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 Posted:   Jun 11, 2017 - 10:56 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

She was on the opposite train platform. She was reading the book Emotional Intelligence. Just before her train rolled up, we locked eyes for a moment - just a moment - and instead of looking away, she smiled. Then the train separated us and she rode away forever.

 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2017 - 11:31 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Then the train separated us and she rode away forever.

Perhaps, but you can boast about those gorgeous hardwood floors in your home (iirc they were in your blog some years ago).

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2017 - 8:51 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Who is YOUR girl with the white parasol?"

None of your business. But thanks for asking.

I will say this, though. In that same scene, Bernstein has one of my favorite lines in KANE or any other movie, when he's being asked about the unhappiness of C. F. K..

THOMPSON: He made a lot of money.

BERNSTEIN: It's not hard to make a lot of money, if all you want -- is to make a lot of money.


(And Everett Sloane times that little pause just perfectly.)


Leave it to Preston Neal "Classic Beer Commercial Thread Post" Jones to discuss Citizen Kane in a thread about women.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 5:57 AM   
 By:   That Neil Guy   (Member)

Thought of this thread while reading this article.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/02/17/with-the-beatles

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 12:41 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Thought of this thread while reading this article.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/02/17/with-the-beatles


Forget 1964, what about the fact it was way back in 2017 that this thread was last bumped?!? wink

Thanks TNG. Good story that not only conveys a time and place, but also all the little details people remember when you think no one could possibly remember you or events from so long ago.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 12:56 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Three young women from my college days remain strong in my memory - Diane, Nancy, Von. I wish I had kept in touch with them; they were all attractive, nice, intelligent friends.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 1:13 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Three young women from my college days remain strong in my memory - Diane, Nancy, Von. I wish I had kept in touch with them; they were all attractive, nice, intelligent friends.

Take another drag on that Gauloise cigarette, Mark, and regale us further as "your" song plays...(consider this encouragement, not disparagement).

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 1:38 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Three young women from my college days remain strong in my memory - Diane, Nancy, Von. I wish I had kept in touch with them; they were all attractive, nice, intelligent friends.

Take another drag on that Galloise cigarette, Mark, and regale us further as "your" song plays...(consider this encouragement, not disparagement).


Heh. Reading my above post again I realize it sounds awfully dispassionate - "They were all attractive, nice, intelligent friends."

What I mean is that, even if grand romance was not in the cards for me with any of them (I courted Diane with no success; had one encouraging lunch date with Nancy; didn't even ask Von out for a coffee despite her apparent interest in me), I wish that I had remained at least "just friends" with them as they were all highly likable, in-depth individuals. (OK, and that sounds even more emotionless, lol.)

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 1:46 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Apologies for the misspelling of "Gauloise." wink It's since been corrected.

Your recollection is the middle ground between light and shadow, science and superstition...not quite romance, so not grist for the struggling "Typical FSMer...Ruminating Over Love" thread, yet far too familiar for a Scott Walker lyric ("Rosemary") for this thread's purposes, but just as haunting.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 1:57 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Apologies for the misspelling of "Gauloise." wink It's since been corrected.

Your recollection is the middle ground between light and shadow, science and superstition...not quite romance, so not grist for the struggling "Typical FSMer...Ruminating Over Love" thread, yet far too familiar for a Scott Walker lyric ("Rosemary") for this thread's purposes, but just as haunting.


That wishy-washy quality you detect is pretty much why I didn't take a foolish leap into possible love and joy in those halcyon times.

As Jack Shephard said in Lost, "(I) have to go back, Kate, to those blue remembered hills." (Well, Shephard didn't say that last bit; that was Housman.)

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 2:14 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

That wishy-washy quality you detect is pretty much why I didn't take a foolish leap into possible love and joy in those halcyon times.

As Jack Shephard said in Lost, "(I) have to go back, Kate, to those blue remembered hills." (Well, Shephard didn't say that last bit; that was Housman.)


It could be worse: You could be Sterling Hayden at the end of The Asphalt Jungle.

The aforementioned "Rosemary" (I don't expect you'll relate to every lyric in the song--please keep mum about it if you do).



With so many FSMers falling headlong into "late" middle age, perhaps it's time for a "Musical Ennui" thread, or a "Weary Reflections" thread. We--It'll end up being just me and the occasional disinterested Star Wars fan who participates--could populate the topic with songs that express that sense of regret and loss.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 2:37 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

The aforementioned "Rosemary" (I don't expect you'll relate to every lyric in the song--please keep mum about it if you do).

Quite Peter Sarstedt-y.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 2:48 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The aforementioned "Rosemary" (I don't expect you'll relate to every lyric in the song--please keep mum about it if you do).

Quite Peter Sarstedt-y.


I love this stuff.

 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2020 - 2:51 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

"Where Do You Go To My Lovely" - Jason Schwartzmann's pick-up song in Wes Anderson's The Darjeeling Limited.

 
 Posted:   Feb 13, 2020 - 7:39 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Where Do You Go To My Lovely" - Jason Schwartzmann's pick-up song in Wes Anderson's The Darjeeling Limited.

I've never seen a Wes Anderson film. I usually don't go for "quirky." Are his films quirky?

I should probably just see them if only to see Bill Murray in films on a regular basis.

 
 Posted:   Feb 13, 2020 - 9:01 AM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

"Where Do You Go To My Lovely" - Jason Schwartzmann's pick-up song in Wes Anderson's The Darjeeling Limited.

I've never seen a Wes Anderson film. I usually don't go for "quirky." Are his films quirky?

I should probably just see them if only to see Bill Murray in films on a regular basis.


I suppose "quirky" could be one quality found in his films, but there's enough richness and detail to make most of them worth watching. "Darjeeling" is particularly good because, along with the usual whimsy, there is more at stake emotionally (it takes place in India - and the vastness and atmosphere of that country seems to have loosened up Anderson's typical controlled environments.)

 
 Posted:   Feb 14, 2020 - 5:05 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Wes Anderson himself looks like a Woody Allen character as played by Jesse Eisenberg, so based on that alone I "should" enjoy his work.

Okay, back to women with white parasols.

 
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