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 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 11:42 AM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

I agree with the person who thought that Jerry Goldsmith appeared to imitate Elmer Bernstein in his music to A PATCH OF BLUE.

David Raksin set out to imitate Max Steiner and Roy Webb in 2 pieces from THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL.

I have other examples where I think film composers imitated other film composers, perhaps even unintentionally:

Jerry Goldsmith --> John Barry in at least one piece of MEDICINE MAN.
John Barry --> Henry Mancini in a couple of pieces of PETULIA. (Available from FSM, in case you didn't know!)
Elmer Bernstein --> Henry Mancini in THE SILENCERS (I've only heard a little of this, so people who know the film might think otherwise)

Any others I don't know about?

Let's stay away from "imitating CLASSICAL composers" since that's probably been discussed before.

 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Alan Silvestri --> Bernard Herrmann in WHAT LIES BENEATH

 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 12:15 PM   
 By:   Stephan   (Member)

Roque Banos --> Bernard Herrmann "The Machinist"

Guy Farley --> Bernard Herrmann "Knife Edge"

John Williams --> Bernard Herrmann "The Fury"

Pino Donaggio --> Bernard Herrmann "Dressed To Kill"

naaa, this is gonna be a very very long list... *snore*

 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 12:36 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Ryuichi Sakamoto --> Pino Donaggio in FEMME FATALE smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 12:51 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Paolo Vivaldi's La baronessa di Carini rips off Hans Zimmer's The Da Vinci Code pretty blatantly.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 3:32 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Virtually everyone ripped off "Breakfast at Tiffany's" at some point or other in the 1960s, including John Williams, Neal Hefti, and others.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 3:45 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

Basil Poledouris -- Miklos Rozsa in Conan The Barbarian.
George Fenton -- Bernard Herrmann in Dangerous Liaisons.
John Williams -- Leonard Bernstein (specifically West Side Story) in "The Knight Bus" in Harry Potter III.
Toru Takemitsu -- Masaru Sato in Samurai Spy.
John Williams -- Toru Takemitsu in Images.
Jerry Goldsmith -- Georges Delerue in "Kick The Can" in Twlight Zone: The Movie.
John Williams -- Korngold, Steiner and Rozsa in Star Wars.
Ennio Morricone -- Burt Bacharach (Casino Royal) in Grand Slam.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 3:52 PM   
 By:   bladerunner   (Member)



i think every composer has their own unique style and may borrow or imitate other musicians

style or attitude ......ultimately TALENTED in their own RIGHT !!


for the longest time i keep thinking TOTAL RECALL by Jerry Goldsmith sounds like something

Basil Poledouris would have done ....maybe because he has collaborated with the director

on other numerous projects.


and how about GI JANE's propulsive score by Trevor Jones ....does that not sound Zimmerish or

something created by the Media Venture lads


the list goes on .......

 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 5:12 PM   
 By:   rmos   (Member)

John Williams --> Henry Mancini "Bachelor Flat" (especially "Mambone")

 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 5:26 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith --> Bernard Herrmann in Freud (the main title, at least).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 5:57 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith in the song he wrote for THE TROUBLE WITH ANGELS. They must have asked for a Bacharach song. Man, you can't get any closer in style.

 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 7:33 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

George Fenton -- Bernard Herrmann in Dangerous Liaisons.


I'd say Fenton's Final Analysis is his most Herrmann-esque score.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 8:56 PM   
 By:   Doc Loch   (Member)

Basically any Fellini film scored after Nino Rota died still sounds like Rota.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 9:22 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

George Fenton -- Bernard Herrmann in Dangerous Liaisons.


I'd say Fenton's Final Analysis is his most Herrmann-esque score.


Perhaps, but to me Dangerous Liaisons is the more interesting example because "going Herrmann" on on a thriller like Final Analysis is the obvious approach, whereas it is more unexpected and "out of left field" in a movie with John Malkovitch playing an 18th century fop.

Much of Dangerous Liaisons was temp-tracked with North By Northwest. Every time Fenton tried writing cues which were more "period" in style, the dramatic tension unraveled, and he soon realized that the style of the temp music is what the film needed.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2010 - 9:50 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Virtually everyone ripped off "Breakfast at Tiffany's" at some point or other in the 1960s, including John Williams, Neal Hefti, and others.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2010 - 6:13 AM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

In my opinion I can hear in the following composer's work:

John Williams> Herrmann FAMILY PLOT
Ron Goodwin> Mancini ONE OF OUR DINOSAURS IS MISSING
Han Zimmer> Harold Faltermeyer DAYS OF THUNDER
Danny Elfman> Christopher Young NIGHTBREED
Giorgio Moroder> Vince DiCola OVER THE TOP
Hans Zimmer> Klaus Doldinger CRIMSON TIDE (more of an homage)

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2010 - 6:32 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

The English composer Frank Cordell swiped Alex North a lot, though I love his work.

It depends what you refer to as 'copying' though.

To use a building analogy, if an architect sees another architect's sketches and thinks, 'Great ... I'll use this or that design in my new building', then he's copying, maybe even stealing. But suppose the original architect has a conference with his clerk of works and says, 'Hey, I think we've hit on a more effective use of reinforced steel framing in this concrete support here', and the second architect then copies THAT, well, it may be borrowing, or indeed theft technically, but it doesn't detract from the new architect's new design... though it might enable him to do more than he would otherwise have been able structurally.

If a composer uses new 'structural' or orchestrational ideas, he may OPEN THE WAY, be a facilitator for other composers to do the same. That isn't theft. You'll hear folk say people copy Mahler a lot in Romantic scores, but they don't really. They're influenced by an orchestral facility he used first, but that's not like stealing tunes etc..

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2010 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   Rnelson   (Member)

How has this thread gone this long without any mention of James Horner imitating: Jerry Goldsmith, Bernard Herrmann, etc.?

But one very vivid example comes to mind for me... Christopher Young channeling Goldsmith in Invaders from Mars.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2010 - 7:33 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Definitely disagree with some of the "imitation" mentions in this thread, but that's the mystery of the human ear. We hear things differently.

There is also a distinction between imitation (or pastiche) and being inspired by the TOOLS and SOUNDS of earlier composers. For example, STAR WARS sounds nothing like Korngold or Rozsa, even though there are elements in APPROACH that are similar.

Some mentions of my own:

John Williams as Herrmann in WITCHES OF EASTWICK, THE FURY
Danny Elfman as Herrmann in PEE WEE, STAINBOY, BATMAN and others
Danny Elfman as Nino Rota in PEE WEE, PURE LUCK, BACK TO SCHOOL and others
Alan Silvestri as Herrmann in RICOCHET, WHAT LIES BENEATH
Alan Silvestri as Morricone in THE QUICK AND THE DEAD
Jerry Goldsmith as Elfman in THE SHADOW
Don Davis as John Williams in JURASSIC PARK III
Joel McNeely as John Williams in lots of things

...and a couple not-so-specific ones:

Remote Control guys as Hans Zimmer in lots of stuff!
Contemporary action composers as John Powell's BOURNE scores in contemporary action films

Threads like this can go on forever, because there will always be composers who feel a closer connection to earlier composers. Or alternatively are asked to EMULATE the sound of another composer by the filmmaker, like Giacchino often does. That's the drawback of film music; it doesn't always allow for the same amount of originality as concert music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2010 - 7:35 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

How has this thread gone this long without any mention of James Horner imitating: Jerry Goldsmith, Bernard Herrmann, etc.?

To be honest, I've never really heard Horner sound like anyone (except maybe CASPER sounding like Elfman). Sure, there's that whole debate about THEMES and melodic lines that sound like certain classical music themes, but I've never heard him emulate or imitate a composer's style. Horner always sounds like Horner.

 
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