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Quartet has announced three new releases by composer Fernando Velazquez (The Impossible, Crimson Peak) - the 2008 true crime drama SAVAGE GRACE, pairing 2014 Oscar winners Julianne Moore and Eddie Redmayne in an unsually dysfunctional mother-son relationship; the horror series ALMA, aka The Girl in the Mirror; and VIENTO, an album of Velazquez's concert music.


Dragon's Domain has announced three upcoming releases: THE ALBERT GLASSER COLLECTION VOL. 5 - SCIENCE FICTION: ATOMIC MUTATION II , featuring Glasser's scores for The Amazing Colossal Man and its sequel War of the Colossal Beast; CRAIG SAFAN: HORROR MACABRE VOL. 1 is a two-disc set featuring Safan's music for the short-lived horror anthology TV series Darkroom (hosted by James Coburn), as well as the music for The Demon's Daughter, a short directed by, of all people, John McTiernan; and John Scott's score for the 1974 thriller SYMPTOMS.


CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Hollywood Soundstage 
- various - Chandos 
Psycho Storm Chaser - Andrew Scott Bell - Howlin' Wolf  
Where the Crawdads Sing - Mychael Danna - Decca 


IN THEATERS TODAY

Barbarian - Anna Drubich
Loving Highsmith - Noel Akchote
Medieval - Philip Klein
Mysterious Circumstance: The Death of Meriwether Lewis - Dalton Grant
Private Desert - Felipe Ayres
The Retaliators - Kyle Dixon, Michael Stein - Song CD due Sept 16 on Bitter Noise


COMING SOON

September 16
Beavis and Butthead Do the Universe - John Frizzell - La-La Land
Bridgerton: Season Two - Kris Bowers - Capitol
Cobra Kai: Season 5 - Leo Birenberg, Zach Robinson - La-La Land
Goldsmith at 20th Vol 5: Music for Television 1968-1975  - Jerry Goldsmith - La-La Land
The Gravedigger's Wife
 - Andre Matthias - Kronos
September 30
The Innocents - Pessi Levanto - Svart
October 14 
Firestarter - John Carpenter, Jody Carpenter, Daniel Davies - Sacred Bones
Coming Soon
The Albert Glasser Collection Vol. 5 - Science Fiction: Atomic Mutation II
- Albert Glasser - Dragon's Domain
Alma (The Girl in the Mirror)
- Fernando Velazquez - Quartet
Claret
 - Oscar Martin Leanizabarrutia - Kronos
Craig Safan: Horror Macabre Vol. 1
- Craig Safan - Dragon's Domain
The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power - Bear McCreary - Mondo
Motorcycle Gang
 - Albert Glasser - Kronos
Nope - Michael Abels - Waxwork
The Proud and Damned
 - Gene Kauer, Douglas M. Lackey - Kronos 
Savage Grace
- Fernando Velazquez - Quartet
Suoni Velati
 -  Matteo Cremolini - Kronos  
Symptoms
- John Scott - Dragon's Domain
Viento
- Fernando Velazquez - Quartet


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

September 9 - Hoyt Curtin born (1922)
September 9 - Jerrold Immel born (1936)
September 9 - Bernard Herrmann begins recording score cues for Hangover Square (1944)
September 9 - Christopher Palmer born (1946)
September 9 - David A. Stewart born (1952)
September 9 - Bernard Herrmann begins recording his score to Beneath the 12-Mile Reef (1953)
September 9 - Eric Serra born (1959)
September 9 - Alex North begins recording his score to The Shoes of the Fisherman (1968)
September 9 - Richard Markowitz records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “The Numbers Game” (1969)
September 9 - Harry Geller records his only Mission: Impossible score, for the episode “The Innocent” (1970)
September 9 - Harry Escott born (1976)
September 9 - Hugo Friedhofer's score for Die Sister, Die! is recorded (1976)
September 9 - Joey Newman born (1976)
September 9 - Recording sessions begin for Philippe Sarde’s score to Ghost Story (1981)
September 9 - David Shire begins recording his score for The Journey Inside (1993)
September 9 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Anomaly” (2003)
September 9 - Michael Galasso died (2009)
September 9 - Michael Stein and Kyle Dixon win the Emmy for Stranger Things main title theme; Jeff Beal wins for House of Cards’ “Chapter 63;” Jeff Russo wins for the Fargo episode “Aporia” (2017)
September 10 - Arnold Schwarzwald born (1918)
September 10 - Johnny Keating born (1927)
September 10 - Hugo Riesenfeld died (1939)
September 10 - Roy Ayers born (1940)
September 10 - Jack Beaver died (1963)
September 10 - Les Baxter records his score for the U.S. release of Black Sabbath (1963)
September 10 - Richard Shores records his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Sedgewick Curse” (1968)
September 10 - Richard LaSalle records his score for the Land of the Giants episode “The Unsuspected” (1969)
September 10 - Allan Gray died (1973)
September 10 - Laurence Rosenthal records his score for 21 Hours at Munich (1976)
September 10 - Bruce Broughton records his score for the Amazing Stories episode "Welcome to My Nightmare" (1986)
September 10 - Laurence Rosenthal wins his sixth Emmy, for Young Indiana Jones and the Hollywood Follies; Don Davis wins his second Emmy, for the SeaQuest DSV episode “Daggers;” Jerry Goldsmith wins his fifth and final Emmy, for the Star Trek: Voyager theme (1995)
September 10 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “A Time to Stand” (1997)
September 10 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Enterprise episode “Shockwave, Part 2” (2002)
September 10 - Carter Burwell wins the Emmy for part 5 of Mildred Pierce; Trevor Morris wins his second Emmy, for The Borgias’ main title theme; Garth Neustadter wins for the American Masters episode “John Muir in the New World” (2011)
September 10 - Gert Wilden died (2015)
September 10 - Sean Callery wins his fourth Emmy, for the theme to Marvel’s Jessica Jones; Mac Quayle wins his first Emmy, for the Mr. Robot episode score “eps1.0_ hellofriend.mov;” Danny Elfman wins his second Emmy, for his music direction of Danny Elfman’s Music from the Films of Tim Burton; Victor Reyes wins his first Emmy, for The Night Manager episode 2 (2016)
September 11 - Herbert Stothart born (1885)
September 11 - Arvo Part born (1935)
September 11 - Leo Kottke born (1945)
September 11 - Hugo Friedhofer begins recording his score to Between Heaven and Hell (1956)
September 11 - Stu Philips begins recording his replacement score to The Appointment (1969)
September 11 - Gerald Fried and Quincy Jones win the Emmy for Part 1 of Roots; Leonard Rosenman and Alan & Marilyn Bergman win for Sybil (1977)
September 11 - Fred Steiner records his only Star Trek: The Next Generation episode score, for “Code of Honor” (1987)
September 11 - Laurence Rosenthal wins his fifth Emmy, for the Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode “Vienna, 1908;” Lennie Niehaus wins for the cable movie Lush Life; John Debney wins for his SeaQuest DSV main title theme (1994)
September 11 - Bruce Broughton wins his ninth Emmy, for Warm Springs (2005); Michael Giacchino wins for the Lost pilot score; Danny Elfman wins for Desperate Housewives’s main title theme (2005)
September 11 - Antoine Duhamel died (2014)
September 12 - Wolfgang Zeller born (1893)
September 12 - Gavriil Popov born (1904)
September 12 - David Raksin begins recording his score for Laura (1944)
September 12 - Christopher Dedrick born (1947)
September 12 - Hans Zimmer born (1957)
September 12 - Bernard Herrmann records his score for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode “Terror at Northfield” (1963)
September 12 - Lalo Schifrin begins recording his score to Bullitt (1968)
September 12 - Nathan Larson born (1970)
September 12 - Jerry Goldsmith wins his fourth Emmy, for part 2 of Masada; Bruce Broughton wins his first Emmy, for “The Satyr” episode of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (1981)
September 12 - Franz Grothe died (1982)
September 12 - Patrick Williams wins his second Emmy, for the TV movie The Princess and the Cabbie; David Rose wins for the Little House on the Prairie episode score “He Was Only Twelve – Part 2” (1981)
September 12 - Recording sessions begin for Pino Donaggio's Body Double score (1984)
September 12 - William Alwyn died (1985)
September 12 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Darmok” (1991)
September 12 - Bruce Broughton wins his eighth Emmy, for Eloise at Christmastime; Velton Ray Bunch wins for the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Similitude;” Randy Newman wins for Monk’s second season main title theme (2004)
September 12 - John Willliams wins the Main Title Theme Emmy for Great Performances; Howard Goodall wins for the cable movie Into the Storm; Joseph LoDuca wins for the Legend of the Seeker episode “The Prophecy” (2009)
September 12 - Rachel Portman wins her first Emmy, for Bessie; Jeff Beal wins for House of Cards, “Chapter 32;” Dustin O’Halloran wins for Transparent’s main title theme (2015)
September 13 - Leith Stevens born (1909)
September 13 - Maurice Jarre born (1924)
September 13 - Gene Page born (1939)
September 13 - Harvey R. Cohen born (1951)
September 13 - Don Was was born (1952)
September 13 - David Mansfield born (1956)
September 13 - Franz Waxman begins recording his score to Beloved Infidel (1959)
September 13 - Bernard Herrmann records his score for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode "A Home Away from Home" (1963)
September 13 - Evan Evans born (1975)
September 13 - James Guymon born (1977)
September 13 - Billy Goldenberg wins his fourth Emmy, for Rage of Angels; Bruce Broughton wins his second Emmy, for the Dallas episode “The Ewing Blues” (1983)
September 13 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Tinker Tenor Doctor Spy” (1999)
September 13 - Bruce Broughton wins his seventh Emmy, for Eloise at the Plaza; Sean Callery wins for the 24 episode “10:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.”; Jeff Beal wins his first Emmy, for Monk’s main title theme (2003)
September 13 - Jeff Beal wins his third Emmy, for part 1 of The Company; Jim Dooley wins for the Pushing Daisies episode “Pigeon;” Russ Landau wins for Pirate Master’s main title theme (2008)
September 14 - Franz Waxman begins recording his score to Cimarron (1960)
September 14 - John Williams records his score for the Lost in Space episode "Island in the Sky" (1965)
September 14 - Sol Kaplan's score to the Star Trek episode "The Enemy Within" is recorded (1966)
September 14 - Gerald Fried records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “Odds on Evil” (1966)
September 14 - Recording sessions begin for Danny Elfman’s score for Scrooged (1988)
September 14 - Alan Silvestri begins recording his score for Back to the Future Part II (1989)
September 14 - Laurence Rosenthal wins his seventh Emmy, for The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode “Travels with Father;” John Debney and Louis Febre win for the pilot episode to The Cape; Mark Isham wins for his main title theme to EZ Streets (1997)
September 14 - George Fenton wins his first Emmy, for the Blue Planet episode “Seas of Life: Ocean World;” Adrian Johnston wins for Shackleton Part II; Thomas Newman wins for the Six Feet Under main title theme (2002)
September 14 - Marco Beltrami and Brandon Roberts win the documentary score Emmy for Free Solo (2019)
September 15 - Gail Kubik born (1914)
September 15 - Shinichiro Ikebe born (1943)
September 15 - Recording sessions begin for Bronsislau Kaper's score for The Naked Spur (1952)
September 15 - Leigh Harline begins recording his score for Visit to a Small Planet (1959)
September 15 - Oliver Wallace died (1963)
September 15 - Sol Kaplan begins recording his score for The Spy Who Came in from The Cold (1965)
September 15 - Alexander Courage records his score for the Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea episode “The Cyborg” (1965)
September 15 - Artie Kane records his score for the Land of the Giants episode “Collector’s Item” (1969)
September 15 - Don Ellis begins recording his score for The Deadly Tower (1975)
September 15 - Jerry Fielding begins recording his score for The Black Bird (1975)
September 15 - Bruce Montgomery died (1978)
September 15 - Leonard Rosenman begins recording his score for Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986)
September 15 - Ron Jones records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Evolution" (1989)
September 15 - Don Davis wins his first Emmy, for the Beauty and the Beast episode score “A Time to Kill; James Di Pasquale wins for the TV movie The Shell Seekers (1990)
September 15 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Non Sequitur” (1995)
September 15 - Aldemaro Romero died (2007)
September 15 - Javier Navarrete wins the Emmy for Hemingway & Gellhorn; John Lunn wins for episode 6 of Downton Abbey; Paul Englishby wins for Page Eight’s main title theme (2012)
September 15 - Bear McCreary wins his first Emmy, for Da Vinci’s Demons’ main title theme; John Lunn wins for episode 3.6 of Downton Abbey; Mychael Danna wins for the World Without End episode “Medieval Life and Death” (2013)
September 15 - Hildur Guonadottir wins the Emmy for her Chernobyl score; Ramin Djawadi wins for the Game of Thrones episode score “The Long Night” (2019)
DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

THE AVIARY - Zac Clark
 
"While the drama mostly stays insular, the filmmakers give it a grander scope in their imagery. They exercise gorgeous visual dexterity, allowing aesthetic flourishes to complement their themes. Mind-melting nightmare sequences, featuring flashing lights, disarming static shots and unsettling jump cuts, visually contextualize their characters’ tormented, fractured psyches. Cinematographer Elie Smolkin, editor David Bilow, and the sound design team conduct an electrifying charge during these character-driven and destabilizing segments. Zac Clark’s score plays like a creepy lullaby, lulling us into a false sense of safety."
 
Courtney Howard, The Onion AV Club 

"There’s a cool DIY quality about 'The Aviary,' which eschews CGI and other FX to convey Jillian and Blair’s deteriorating (or is it simply 'deteriorated'?) state of mind. For example, late in the movie, a two-shot frames the talking women as they walk in the midday heat when the camera unexpectedly pans over to Jillian, only to quickly swing back to Blair’s position and reveal Seth as the other conversant, with the trick repeated in vice-versa fashion. It’s a deceptively simple technique, but one with unsettling effect. Ackerman and Izzo hold their own in what is essentially a two-character film, though their portrayals seem interchangeable, likely because the programmed women they play have little sense of individuality. But they and the movie are eventually undermined by an ever-exhausting concept that might have worked better as an hourlong episode in an anthology series. With a little fine-tuning, the ending would have packed a bigger wallop in a truncated version eliminating a coda that only serves to explain the title. But regardless of the length or format, you could easily do without Zac Clark’s monotonic humming score, which annoys more than it communicates tension or dread. It’s the aural equivalent of a gnat buzzing in your ear. Shoo!"
 
Steve Davis, The Austin Chronicle 

EMILY THE CRIMINAL - Nathan Halpern
 
"Turns out, Youcef and his cousin Khalil’s (Jonathan Avigdori) operation is pretty sophisticated, and Emily has a knack. She impresses Youcef on her first gig enough to ask her back for a bigger one the next day; she proves her mettle in heart-pounding fashion. The film has drawn early comparisons to 'Drive,' and while the downtown LA setting and pulsating score from Nathan Halpern fit, Ford and Plaza offer something a bit trickier. It’s also more satisfying, blending style with a timely message about the way capitalism beats down people just looking to make some honest cash, the way a criminal past can mark someone for life, the way it’s impossible to move past certain circumstances."
 
Kate Erbland, IndieWire 

"But whatever Emily may represent sociologically, she is first and foremost a figure of sustained and highly specific dramatic interest. One of the pleasures of Plaza’s performance is the way she shows us a person working out her fight-or-flight instincts in real time, and in ever more dangerous transactional situations. We see Emily’s caution and recklessness duke it out when she’s confronted by a suspicious car dealer or, in an especially harrowing episode, a knife-wielding robber. We also savor her growing satisfaction when, with Youcef’s help, she launches her own racket, printing the credit cards, picking up the merchandise and arranging the resales herself. All this takes place on an array of almost palpably unlovely Los Angeles locations, filmed here with a restless run-and-gun immediacy. (Ford’s skilled collaborators include Jeff Bierman, who handled the movie’s handheld cinematography, and Nathan Halpern, who composed the steadily pulsing score.)"
 
Justin Chang, Los Angeles Times
 
"But even when violence ensues at Emily’s second job, the cash she earns makes it worth the risk. In fact, she’s hooked -- on the money, perhaps on the danger, and eventually on Youcef himself. Thanks to the defiant ferocity of Plaza’s performance, plus Nathan Halpern’s tense music throbbing through each increasingly precarious transaction, we’re rooting for Emily to exploit capitalism’s loopholes. There’s a sick thrill in seeing someone cheat the system and say things like, 'Motherf*ckers will keep taking from you and taking from you until you make the goddamn rules yourself.' After all, no one gets hurt from credit card fraud."
 
Jack Smart, The Onion AV Club 

"Emily and Youcef are united in that they’re both ambitious young people with small scale goals. Neither is out to rule the L.A. crime syndicate; they just want enough cash to feel free. Here, people like them without good options live lives that are already behind invisible bars. To Ford, choosing crime can be suspenseful -- when things get tense, Nathan Halpern’s music takes on the tempo of a nervous heartbeat -- but it’s not necessarily wrong if the audience can be convinced that Emily is simply defending her own right to survive."
 
Amy Nicholson, Variety 

FATHER OF THE BRIDE - Terence Blanchard
 
"Also enriching the picture is the sisterly bond between Cora and Sofia, two inspiring young women who become a little closer to one another as they grow to appreciate and enable each other’s differences. The end result of all this is a little 'My Big Fat Greek Wedding' and a little 'Crazy Rich Asians' in spirit; an opulent package elevated by costume designer Caroline Eselin Schaefer’s lavish work -- Sofia’s midriff-baring suits are especially stunning -- composer Terence Blanchard’s rich score of jazzy rhythms and cinematographer Igor Jadue-Lillo’s committed lens that advances the film’s stormy finale through dizzyingly mazy, single-take camerawork."
 
Tomris Laffly, The Onion AV Club 
 
"Stylistically, what stands out is how intently Alazraki and cinematographer Igor Jadue-Lillo ('Four Good Days') make sure that their sun-dappled Miami locations get appreciated on screen, even if at times excessively. Postcard-ready vistas of Calle Ocho and Ocean Drive parade across the screen to Terence Blanchard’s jazzy score. That nurtured sense of place ties to the narrative in the third act, when the city’s propensity for rough weather coming from the Caribbean adds drama."
 
Carlos Aguilar, The Wrap 

GOOD LUCK TO YOU, LEO GRANDE - Stephen Rennicks

"The hotel room set partly recalls 'The Father' and 'The Souvenir Part II,' simultaneously naturalistic and -- one senses movie magic at work -- not at all claustrophobic. It’s an intimately scaled film that still demands to be seen on the big screen; never once does it leave the impression that it would be best suited for a streaming platform. Hyde’s refined and attentive direction, Bryan Manson’s crystal clear cinematography, and Stephen Rennicks’ sparkling score have done wonders cultivating the sensual tone and texture."
 
Martin Tsai, The Wrap 
 
"Thompson’s neurotic is alternately sympathetic and aggravating. Her Nancy tips over into comedy -- there’s a negligee gag that’s played for an easy laugh -- and the score can get overly playful, as though it, too, is anxious to put the audience at ease. Yet, Nancy’s lust is never the joke. Thompson commits to revealing the full woman, quite literally...Once Leo enters the hotel, the film never leaves. We become hyper-aware of the sound of socks on carpet and hands rustling over shirt collars and hair. Leo and Nancy’s hotel room begins to feel like sacred ground. (Composer Stephen Rennicks isn’t above adding music that harkens to a religious choir). 'There are nuns out there with more sexual experience than me,' Nancy quips. Yes, but here, pleasure is both sacred and practical, a wobbly balance that seduces the audience, too."
 
Amy Nicholson, Variety 

THE LEGEND OF MOLLY JOHNSON - Salliana Seven Campbell

"For the first half of the film, it plays like a classic Western, with a cast of recognizable archetypes: the 'good' cop and bumbling sidekick, the misunderstood fugitive, the spunky young wife. One exception is the well-drawn Molly herself, played subtly and with heartbreaking emotional control by director Leah Purcell. Unfortunately, the story drags for the first half of the film, and the downright cheesy score and ending song disrupt scenes that could have carried the emotional weight better on their own."
 
Lina Fisher, The Austin Chronicle 
 
"On the craft side, she gets valuable support from the dramatic visuals of cinematographer Mark Wareham and the flavorful if overused score for strings and piano by Salliana Seven Campbell. Purcell deserves credit for the complexity of this multilayered story, but her directing experience has mainly been on stage and in episodic television, and the sweep for which she’s aiming remains out of her reach. Moments in which the spirit of Molly’s mother appears, her hair billowing in the wind like she’s a refugee from an ’80s Russell Mulcahy music video, are particularly ill-considered."
 
David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter
 
VENGEANCE - Finneas O'Connell
 
"Still, there are bits and pieces of 'Vengeance' that show Novak’s talents as both a writer and a director, and it’s easy to see how this could’ve been a stellar debut from Novak. When he hits one of those platitudes, and it works, it really works. Novak and cinematographer Lyn Moncrief makes these sprawling areas of Texas gorgeous to look at, and the music by Finneas O’Connell plays well with the tension of the story. There’s promise, but 'Vengeance' at times feels like a West Texas version of 'Under the Silver Lake,' but without the focus and care. Unfortunately, Ben’s editor was right, Vengeance is more a theory than a story."
 
Ross Bonaime, Collider 

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films in Los Angeles-area theaters.

September 9
BEAU TRAVAIL (
Charles Henri de Pierrefeu, Eran Tzur) [Aero]
COCO (Michael Giacchino) [El Capitan]
CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON [Alamo Drafthouse] 
THE DARK KNIGHT (Hans Zimmer, James Newton Howard) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
DOG DAY AFTERNOON [BrainDead Studios]
THE GODFATHER PART II (Nino Rota, Carmine Coppola) [Alamo Drafthouse]
JOHN WICK (Tyler Bates, Joel J. Richard) [Nuart]
THE KILLER (Lowell Lowe) [New Beverly]  
LANCELOT DU LAC (Philippe Sarde) [Los Feliz 3]
MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL (DeWolfe) [Alamo Drafthouse]
A MAN ESCAPED [Los Feliz 3]
MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO (Joe Hisaishi) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
NO WAY OUT (Alfred Newman), NATIVE SON (John Elhert) [Academy Museum]
PULP FICTION [New Beverly]
THE SHINING (Wendy Carlos, Rachel Elkind) [Landmark Westwood]
WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER (Theodore Shapiro, Craig Wedren) [BrainDead Studios]
XANADU (John Farrar, Jeff Lynne, Barry DeVorzon) [New Beverly]

September 10
COCO (Michael Giacchino) [El Capitan]

CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE DARK KNIGHT (Hans Zimmer, James Newton Howard) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
DAS BOOT (Klaus Doldinger) [Aero]
DOUBLE INDEMNITY (Miklos Rozsa) [BrainDead Studios]
GET OUT (Michael Abels) [Landmark Westwood]
HOLLYWOOD OR BUST (Walter Scharf) [Los Feliz 3]

HUGO & JOSEPHINE (Torbjorn Lundquist) [Aero]
THE IRON GIANT (Michael Kamen) [New Beverly]
JACKASS 3D [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE KILLER (Lowell Lowe) [New Beverly]  
LANCELOT DU LAC (Philippe Sarde) [Los Feliz 3]
THE MUMMY (Jerry Goldsmith) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
ODDS AGAINST TOMORROW (John Lewis), THE WORLD, THE FLESH AND THE DEVIL (Miklos Rozsa) [Academy Museum]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart]
SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE (Marc Shaiman) [Los Feliz 3]
SUMMER STOCK (Harry Warren, Johnny Green, Saul Chaplin) [Academy Museum]
SUNSHINE (John Murphy) [BrainDead Studios]
THE TRIAL OF JOAN OF ARC (Francis Seyrig) [Los Feliz 3]
THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN PART 1 (Carter Burwell), THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN PART 2 (Carter Burwell) [Alamo Drafthouse]
2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY [Landmark Westwood]
WAKE IN FRIGHT [OUTBACK] (John Scott) [BrainDead Studios]
WES CRAVEN'S NEW NIGHTMARE (J. Peter Robinson) [New Beverly]

September 11
BARRY LYNDON (Leonard Rosenman) [Landmark Westwood]
THE CHINA SYNDROME [Academy Museum]

COCO (Michael Giacchino) [El Capitan] 
THE CONVERSATION (David Shire) [Alamo Drafthouse]
CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON [Alamo Drafthouse] 
GET SHORTY (John Lurie) [Los Feliz 3]
THE GODFATHER PART II (Nino Rota, Carmine Coppola) [Alamo Drafthouse]
GREASE, XANADU (John Farrar, Jeff Lynne, Barry DeVorzon) [Aero]
HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF-BLOOD PRINCE (Nicholas Hooper) [Fine Arts]
INDEPENDENCE DAY (David Arnold) [BrainDead Studios]
THE IRON GIANT (Michael Kamen) [New Beverly]
THE KILLER (Lowell Lowe) [New Beverly] 
L'ARGENT [Los Feliz 3]
LES DAMES DE BOIS DE BOULOUGNE (Jean-Jacques Grunenwald) [Los Feliz 3]
MIDSOMMAR (Bobby Krlic) [BrainDead Studios]
MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL (DeWolfe) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
THE MUMMY (Jerry Goldsmith) [Alamo Drafthouse]  
THE NEON DEMON (Cliff Martinez) [Los Feliz 3]
ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (Ennio Morricone) [BrainDead Studios]
THE UNTOUCHABLES (Ennio Morricone) [Fine Arts] 

September 12
THE CONVERSATION (David Shire) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE DEVIL, PROBABLY (Philippe Sarde) [Los Feliz 3]
THE GODFATHER PART II (Nino Rota, Carmine Coppola) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
JACKASS 3D [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH (John Phillips) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE MUMMY (Jerry Goldsmith) [Alamo Drafthouse]
MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO (Joe Hisaishi) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SUMMER SCHOOL (Danny Elfman) [Los Feliz 3]
WOMEN IN CAGES, THE BIG DOLL HOUSE (William A. Castleman, William Loose) [New Beverly]

September 13
BROWN SUGAR (Robert Hurst) [Los Feliz 3]
THE CONVERSATION (David Shire) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE GODFATHER PART II (Nino Rota, Carmine Coppola) [Alamo Drafthouse]
LES DAMES DU BOIS DE BOULOUGNE (Jean-Jacques Grunenwald) [Los Feliz 3]
MODEL SHOP, HOLLYWOOD 90028 (Basil Poledouris) [New Beverly]
TOY STORY (Randy Newman) [Academy Museum]

September 14
THE CONVERSATION (David Shire) [Alamo Drafthouse]
DR. STRANGELOVE OR: HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB (Laurie Johnson) [Landmark Westwood]
8 1/2 WOMEN [Los Feliz 3]
SOMETHING NEW (Wendy Melvoin, Lisa Coleman) [Los Feliz 3]
X (Tyler Bates, Chelsea Wolfe) [New Beverly]

September 15
AU HASARD BALTHAZAR (Jean Wiener), MOUCHETTE (Jean Wiener) [Aero]
BLADE (Mark Isham) [Los Feliz 3]
CAR WASH (Norman Whitfield), THANK GOD IT'S FRIDAY [New Beverly]
THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (Hans Zimmer) [Alamo Drafthouse]
X (Tyler Bates, Chelsea Wolfe) [Alamo Drafthouse]

September 16
CAR WASH (Norman Whitfield), THANK GOD IT'S FRIDAY [New Beverly] 
CHAN IS MISSING (Robert Kikuchi-Yngojo), SLAMDANCE (Mitchell Froom) [UCLA/Hammer]
CRIES AND WHISPERS [BrainDead Studios]
DEMOLITION MAN (Elliot Goldenthal) [New Beverly]
FUNNY PEOPLE (Michael Andrews) [BrainDead Studios]
THE GODFATHER (Nino Rota) [Hollywood Legion]
L'ARGENT [Los Feliz 3]
A MAN ESCAPED [Los Feliz 3]
PULP FICTION [New Beverly]

September 17
THE BATWOMAN [Alamo Drafthouse]
CORALINE (Bruno Coulais) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE CRAFT (Graeme Revell) [New Beverly]
THE DEVIL, PROBABLY (Philippe Sarde) [Los Feliz 3]
DONNIE DARKO (Michael Andrews) [BrainDead Studios]
ELECTION (Rolfe Kent) [BrainDead Studios]
HOUSE PARTY (Marcus Miller, Lenny White) [Los Feliz 3]
THE ICE STORM (Mychael Danna) [BrainDead Studios]
LIFE IS CHEAP...BUT TOILET PAPER IS EXPENSIVE (Mark Adler), CHINESE BOX (Graeme Revell) [UCLA/Hammer]
MARIO PUZO'S THE GODFATHER, CODA: THE DEATH OF MICHAEL CORLEONE (Carmine Coppola) [Alamo Drafthouse]
MY BLUE HEAVEN (Ira Newborn) [Los Feliz 3]
MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO (Joe Hisaishi) [New Beverly]
THE ONE-ARMED EXECUTIONER (Gene Kauer), BLIND RAGE (Tito Sotto) [New Beverly]
PET SEMATARY (Elliot Goldenthal) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
THE PRINCESS BRIDE (Mark Knopfler) [Landmark Westwood]

September 18
BARBERSHOP (Terence Blanchard) [IPIC Westwood]
CORALINE (Bruno Coulais) [Alamo Drafthouse]
DARLING (John Dankworth) [Los Feliz 3]
DAUGHTER OF SHANGHAI [UCLA/Hammer]
THE GENERAL [Hollywood Legion]
A GENTLE WOMAN (Jean Wiener) [Los Feliz 3]
HALLOWEEN (John Carpenter) [BrainDead Studios]
HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1 (Alexandre Desplat) [Fine Arts]
HELLRAISER (Christopher Young), HELLBOUND: HELLRAISER II (Christopher Young) [Aero]
MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO (Joe Hisaishi) [New Beverly]
THE ONE-ARMED EXECUTIONER (Gene Kauer), BLIND RAGE (Tito Sotto) [New Beverly] 
PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED (John Barry) [Alamo Drafthouse]
PLACES IN THE HEART (John Kander) [Academy Museum]
THE SIXTH SENSE (James Newton Howard) [BrainDead Studios]
SLEEPY HOLLOW (Danny Elfman) [BrainDead Studios]
SMOKE (Rachel Portman), BLUE IN THE FACE [Aero]
THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Heard:
Ghost Story (Sarde); Who Can Kill a Child?/The House That Screamed (De Los Rios); A Ghost Story (Hart); Howling of the Devil (Garcia Morcillo); Ghostbusters (Bernstein); The Orphanage (Velazquez); Ghostbusters II (Edelman); Pan's Labyrinth (Navarrete); Ghostbusters (Shapiro); [REC] 3: Genesis (Salas); Ghostbusters: Afterlife (Simonsen); [REC] 4: Apocalypse (Bataller); Gothika (Ottman); Santa Sangre (Boswell); The Grudge (Young); The Similars (Lan); The Grudge 2 (Young)

Read: Autopsy, by John R. Feegel

Seen: Pickpocket; Diary of a Country Priest; Funny Pages; Peter Von Kant; Fire of Love

Watched: What We Do in the Shadows ("Resurrection"); The Boys ("The Big Ride"); You're the Worst ("LCD Soundsystem"); Counterpart ("The Sincerest Form of Flattery"); The Venture Bros. ("Momma's Day"); Damages ("Don't Forget to Thank Mr. Zedeck"); 30 Rock ("Senor Macho Solo"); The Deuce ("I See Money"); The Seven-per-cent Solution; The Expanse ("CQB")
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Today in Film Score History:
September 25
Alan Silvestri begins recording his score for The Bodyguard (1992)
Danny Elfman and Steve Bartek's score for the Amazing Stories episode "Mummy Daddy" is recorded (1985)
Dmitri Shostakovich born (1906)
Eric Rogers born (1921)
Jay Chattaway records his score for the Enterprise episode “Fight or Flight” (2001)
Michael Gibbs born (1937)
Randy Kerber born (1958)
Richard Harvey born (1953)
Rod Temperton died (2016)
Ron Jones records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Where No One Has Gone Before" (1987)
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