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 Posted:   Feb 5, 2002 - 1:03 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

As you might have gathered, I'm currently wading through Prendergast's FILM MUSIC: A NEGLECTED ART. In it is an interesting analysis of Raksin's score THE REDEEMER (1957?). What caught my interest was Prendergast hailing this as one of the most beautiful religious scores around. And after reading about its Bach-inspired style, I really wanted to listen to it (the transcripted excerpts of the notes didn't do me any good, as I can't read music).

So I'm wondering: Was there ever a soundtrack?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 5, 2002 - 1:20 PM   
 By:   PeterD   (Member)

Well, there apparently was an LP that included this score, but the chances of finding it (even if you lived in the United States) are apparently close to zero. You can read a reference to it in this old FSM column (scroll down to the "Raksin/Library of Congress answer"):

www.filmscoremonthly.com/articles/1998/06_Mar---This_News_Friday.asp

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 5, 2002 - 1:35 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Why, thank you, Peter. I kinda gathered that it was hard (if not impossible) to get. You never know, though. There are some really hard-core collectors in here...

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 5, 2002 - 1:38 PM   
 By:   PeterD   (Member)

Well, I just did a little more searching, and there actually is a copy of the book (with the two LPs in fine condition) for sale in the out-of-print section of the Barnes and Noble website. And it would only cost you a mere $168.75 (plus shipping, of course):

http://shop.barnesandnoble.com/OopBooks/UsedBook.asp?userid=1A47BB74R5&mscssid=XTLA5VLVR9R08JPPCQ2MVFJJJ4C26TN6&title=wonderful+inventions&ean=2810624600610

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2002 - 11:55 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Thanks again, Peter, but I have already been able to track down the soundtrack through other sources. Amazing.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2008 - 1:20 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Listening to this again for the first time in several years (the above-mentioned LP thing). Still a great score. Baroque classicism meets atonality is probably the best way to describe it.

This should be rerecorded!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2008 - 1:26 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Incomprehensible that these tracks have not yet been issued on CD. Could there be an "argument from silence"? In other words, is the fact that Lukas and others have not been talking about this score evidence that they are actually working to secure its release?

 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2008 - 1:34 PM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

It would be an excellent contender for a re-recording as the original tracks were constrained by the film's low budget.

The Society for the Preservation of Film Music released a cd of the final reels including the crucifixion scene - very modern sounding stuff, something like Alex North. Very good stuff.

The film (a series of short films, actually) are still available on VHS. . . if you still have a VHS player.

There's a thread on Intrada's boards with a link to ordering info for the tapes.

 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2008 - 8:32 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Incomprehensible that these tracks have not yet been issued on CD. Could there be an "argument from silence"? In other words, is the fact that Lukas and others have not been talking about this score evidence that they are actually working to secure its release?

It was released ages ago... OK, in 1996. Back then, you could purchase copies autographed by Mr. Raksin. But it's still available, and at a bargain price.

http://www.thescl.com/php/content.php?type=9&id=86

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2008 - 12:19 AM   
 By:   philip*eric   (Member)

Incomprehensible that these tracks have not yet been issued on CD. Could there be an "argument from silence"? In other words, is the fact that Lukas and others have not been talking about this score evidence that they are actually working to secure its release?

It was released ages ago... OK, in 1996. Back then, you could purchase copies autographed by Mr. Raksin. But it's still available, and at a bargain price.

http://www.thescl.com/php/content.php?type=9&id=86

It doesnt seem to work...












g]www.thescl.com/files/scl/Store/Raksin-Redeemer.jpg'>

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2008 - 8:10 AM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

In trying to track down more about this score, at http://www.otherminds.org/shtml/Raksin.shtml, I found the following: "For radio David Raksin wrote, narrated, and conducted interviews for the three-year series, 'The Subject is Film Music,' consisting of 64 hour-long programs. The Library of Congress, which now houses the master tapes of this series, has called the work ‘the finest oral history of the profession’ of film composing." Has anybody heard any of these? Could they be made available for listeners who cannot make it to the Library?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2008 - 9:00 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

In trying to track down more about this score, at http://www.otherminds.org/shtml/Raksin.shtml, I found the following: "For radio David Raksin wrote, narrated, and conducted interviews for the three-year series, 'The Subject is Film Music,' consisting of 64 hour-long programs. The Library of Congress, which now houses the master tapes of this series, has called the work ‘the finest oral history of the profession’ of film composing." Has anybody heard any of these? Could they be made available for listeners who cannot make it to the Library?

Yes, as previously mentioned, this is the LP that I have (in CD-R format). Or?

 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2008 - 10:38 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

It doesnt seem to work...

It's the site for Society of Composers and Lyricists. Try this:

http://www.thescl.com/php/section.php?id=4929&pos=10

and click on the bottom release.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2008 - 11:07 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....In trying to track down more about this score, at http://www.otherminds.org/shtml/Raksin.shtml, I found the following: "For radio David Raksin wrote, narrated, and conducted interviews for the three-year series, 'The Subject is Film Music,' consisting of 64 hour-long programs. The Library of Congress, which now houses the master tapes of this series, has called the work ‘the finest oral history of the profession’ of film composing." Has anybody heard any of these? Could they be made available for listeners who cannot make it to the Library?.....


This was a fascinating radio show series. I was travelling extensively at the time, but when I was at home I managed to record about 25 of the shows.

It must have been done in the late '70s or early '80s, and was broadcast on KUSC out here in Los Angeles. It included tribute shows to Korngold, Steiner, Newman, etc. who were then gone, but has live hour interviews with those Raksin could round up including Rozsa, Fielding, Friedhofer, Kaper, Mancini, Bernstein, etc.

Raksin would introduce the show and the guest and then they would usually go over a chronology of the composer's work, stopping occasionally to play a music cue illustrating the work in question. Times being what they were, the music usually came from the limited LP soundtrack examples for each or, in some cases, Gerhardt's series.

.....Overall, a really valuable historical enterprise, full of fascinating anecdotes and commentary.

 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2008 - 4:27 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

.

 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2008 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

'The Subject is Film Music,' consisting of 64 hour-long programs. The Library of Congress, which now houses the master tapes of this series, has called the work ‘the finest oral history of the profession’ of film composing." Has anybody heard any of these? Could they be made available for listeners who cannot make it to the Library?

I've heard all of them, having made reel-to-reel copies of the shows for Raksin and an archive, back in about 1984.

If you are in LA, Lester, I can clue you in to where they can be made available to scholars, assuming they are still in that archive.

 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2008 - 4:44 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)



It was released ages ago... OK, in 1996. Back then, you could purchase copies autographed by Mr. Raksin. But it's still available, and at a bargain price.



Thanks for pointing this out, George. I'd never heard of the release and had always wanted to hear more of this score.

 
 Posted:   Jan 30, 2008 - 9:29 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

(click on SCL Store, then Composer to Composer, then go to the 2nd page to find the cd).
http://www.thescl.com/site/scl/


Thanks for correcting this, David. Obviously this is one of those sites that you can enter ONLY through the home page. Clicking on a direct route worked on my computer at the time, but not nobody else's.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 31, 2008 - 8:32 AM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

Thanks David. I'm in New Orleans, LA, (not in LA, CA.), where I head an archives. So, in addition to LC (the Library of Congress) in DC, the series also resides in an archives in LA, CA. Still curious as to which one, one open to the public, like LC? How's that for alphabet soup?

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2008 - 6:52 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Still curious as to which one, one open to the public, like LC? How's that for alphabet soup?

The archives I worked for is open to the public. I'm guessing that the tapes in question would only be made available to someone doing academic, literary or musical research.

 
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