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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: The Thief Who Came to Dinner
 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2016 - 8:16 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

I'm surprised it's taken you this long to get the CD, Graham smile



You should see the list of things I don't have!

Just bumping this because more people need to chime in and say it's a brilliant score. You can even say you hate it, but you'll have to explain why. Anyway, my musical rabbit has been dancing with joy at just how great this score is. I know I'm probably about ten years late, but I got there.

I haven't got around to doing what I said I'd do though, which was programming the whole thing in film order. Have any of you done that? I did however listen to the Bonus Tracks on their own, and was even more impressed than last time (which was the first). There's not a wasted note. As I said before, some of it is more dense than the tracks on the original release, but it's great stuff too. A lot of those low brass clusters reminded me of Gil Mellé. Now there's a connection I'd never made before - Mellé and Mancini. You'd think at first they were two very different animals, but I suppose there's a common denominator, however tenuous, in their jazz/ symphonic background and evolution. There might even be another Gil binding them together - Gil Evans. Whatever. I might do the "full film jobby" tonight. I'll let you know if it works. As the rabbit said in the previous thread, I think the Bonus Tracks, interspersed throughout the original presentation, would make a great balance. Random thought - some of those moodier tracks are like Mancini's great, underrated THE MONEYCHANGERS. Intrada did that one in 2011 and I've already had it for five years. What's keeping the rest of you? Tee hee.

Quick quickie sign-off question for now - I didn't see mention of this in the liner notes (maybe I missed it) - Did LK decide to present the LP programme first as such, just because he thought it was a great album (as he did with THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR)? Or did he consider interspersing the Bonus Tracks in film order? Lukas, I know you're probably busy changing nappies or playing on the swings or something, but we'd (I'd) be interested to know.

A gem of a release, in film order or not.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2016 - 11:51 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

November 13th 1972 - First day of the recording sessions at Burbank Studios. Happy 44th birthday, Thief!

I'm sure you're all eager to know what I did, after my latest flurry of enthusiasm on this thread. I did actually programme the CD in film order, but because I was just looking at numbers and not titles, I forgot to leave out the three "Country Source" tracks, so they kind of ruined the experiment a bit. I like the other source cues, but not those ones.

So then I thought, okay, let's try it again, programming it all in film order but omitting the three offending culprits. Then I thought to hell with all this fannying about. And I listened to it all again as presented on the CD (but stopping before the Country Source trio). And bloomin' 'eck, it's still great. Yeah, maybe it would be nice to have "The Really Big Heist" as the climactic piece, but on the other hand... it doesn't really matter a bit.

Stupendous music.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2016 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   Pedestrian Wolf   (Member)

November 13th 1972 - First day of the recording sessions at Burbank Studios. Happy 44th birthday, Thief!

I'm sure you're all eager to know what I did, after my latest flurry of enthusiasm on this thread. I did actually programme the CD in film order, but because I was just looking at numbers and not titles, I forgot to leave out the three "Country Source" tracks, so they kind of ruined the experiment a bit. I like the other source cues, but not those ones.

So then I thought, okay, let's try it again, programming it all in film order but omitting the three offending culprits. Then I thought to hell with all this fannying about. And I listened to it all again as presented on the CD (but stopping before the Country Source trio). And bloomin' 'eck, it's still great. Yeah, maybe it would be nice to have "The Really Big Heist" as the climactic piece, but on the other hand... it doesn't really matter a bit.

Stupendous music.


Seconded. I go back and forth between the (mostly) full score and the album sequence, but the score is so fantastic either way. Occasionally I toss in the opening cue from Return of the Pink Panther, because it fits much better here than it does on its own album. This and Quincy Jones's The Split were two of my biggest writing aids when I was finishing the dissertation.

 
 Posted:   Nov 13, 2016 - 5:57 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


I left the album program because I thought it played better that way than in film sequence.

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 14, 2016 - 5:35 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

I left the album program because I thought it played better that way than in film sequence.

Lukas


It is indeed what I'd call a "perfect" album prog. As I said, I just wanted to see if it would "work" in film order. I think it actually does to a certain extent, but I also decided that it's not worth all the fannying around, so I'm just going to keep playing it the way it is.

Top-notch job, LK!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2022 - 12:26 PM   
 By:   tim_p   (Member)

Another CD I’ve had for a while - bought a few years back after watching the film due to it having a screenplay by Walter Hill and thinking “this is some good stuff!”

Played for the first time today and oh boy those slow and low brass and string grooves - like a funkier/harder John Barry. I’m talking specifically about tracks like the back half of Theme, Dog Eat Dog and The Really Big Heist.

It’s the only Mancini score I own. What other scores would Mancini fans recommend that contain a good amount of this style of composition or is this it? I know there’s a VERY similar nod in the early part of the main title cue for Nightwing but it isn’t developed in the rest of the score. It’s also a sound of its time, ie the ‘70s so I’m presumably only looking at late ‘60s-‘70s?

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2022 - 5:08 PM   
 By:   Sir David of Barkeley   (Member)

Not an easy question, but don't want to be on this planet to field only ground balls, so I gave it a try. I came up with some half-answers, since I rarely recall him writing quite exactly like this:

Obvious answer - RETURN OF THE PINK PANTHER, the jewel theft scene

A lot of his similar unison lower-brass writing I'm not recalling being for similar effects (jazz/pop-oriented sounds), so all I can recall are
--LIFEFORCE
--action scenes of PINK PANTHER STRIKES AGAIN and perhaps SILVER STREAK

But since you like this sound of his, perhaps these other "deployments" of it will encourage you to explore these scores, too.

Happy hunting, Tim!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2022 - 4:52 AM   
 By:   martyn.crosthwaite   (Member)

I left the album program because I thought it played better that way than in film sequence.

Lukas

Thank you for releasing this CD . A very good music score indeed. Such a shame that Warners have never released it on BD as the film is great fun .

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2022 - 7:16 AM   
 By:   villagardens553   (Member)

I just read through this thread and was intrigued by all of the references to the Fender Rhodes electric piano.

The Fender Rhodes was a dominant instrument in jazz, starting in the late 60s.

On his utterly sublime 69 album In a Silent Way used two Rhodes players, Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea. On his 69 album Bitches Brew he used THREE, adding Joe Zawinul. Miles had been using the Rhodes for a few years after hearing Zawinul playing it in Cannonball Adderley's group.

Zawinul, Corea, and Hancock all went on to fame spearheading their own groups, with the Rhodes as a major part. Also, George Duke played the Rhodes during this period with Frank Zappa, and Jan Hammer with the Mahavishnu Orchestra.

They all played the Rhodes as a unique instrument and yet they all had their own styles.

Mike Nock, from New Zealand, conjured some great sounds on the Rhodes on his group's (The Fourth Way) 1970 live album, Werewolf.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2022 - 7:35 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

The Fender Rhodes electric piano definitely had its own distinctive sound, which I loved. You can hear it played on tons of seventies albums.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2022 - 7:40 AM   
 By:   moolik   (Member)

How I miss those monthly FSM releases......one ..if not...the greatest labels there was for filmmusic.sniff

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2022 - 10:08 AM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)

How I miss those monthly FSM releases......one ..if not...the greatest labels there was for filmmusic.sniff

Thank you!

LK

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2022 - 10:28 AM   
 By:   Tom Servo   (Member)

I was motivated to grab this during a sale last year -or maybe it was 2020, who knows - and loved it! Such a winner of a Mancini score, immediately memorable!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2022 - 1:58 PM   
 By:   tim_p   (Member)

Not an easy question, but don't want to be on this planet to field only ground balls, so I gave it a try. I came up with some half-answers, since I rarely recall him writing quite exactly like this:
…..
Happy hunting, Tim!


Thank you David! Looking at Mancini’s body of work I did wonder if the action and suspense writing in ‘Thief was a bit of a one off but the scores you’ve quoted were ones I suspected would be in with a chance of something similar. I will investigate further…

And I agree with two of the above posters. This film needs a blu ray release (there’s not even a generally available dvd now) - maybe those in control of the Warner Archive will see fit, and, yes, the FSM label is sorely missed. I’ve only got a solid handful of the ‘70s scores but Lukas’ taste is one I share and I cherish the discs I’ve got - probably the highlight being ‘Pelham (and, just like Mancini, a brilliantly atypical composition by Grusin)

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2022 - 2:44 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

I’ve only got a solid handful of the ‘70s scores but Lukas’ taste is one I share and I cherish the discs I’ve got - probably the highlight being ‘Pelham (and, just like Mancini, a brilliantly atypical composition by Grusin)

Amen, to Pelham. Love those 70s thriller scores; some great FSM releases:

Marathon Man/The Parallax View
https://www1.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/13796/MARATHON-MAN-THE-PARALLAX-VIEW/

The French Connection
https://www1.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/38167/THE-FRENCH-CONNECTION-1-&-2/

The Yakuza
https://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/37898/YAKUZA/

The Friends of Eddie Coyle / Three Days of the Condor
https://www1.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/20114/THE-FRIENDS-OF-EDDIE-COYLE-THREE-DAYS-OF-THE-CONDOR/

Klute / All The President's Men (OOP)

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2022 - 3:09 PM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

I’ve only got a solid handful of the ‘70s scores but Lukas’ taste is one I share and I cherish the discs I’ve got - probably the highlight being ‘Pelham (and, just like Mancini, a brilliantly atypical composition by Grusin)



Er, David Shire for Pelham, actually...

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2022 - 1:04 AM   
 By:   tim_p   (Member)

Got my Dave and Davids mixed up but still brilliantly atypical. And yes dogplant all those releases have prominent spots on my shelf!

 
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