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 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 12:13 PM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Thanks for this one, Henry.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2016 - 6:57 AM   
 By:   Ag^Janus   (Member)

It seems a reissue of L'Uccello Dalle Piume Di Cristallo is due shortly.



Good news for me.

 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2016 - 7:26 AM   
 By:   Ed C   (Member)

Oh wow, this looks great, will definitely have to check it out!

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2016 - 6:17 PM   
 By:   Ed C   (Member)

My analysis:

http://cuebycue.blogspot.com/2016/06/the-bird-with-crystal-plumage-morricone.html

Wow - this really introduced me to the more improvisational side of Morricone's film scoring. I had no idea he had gone this far OUT!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 6:16 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Wow - this really introduced me to the more improvisational side of Morricone's film scoring. I had no idea he had gone this far OUT!

Hi, Ed C.

You are in a discovery mode - and that's great. Bear in mind, though, that Capitol records released Bird with the Crystal Plumage in 1970 on LP and that there exist some collectors who have been familiar with this facet of Morricone's compositional persona for more than 45 years.

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 6:23 AM   
 By:   Ed C   (Member)

Wow - this really introduced me to the more improvisational side of Morricone's film scoring. I had no idea he had gone this far OUT!

Hi, Ed C.

You are in a discovery mode - and that's great. Bear in mind, though, that Capitol records released Bird with the Crystal Plumage in 1970 on LP and that there exist some collectors who have been familiar with this facet of Morricone's compositional persona for more than 45 years.


Of course! The thing is, I don't like Italian Giallo and horror films. I basically don't like seeing alot of blood on the screen, and of course that's a main ingredient of these things ("Autopsy"? Uh, no thanks!). Probably like most Americans, I'm much more familiar with his spaghetti westerns and dramas. But this thread has been really educational and re-ignited a Morricone phase smile. I think I will skip watching the films and just appreciate the music as "concept albums" as Thor refers to them.

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   The Thing   (Member)

Of course! The thing is, I don't like Italian Giallo and horror films. I basically don't like seeing alot of blood on the screen, and of course that's a main ingredient of these things ("Autopsy"? Uh, no thanks!).


Blood always seems to look like red paint in those old horror films, so you should be ok watching that sort of stuff now.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 9:57 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Of course! The thing is, I don't like Italian Giallo and horror films. I basically don't like seeing alot of blood on the screen, and of course that's a main ingredient of these things ("Autopsy"? Uh, no thanks!). Probably like most Americans, I'm much more familiar with his spaghetti westerns and dramas. But this thread has been really educational and re-ignited a Morricone phase smile. I think I will skip watching the films and just appreciate the music as "concept albums" as Thor refers to them.

Yeah, I, too, am not fond of gore flicks, but the horror genre itself has produced many of my favorite soundtracks because the material can inspire composers to utilize advanced techniques from the realms of 20th century/contemporary abstract compositions.

You might want to read this thread (if you haven't already) ... :

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=103061&forumID=1&archive=0

... because there's a lot of Morricone titles on these members' lists which reside within similar aural territory to Bird with the Crystal Plumage. One can enjoy them as concept albums with no particular need to view the movies themselves.

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 10:43 AM   
 By:   Ed C   (Member)

Of course! The thing is, I don't like Italian Giallo and horror films. I basically don't like seeing alot of blood on the screen, and of course that's a main ingredient of these things ("Autopsy"? Uh, no thanks!). Probably like most Americans, I'm much more familiar with his spaghetti westerns and dramas. But this thread has been really educational and re-ignited a Morricone phase smile. I think I will skip watching the films and just appreciate the music as "concept albums" as Thor refers to them.

Yeah, I, too, am not fond of gore flicks, but the horror genre itself has produced many of my favorite soundtracks because the material can inspire composers to utilize advanced techniques from the realms of 20th century/contemporary abstract compositions.

You might want to read this thread (if you haven't already) ... :

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=103061&forumID=1&archive=0

... because there's a lot of Morricone titles on these members' lists which reside within similar aural territory to Bird with the Crystal Plumage. One can enjoy them as concept albums with no particular need to view the movies themselves.


Thanks for directing me to that fine and informative thread, but for now I'm going to just concentrate on the list DougPayne put up a few pages above (which is already almost too much at one go). Morricone is one of those film score gods where, like Goldsmith, Herrmann and Williams, it's almost like they are TOO good for mere mortals to start exploring.

I feel like these thriller/horror scores mentioned here (along with Drammi Gotici) are probably the most dissonant and rhythmically free scores of his. I wonder how Morricone handles science fiction. Could you list Morricone's best sci-fi scores? I can only think of Mission to Mars and The Thing...

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 2:14 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

I picked up the original Cinevox lp - MDF 33/31 - back in the 70s,..

MY COPY WAS ON THE "eNNIO mORRICONE Soundtrack Society" label (or something like that).
Anyone remember that label?
bruce

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 2:17 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)


' I appreciate Morricone best when he is in avant-garde mode or dissonant mode. Morricone's GIALLO scores represent the apex of his achievements in film scoring, ..."

Boy, it is s good thing we never got married!
LOL!
bruce

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 2:21 PM   
 By:   'Lenny Bruce' Marshall   (Member)

I picked up the original Cinevox lp - MDF 33/31 - back in the 70s, and my eyes almost popped out of my head when I saw what a copy went for on Ebay yesterday:

http://cgi.ebay.com/LUCCELLO-DALLE-PIUME-DI-CRISTALLO-Morricone-MINT-LP-/160552341921?pt=Music_on_Vinyl&hash=item2561aa51a1


Must be Riotengine's store

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 2:59 PM   
 By:   On the Rooftops   (Member)

Just a couple points here...
The Capitol records version from 1970 (US version) is a more listener-
friendly rerecording (has Morricone done this before or since?), great
track title in "Black Glove Underground"
The Ennio Morricone Film Score Society (Cerberus Records) was a great
outlet for his lesser-known (to us) scores at the time;I still have my
copies of Bird, The Blue-Eyed Bandit, Tepepa, and When Man is the Prey.
And, Argento's first Giallos (The Bird, Cat O' Nine Tails, 4 Flies on Gray
Velvet) are relatively gore-free, especially compared to the later (IMO
terrific) Deep Red & Suspiria, so don't let that stop you from watching
these cool movies- but I'm glad that people are still discovering these
great Ennio works, Viva Morricone!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Could you list Morricone's best sci-fi scores? I can only think of Mission to Mars and The Thing...

Morricone provided electronic music for 1979's L'Umanoide, which pre-dates the two you mention.
Regarding his large output, Morricone doesn't appear to have been commissioned to write scores regularly for science fiction.
Some of his soundtracks during the early 1970s used early synthesizers and/or electronic keyboards and they sound as though they could be for sci-fi movies but they tend to be for, rather, social-political satires & Kafkaesque curiosities such as for the films directed by Elio Petri (i.e. La Proprieta' non e' piu' un furto)

Both Wolf & Disclosure sound as though they could be sci-fi, as well ...

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 3:55 PM   
 By:   Ed C   (Member)

Could you list Morricone's best sci-fi scores? I can only think of Mission to Mars and The Thing...

Morricone provided electronic music for 1979's L'Umanoide, which pre-dates the two you mention.
Regarding his large output, Morricone doesn't appear to have been commissioned to write scores regularly for science fiction.
Some of his soundtracks during the early 1970s used early synthesizers and/or electronic keyboards and they sound as though they could be for sci-fi movies but they tend to be for, rather, social-political satires & Kafkaesque curiosities such as for the films directed by Elio Petri (i.e. La Proprieta' non e' piu' un furto)

Both Wolf & Disclosure sound as though they could be sci-fi, as well ...


Thanks for this info - I didn't know Morricone wrote classic-era electronic/synthesizer works! Besides "L'Umanoide", "La Proprieta' non e' piu' un furto" (both of which I am going to search for right now), what other scores of his have this aspect (or are heavily electronic)?

BTW I just gave "Chi L'ha Vista Morire" (1972) a spin - again I am floored by Morricone's creativity: traditional Italian children's songs! When I eventually run out of writing blog posts about the favorite scores from my past, I'm half-convinced I should do one devoted solely to Morricone! Of course, my Herrmann and Goldsmith ones will have to surface as well...

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 4:26 PM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

From my memory of L'Uccello Dalle Piume di Cristallo (The Bird with the Crystal Plumage) (1970) I don't recall alot of blood on the screen ... but it is a very stylised film and very much of its time. A lovely main theme which benefits from expansion throughout the score.

I had hoped L'Umanoide (The Humanoid) (1979) would be overlooked ... every mention brings back those wasted minutes watching ... (where are you TG when you're needed?) ... great main theme but the score is a little bit of a challenge.

It's described as Sci-fi, Thriller on IMDb but it may be a little different from what you're seeking ... however, I highly recommend Ecce Homo (I Sopravvissuti) (1969) easily one of the Maestro's best weird scores ... a superb listen which carries you through every minute ... you don't want it to end.

Mitch

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2016 - 10:34 PM   
 By:   Ed C   (Member)

Thanks MusicMad, I'm liking what I'm hearing so far from your suggestions. I also just put on "L'Istruttoria E'Chiusa: Dimentichi", surely another head-scratcher for most, but good for those musique-concrete Parmegiani fans out there smile

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2020 - 1:34 PM   
 By:   J   (Member)

My review
http://www.maintitles.net/reviews/l-uccello-dalle-piume-di-cristallo/

 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2020 - 2:38 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Timely bump, i was playing this on the ipod while i watered the lawn today. Great score.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2020 - 4:02 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

i watered the lawn today.

Listening to the BIRD this time ... instead of ogling her.

 
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