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Diane (1956)
Music by Miklos Rozsa
Diane Diane
Click to enlarge images.
Price: $9.95
Limited #: 3000
View CD Page at SAE Store
Line: Golden Age
CD Release: March 2004
Catalog #: Vol. 7, No. 3
# of Discs: 2

Released by Special Arrangement with Turner Classic Movies Music

Diane de Poitiers (1499-1566) was the sophisticated mistress of King Henri II of France, who virtually supplanted the Queen for a period of the French Renaissance. In 1956 M-G-M mounted a lavish feature film of her pivotal years, scripted by the formidable author, Christopher Isherwood. Diane was played by Lana Turner, with a young Roger Moore cast as Henri, and colorful faces in the roles of the French and Italian royalty who turn the plot.

Key to M-G-M's grand, historical style was composer Miklós Rózsa, who scored so many costume dramas for the studio: Ivanhoe, Knights of the Round Table (FSMCD Vol. 6, No. 7), Young Bess, and Moonfleet (FSMCD Vol. 6, No. 20), among many others. Diane features manly activities calling for robust, symphonic scoring in the style of Rózsa's adventure music, but it is essentially Diane's tale of the heart: a woman who resists true love for the good of her kingdom. Rózsa responded with a gorgeous melody representing her grace, nobility and romantic yearning; the theme was in fact called "Beauty and Grace" in a popular arrangement.

As was customary for the composer, Rózsa provided Diane with a host of secondary themes, from regal fanfares for the King; to an austere theme for Diane's unloving husband; to darting, menacing motives for the treacherous Italians; to shimmering, choral mysticism for the story's "prophecy" component. He provided French dances for the film's source music, although the score itself concerns the timeless human drama, and is vividly carried by Rózsa symphonic style. It is the kind of score that made fans want to listen to the music—which only took 48 years to happen!

Although not a long score per se, Rózsa recorded so many alternate versions for Diane that it is being released as a 2CD set. Disc one features the score proper, while disc two features alternate cues as well as source music and skeletal "pre-records." Filling out disc two are additional and alternate cues from two other Rózsa historical works: Moonfleet (1955, FSMCD Vol. 6, No. 20) and Plymouth Adventure (1952, FSMCD Vol. 6, No. 1), which would not fit on their earlier FSM editions. This 2CD album thus "closes the book" not only on Diane, but on Moonfleet and Plymouth Adventure.

The release is by and large in stereo, save for certain source tracks, as well as the Plymouth Adventure material, which was recorded in mono.

Miklos Rozsa Scores on FSM
About the Composer

Hungarian-born Miklós Rózsa (1907-1995) is a titan of film music. Responsible for such classic scores as Spellbound, Ben-Hur, King of Kings, El Cid and many others—from biblical epics to 1940s films noir to historical dramas—his signature style is one of the most pleasing and dramatic in film. He was under contract to M-G-M from 1948 to 1962 and FSM has released a great deal of this classic music; also available are his latter-period scores such as The Green Berets and Time After Time.IMDB

Comments (9):Log in or register to post your own comments
I just recently opened this one, and it's quite the treat. Rozsa knew how to do this sort of period "pomp" just right.

And bonus source music from other scores, too!

I just recently opened this one, and it's quite the treat. Rozsa knew how to do this sort of period "pomp" just right.

And bonus source music from other scores, too![/endquote]

A hearty second! An excellent FSM package. Enjoyed the film too.

Love it, a Rozsa smorgasbord. And here's some custom cover art I created, using various posters of wildly differing condition. Took forever and included building the font from scratch, but it was worth the effort.



Love it, a Rozsa smorgasbord. And here's some custom cover art I created, using various posters of wildly differing condition. Took forever and included building the font from scratch, but it was worth the effort.

[/endquote]

Beautiful job! Definitely worth the effort.

The film has merits, although they do not include the smooching costars. Lana was sulking over the nonrenewal of her M-G-M contract and Moore at that stage of his career had the excuse of inexperience. Nor was the "pomp" particularly worthy. It's useful to compare YOUNG BESS, set in the same period and telling an analogous story: love triangle complicated by royal status. The earlier film sticks to the personal characterizations -- all fine actors, effectively directed in tight interiors. There is virtually no "spectacle" except that implied by Rozsa's epilogue. DIANE was pumped up for CinemaScope with fairly meaningless exteriors and plentiful red herrings in the plot. Aside from the music, we may still admire Marisa Pavan's moving performance and Walter Plunkett's magnificent costumes. Note how Diane is almost always seen in black and silver. This is literally because she is usually in mourning for somebody, but symbolically because the colors evoke the moon goddess.

The score is not as finely crafted as YOUNG BESS, but the highlights are incomparable. The last five minutes are one of Rozsa's supreme achievements. The various motives interact and unwind just as beautifully as in BEN-HUR. If the album version needs serious pruning . . . well, that can be said of most film scores. There's much to choose from.

Beautiful job! Definitely worth the effort.[/endquote]

Thank you!

Oh yes, I've been enjoying this for years, along with the FSM Knights Of The Round Table/The Kings Thief (& not forgetting Valley Of The Kings), I can't get over just how good these mid-fifties scores sound, with great stereo (I can't remember ever seeing Diane, if Warner Archive ever released it, I'd have to buy it).

...& all still available!

Another great score from Rozsa. As the detailed liner notes by Lukas point out, there are many themes here as was Rozsa's habit. You'd be lucky to get two decent themes in one of today’s scores!

Another great score from Rozsa. As the detailed liner notes by Lukas point out, there are many themes here as was Rozsa's habit. You'd be lucky to get two decent themes in one of today’s scores![/endquote]

Wrong..........today's scores would render 'no themes' just a lot of jumbled up musical notes

Track List
Instruments/Musicians
Click on each musician name for more credits

Leader (Conductor):
Miklos Rozsa

Violin:
Sam Fiedler, Sam Freed, Jr., Werner L. Gebauer, Sidney Greene, Mort Herbert, Arnold T. Jurasky, Bernard Kundell, Joy Lyle (Sharp), Arthur Maebe, Sr., Lisa Minghetti, Irving Prager, Lou Raderman, Albert Saparoff, Byron Williams

Viola:
Cecil Figelski, Allan Harshman, Virginia Majewski, Reuben Marcus

Cello:
Alexander Borisoff, Julian Kahn, Edgar Lustgarten, Michel Penha

Bass:
George F. Boujie, Louis Previati, Arthur Shapiro

Flute:
Arthur Gleghorn

Oboe:
Philip Memoli

Clarinet:
Gus Bivona, Mort B. Friedman, Alex Gershunoff, Hugo Raimondi, Andrew Young

Bassoon:
Charles A. Gould

French Horn:
John W. "Jack" Cave, Vincent DeRubertis, Herman Lebow

Trumpet:
Uan Rasey, Joe Triscari, James C. Zito

Trombone:
Nick DiMaio, Herb Taylor, Simon Zentner

Piano:
Max Rabinowitsh, Milton Raskin

Organ:
Wesley Tourtellotte

Guitar:
Jack Marshall

Harp:
Catherine Gotthoffer (Johnk)

Drums:
John T. Boudreau, Frank L. Carlson, Mel Pedesky, D. V. Seber

Orchestra Manager:
James C. Whelan

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