMER PLACE. The two young lovers tell their parents that they are going to see KING KONG, when, in fact, they plan a moonlight rendezvous on the beach. While cuddling, Dee, who has seen the movie, relates the plot to Donahue. Thus, Steiner found himself scoring music to dialogue about a film he had scored more than a quarter century earlier!


 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2001 - 10:18 AM   
 By:   Originalthinkr@aol.com   (Member)

Great still, Soundtrakker!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2001 - 7:56 PM   
 By:   JohnnyK   (Member)

At long, long last! Two years ago I missed an online auction which featured a number of Steiner LPs, including Summer Place and Parrish. Those "youthful" scores from a man in his 70s were revelations of musical insight and filmscore purpose. Dare I hope for Parrish, too, on CD?

Thanks for the heads-up post!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 7, 2001 - 10:54 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

...Thus, Steiner found himself scoring music to dialogue about a film he had scored more than a quarter century earlier!

I never thought of that! Thanks for pointing it out. A release is long overdue...and fantastic news. Indulge me as I bring back a post from 4/25/98 and join me as I celebrate & salivate in anticipation:

A Summer Place.
Peyton Place again, this time off the mainland. Cliched? Somewhat. Outdated, even laughable dialogue? Eh, at times (Molly's "naughty dreams"). But the movie unravels the pretentious pseudo-priggish mores of 1950s cinema in a manner that isn't shocking now but surely must have been considered bold for its day.

And then there's the music. Cliched? Only when that sly, leery sax oils its way across the ears while underscoring sexual tension. Repetitive? Well...yeah. Overblown? Maybe. But it's joyous excess. And that's the genius of Max Steiner: his music brings dignity to an otherwise mundane (albeit stylish) B-movie. What does he dignify? Oh, human longings, little things like newly-found love, old love rekindled, unspoken passions, hopes, shattered dreams...and damaged lives. And all with real-live melodies that pull you in, intoxicate and ultimately make you ignore the fact that you're watching a potboiler or that you simply don't give a damn that it's a potboiler.

Dignity. That's what comes to mind first when I think of Max Steiner, Film Composer: elevating soap opera to dignified heights. I think of the Belle Watling Theme when Melanie thanks the madam-with-a-heart in Gone With The Wind; the final shots of Now, Voyager; the love story with the platinum blonde and the big ape; and in A Summer Place the close-ups of Dorothy McGuire, especially the one during the early scene at the dinner table at the inn.

Steiner basically employed variations of four love themes throughout the picture. Let's call them (1) the Adult Love Theme introduced majestically for the dashing opening credits sequence; (2) the Teen Love Theme made memorable and best-selling by Percy Faith and his orchestra; (3) the Sex Theme already alluded to with deference to its arrangement for that old devil's instrument, the sax (and how 'bout them amplified piano triplets--shocking, Mr. Steiner, shocking!); and (4) the Innocent Love Theme first heard during Molly's good-night to Papa.

I recommend you ignore the cloying harp-and-vibraphone arrangement of the latter the first time around and savor the string arrangement the second. Just the same, all 4 melodies are pure listening pleasures. And so what if Johnny's Theme sounds more suited to a pre-teen heading off for a summer camp jaunt than an adolescent with raging hormones who's barely surviving his folks' loveless marriage. The bottom line, friends, is that it's a crying shame that the entire score has never been released, so far as I know. Warner Bros. has an ignominious reputation for discarding original soundtrack sources and it wouldn't surprise if this one is among those lost forever. If worse comes to worse, get the video (the film's a fine transfer to tape) and just watch/listen to the first 45 minutes. Watch and listen to the first 45 minutes. You will not be disappointed. Guaranteed.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2002 - 12:22 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

SUMMER PLACE is no longer listed as upcomong on CR Studios web site. Does anyone have any updated status on this release?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 7, 2002 - 5:26 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Hey joe--either way, if you need a Summer Place-like fix, put on Land Ho from Victor Young's Around The World In 80 Days. I just did. What a great seafaring feel.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 8, 2002 - 2:01 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

SUMMER PLACE is no longer listed as upcomong on CR Studios web site. Does anyone have any updated status on this release?

It is coming! Check this out:

Thanks for you kind words, Joe. A SUMMER PLACE will, indeed, be released later this year as part of the BYU/Screen Archives series. Since a formal announcement has yet to be made, however, I'm holding off discussing it on the website. Rest assured, though, that it is forthcoming.

Very kindest regards,

Ray Faiola
NYC

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 11, 2002 - 5:05 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Hey joe--either way, if you need a Summer Place-like fix, put on Land Ho from Victor Young's Around The World In 80 Days. I just did. What a great seafaring feel.

...and add to that wonderful ambience The Lagoon from Herrmann's Beneath the 12-Mile Reef. I just did right now!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 12, 2002 - 7:33 PM   
 By:   joec   (Member)



...and add to that wonderful ambience The Lagoon from Herrmann's Beneath the 12-Mile Reef. I just did right now!


Believe or not, I don't have AROUND THE WORLD on cd. I did wear out at least 2 copies of the LP which was one of the earliest soundtracks I remeber listening to. The cd was an early digetal release and I suppose I am waiting for updated, remastered (and perhaps expanded) issue. But since this is a MCA release, I may be waiting in vain.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2020 - 2:06 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

...Indulge me as I bring back a post from 4/25/98 and join me as I celebrate & salivate in anticipation:

A Summer Place.
Peyton Place again, this time off the mainland. Cliched? Somewhat. Outdated, even laughable dialogue? Eh, at times (Molly's "naughty dreams"). But the movie unravels the pretentious pseudo-priggish mores of 1950s cinema in a manner that isn't shocking now but surely must have been considered bold for its day.

And then there's the music. Cliched? Only when that sly, leery sax oils its way across the ears while underscoring sexual tension. Repetitive? Well...yeah. Overblown? Maybe. But it's joyous excess. And that's the genius of Max Steiner: his music brings dignity to an otherwise mundane (albeit stylish) B-movie. What does he dignify? Oh, human longings, little things like newly-found love, old love rekindled, unspoken passions, hopes, shattered dreams...and damaged lives. And all with real-live melodies that pull you in, intoxicate and ultimately make you ignore the fact that you're watching a potboiler or that you simply don't give a damn that it's a potboiler.

Dignity. That's what comes to mind first when I think of Max Steiner, Film Composer: elevating soap opera to dignified heights. I think of the Belle Watling Theme when Melanie thanks the madam-with-a-heart in Gone With The Wind; the final shots of Now, Voyager; the love story with the platinum blonde and the big ape; and in A Summer Place the close-ups of Dorothy McGuire, especially the one during the early scene at the dinner table at the inn.

Steiner basically employed variations of four love themes throughout the picture. Let's call them (1) the Adult Love Theme introduced majestically for the dashing opening credits sequence; (2) the Teen Love Theme made memorable and best-selling by Percy Faith and his orchestra; (3) the Sex Theme already alluded to with deference to its arrangement for that old devil's instrument, the sax (and how 'bout them amplified piano triplets--shocking, Mr. Steiner, shocking!); and (4) the Innocent Love Theme first heard during Molly's good-night to Papa.

I recommend you ignore the cloying harp-and-vibraphone arrangement of the latter the first time around and savor the string arrangement the second. Just the same, all 4 melodies are pure listening pleasures. And so what if Johnny's Theme sounds more suited to a pre-teen heading off for a summer camp jaunt than an adolescent with raging hormones who's barely surviving his folks' loveless marriage. The bottom line, friends, is that it's a crying shame that the entire score has never been released, so far as I know. Warner Bros. has an ignominious reputation for discarding original soundtrack sources and it wouldn't surprise if this one is among those lost forever. If worse comes to worse, get the video (the film's a fine transfer to tape) and just watch/listen to the first 45 minutes. Watch and listen to the first 45 minutes. You will not be disappointed. Guaranteed.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2020 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

OK now that the 1998 post has been de-resurrected from up there and brought down here, follow the evolution from holy grail to here...

https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=16627&forumID=1&archive=1

...and then here...

https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=21271&forumID=1&archive=1

...as we go from holy grail 1998 to still a holy grail 2001 to holy grail no more 2004 to celebration 2020 and Steven C. Smith's Music By MAX STEINER - The Epic Life Of Hollywood's Most Influential Composer, p.389:

"MAX HAD COMPOSED ONE OF THE BEST-SELLING SONGS in the history of recorded music. In a plot twist worthy of Hollywood, he had succeeded by not really trying. It 'was amazing,' John Morgan recalled. 'He said it wasn't his intent. It was a happy surprise.'"

"That surprise fulfilled two of Steiner's greatest ambitions. Not only did it give him a record-breaking hit; within three years of the song's Grammy win, 50 years of financial struggle were finally behind him. The Percy Faith disc and sheet music sales alone brought Steiner more than a quarter of a million dollars within months--more than 2.2 million today."

And this footnote:

"ASCAP royalty statements are available only to their recipients. But at least 150 Steiner films were shown during his lifetime on television; and since ASCAP royalties generally equal or exceed record sale royalties, TV showings of A Summer Place--plus the many films that reused its theme--likely generated millions by itself."

Hooray for Max! You put in your time and earned it, pal!! cool

 
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