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The latest CD from Intrada is an expanded and remastered edition of James Horner's score for the 1983 film version of Ray Bradbury's fantasy-horror classic SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, directed by Jack Clayton and starring Jason Robards, Jonathan Pryce and Pam Grier. Intrada released the earlier edition of Horner's score as well as Georges Delerue's unused score for the film.

Music Box has announced two new releases: the seventh volume in their series LES B.O. INTROUVABLES, featuring rare scores from French cinema, this one featuring scores by Jean Bouchety (Les furrieries de Scapin), Dominique Perrier & Sam Bernett (Le fou de roi), Karl-Heinz Schafter (Exterieur, Nuit; Polar), and Jean Musy (Les fausses confidences; Le coeur a l'envers; Le bahut va craquer); and ALEXEI AIGUI - FILM MUSIC COLLECTION, featuring cues from eight scores by the composer of the Oscar-nominated documentary I Am Not Your Negro.


BAFTA, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, has announced their nominations for this year's film awards, including for Original Score:

KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON - Robbie Robertson
OPPENHEIMER - Ludwig Göransson
POOR THINGS - Jerskin Fendrix
SALTBURN - Anthony Willis
SPIDER-MAN: ACROSS THE SPIDER-VERSE - Daniel Pemberton 

The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences has announced this year's Creative Emmy winners, including the following music categories: 

OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A LIMITED OR ANTHOLOGY SERIES, MOVIE OR SPECIAL (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
 
WEIRD: THE AL YANKOVIC STORY - Leo Birenberg, Zach Robinson
 
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A SERIES (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
 
THE WHITE LOTUS: "In the Sandbox" - Cristobal Tapia de Veer
 
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION FOR A DOCUMENTARY SERIES OR SPECIAL (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)
 
STILL: A MICHAEL J. FOX MOVIE - John Powell
 
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MAIN TITLE THEME MUSIC
 
WEDNESDAY - Danny Elfman
 
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MUSIC AND LYRICS
 
TED LASSO: "So Long, Farewell" - "A Beautiful Game" - Music and Lyrics by Ed Sheeran, Fox Vance, Max Martin
 
MUSIC DIRECTION
 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS GERSHWIN PRIZE FOR POPULAR SONG: JONI MITCHELL - Greg Phillinganes
 
OUTSTANDING MUSIC SUPERVISION
 
THE WHITE LOTUS: "Bull Elephants" - Gabe Hilfer

Ludwig Goransson won this year's Golden Globe for Original Score for OPPENHEIMER, and Billie Eilish and Finneas O'Connell won Original Song for Barbie's "WHAT WAS I MADE FOR?"

CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Live and Let Die
 - George Martin - La-La Land
Silent Night
 - Marco Beltrami - La-La Land 
Something Wicked This Way Comes - James Horner - Intrada Special Collection


IN THEATERS TODAY

Bye Bye Tiberias - Amin Bouhafa
Cult Killer - Gerry Owens
Double Down South - Adam Berry
Founders Day - Tim Williams
I.S.S. - Anne Nikitin
Which Brings Me to You - Spencer David Hutchings


COMING SOON

Coming Soon
Alexei Aigui - Film Music Collection
- Alexei Aigui - Music Box
Cutthroat Island
 - John Debney - Quartet
Hic et Nunc
 - Pascal Gaigne - Quartet
Les B.O. Introuvables Vol. 7
- Sam Bernett, Jean Bouchety, Jean Musy, Dominique Perrier, Karl-Heinz Shafter - Music Box 
Octopussy
 - John Barry - La-La Land


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

January 19 - Gerard Schurmann born (1924)
January 19 - Stu Phillips born (1929)
January 19 - Michael Boddicker born (1953)
January 19 - Jerome Moross begins recording his score to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1960)
January 19 - Recording sessions begin for Cyril Mockidge’s score to The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)
January 19 - John Williams records his score for The Ghostbreaker (1965)
January 19 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording electronic cues for Logan's Run (1976)
January 19 - Don Costa died (1983)
January 19 - David Shire records his score for the Amazing Stories episode "Moving Day" (1987) 
January 19 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Life Support” (1995)
January 19 - Bjorn Isfalt died (1997)
January 20 - Emil Newman born (1911)
January 20 - Recording sessions begin for Miklos Rozsa's score for Double Indemnity (1944)
January 20 - John Beal born (1947)
January 20 - Franz Waxman begins recording his score to Untamed (1955)
January 20 - Bronislau Kaper begins recording his score to The Prodigal (1955)
January 20 - Pedro Bromfman born (1976)
January 20 - Paul Ben Haim died (1984)
January 20 - Christopher Young’s scores for the Twilight Zone episodes “A Matter of Minutes” and  “A Small Talent for War” are recorded (1986)
January 20 - Basil Poledouris records his score for the Twilight Zone episode “Monsters!” (1986)
January 20 - Gerry Mulligan died (1996)
January 20 - Recording sessions begin for John Powell’s score to Agent Cody Banks (2003)
January 20 - Edgar Froese died (2015)
January 21 - Bernard Herrmann records his score for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode “An Unlocked Window” (1965)
January 21 - Peer Raben died (2007)
January 22 - Sid Ramin born (1919)
January 22 - J.J. Johnson born (1924)
January 22 - Al Kasha born (1937)
January 22 - Miklos Rozsa begins recording his score for The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946)
January 22 - Velton Ray Bunch born (1948)
January 22 - Keith Forsey born (1948)
January 22 - Ben Mink born (1951)
January 22 - Marc Blitzstein died (1964)
January 22 - Alexander Courage's score to the Star Trek pilot, "The Cage," is recorded (1965)
January 22 - Richard Markowitz begins recording his score for The Wild Wild West pilot episode “The Night of the Inferno” (1965)
January 22 - Fred Steiner records his score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Undead” (1968)
January 22 - Leith Stevens records his score for the Land of the Giants episode “Night of Thrombeldinbar” (1969)
January 22 - Bruce Broughton records his score for the Buck Rogers in the 25th Century episode “The Guardians” (1981)
January 22 - Justin Hurwitz born (1985)
January 22 - Christopher Palmer died (1995)
January 22 - Billy May died (2004)
January 23 - Walter Greene born (1910)
January 23 - Marty Paich born (1925)
January 23 - George Aliceson Tipton born (1932)
January 23 - Dick DeBenedictis born (1937)
January 23 - Casablanca released in theaters (1943)
January 23 - Alfred Newman begins recording his score to The President's Lady (1953)
January 23 - Recording sessions begin on Alex North’s score for The Bad Seed (1956)
January 23 - David Arnold born (1962)
January 23 - Recording sessions begin for Danny Elfman’s score for Dolores Claiborne (1995)
January 23 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “For the Uniform” (1997)
January 23 - Riz Ortolani died (2014)
January 24 - Muir Mathieson born (1911)
January 24 - Norman Dello Joio born (1913)
January 24 - Joseph Carl Breil died (1926)
January 24 - Nico Fidenco born (1933)
January 24 - Neil Diamond born (1941)
January 24 - The Treasure of the Sierra Madre opens in theaters (1948)
January 24 - Bernard Herrmann records his score for The Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode “The Jar” (1964)
January 24 - Leonard Rosenman begins recording his score for The Phantom of Hollywood (1974)
January 24 - Dennis McCarthy records his score for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Conundrum” (1992)
January 24 - Ken Darby died (1992)
January 24 - Larry Crosley died (1998)
January 25 - Albert Glasser born (1916)
January 25 - Antonio Carlos Jobim born (1927)
January 25 - Benny Golson born (1929)
January 25 - Tobe Hooper born (1943)
January 25 - Hans-Erik Philip born (1943)
January 25 - Venedikt Pushkov died (1971)
January 25 - Jerry Goldsmith begins recording his score for Poltergeist (1982) 
January 25 - Paul J. Smith died (1985)
January 25 - James Horner begins recording his score for A Far Off Place (1993)
January 25 - Gregory Smith records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Field of Fire” (1999)
January 25 - Simeon Pironkov died (2000)
January 25 - Normand Corbeil died (2013)
January 25 - John Morris died (2018)

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

AMERICAN FICTION - Laura Karpman
 
"It makes sense to call 'American Fiction' jazzy, because its rhythms are clearly inspired by the name of its central character, Thelonious Ellison. He’s a writer and English professor whom everybody calls Monk because of his first name -- and while there are no actual Thelonious Monk needle-drops on the soundtrack, Laura Karpman’s indelible score and a variety of tracks from people like Cannonball Adderly set a tone that Jefferson picks up and runs with."
 
Steve Pond, The Wrap 

"Jefferson puts his heart into the moments that even his movie’s own marketing leaves out. Satire is just a wraparound gimmick for a marvelously acted, naturalistic drama about a prickly, privileged Black man and his family, set to Laura Karpman’s tender piano-forward score. The film is radical only in the fact that we haven’t seen many like it, a point Jefferson hammers home in a montage of real movies -- 'New Jack City,' 'Precious,' 'Antebellum' -- cut to promote a cable channel’s Black Stories Month, a hit parade of gunfire, teen pregnancy and enslavement."
 
Amy Nicholson, The New York Times 
 
"After he accepts the deal, his double life begins, with the film essentially alternating stretches of Monk’s professional and personal existences. But the tonal balance of satirical and emotional is disrupted the deeper Monk gets into the grift and starts dating his neighbor, Coraline (Erika Alexander). The movie begins shifting more awkwardly between the misanthropic writer posing as a fugitive convict (the excuse Monk claims to avoid press appearances) and Monk trying to manage his mother’s health, a new relationship and his brother Cliff’s own personal reckonings. Some of the dramatic moments -- bathed in sweeping orchestral music -- don’t land as forcefully as they should, hampered by the film’s increasingly uneven rhythm and pacing."
 
Lovia Gyarkye, The Hollywood Reporter 
 
CHICKEN RUN: DAWN OF THE NUGGET -  Harry Gregson-Williams

"Yet of course, Molly wants to know what’s on the other side of the water, setting off a caper with strong overtones (including the musical sort) of 'Mission: Impossible,' sprinkled with some references to Bond villains, 'The Truman Show,' 'The Stepford Wives' and probably some other movies I missed. 'Chicken Run: Dawn of the Nugget,' directed by the Aardman stalwart Sam Fell, is in many respects a cover song, a repeat of the beats and characters of 'Chicken Run.' But when the source material was so fun, the cover is bound to be enjoyable, and this one is, even if it sags a little around the two-thirds mark. There’s punning, and contraptions, and ducks that shoot lasers out of their eyes. It’s a good time."
 
Alissa Wilkinson, The New York Times 
 
"From a distance, the facility looks more like a Bond villain’s heavily fortified base than any food-processing plant you’ve ever seen. To the chickens imprisoned inside, however, Fun Land Farms has been designed to meet their idea of paradise, albeit a creepy 'Squid Game'-esque one where brightly colored sets and sky-blue walls give a semblance of comfort before the feathered guests are sent to the meat grinder. Seems like a fairly humane alternative to most chicken farms, even if it’s a far cry from the cage-freedom their brethren enjoy early on — as seen in a cute montage set to a catchy song, Paloma Faith’s 'My Sweet Baby' (a nice break from Harry Gregson-Williams’ overly busy, occasionally Lalo Schifrin-inspired score)."
 
Peter Debruge, Variety 

FREUD'S LAST SESSION - Coby Brown
 
"Another plus is that this film is exceptionally well made. The cinematography by Ben Smithard (who photographed Hopkins’ recent movies with director Florian Zeller, 'The Father' and 'The Son') and the production design by Luciana Arrighi (who worked on two earlier Hopkins movies, 'Howards End' and 'The Remains of the Day') help to bring the past alive. Coby Brown’s score is subtle and haunting. And for those in search of an intriguing companion piece, check out 'Shadowlands' (a superior movie) to see Hopkins as C.S. Lewis at another period in the famous author’s life."
 
Stephen Farber, The Hollywood Reporter 

THE IRON CLAW - Richard Reed Parry
 
"Decades of familial turmoil passing across a couple hours of screentime feels like a magic trick made from impressive editing and a combination of score and soundtrack that draws you into the setting without inducing eyerolls. One of the most enjoyable and intense scenes before tragedy starts unfurling is a montage of Kevin, David and Kerry walking out in their shiny, colorful, Texas-themed outfits to wrestle while Rush’s 'Tom Sawyer' plays. Matthew Hannam’s cutting allows for a lot of fluidity, but can compress the chronology enough to perhaps invite confusion, although it is not quite debilitatingly disruptive."
 
Kevin Fox Jr., Paste Magazine 
 
LEO - Score: Geoff Zanelli; Songs: Robert Smigel & others

"This also applies to musical numbers as 'Leo' isn’t afraid of going weird with its songs. It’s more concerned with being funny than delivering an overwhelming soundtrack. In 'Dear Drone,' for example, we're taken through the process of breaking up with an overprotective machine, and the song just ends abruptly, while 'Don't Cry' is presented as a lullaby but it's basically Leo being a jerk to a little girl. From references to Lin-Manuel Miranda ('Moana') to songs that don’t rhyme and even metalinguistic performances -- the one with the clocks is especially good because it completely underscores a particular character’s personality --' Leo' shows a surprising level of maturity that we’ve only come to expect from Pixar and Studio Ghibli films."
 
Erick Massoto, Collider 

"This babysitter of a movie is, at times, inexplicably, a musical. Not in a grandiose uniform sense. But in some of its sequences about Leo’s impact on the young ones, there is some singing before directors Robert Smigel (who wrote the songs), Robert Marianetti, and David Wachtenheim shuffle on. Emphasis on some, as the musical numbers are cheap, whether it’s their short length, their spare piano and light strings arrangement, or the lack of choreography. 'Leo' hopes to compete with other animated movies that are soundtracks first and stories second, but the cut corners are too obvious."
 
Nick Allen, RogerEbert.com 
 
"'Leo's animation is fine; no fancy tricks on the CGI front. Its songs are not schmaltzy, and as such are unlikely to become annoying anthems such as 'Let It Go.' In that sense, 'Leo' is totally unlike a movie like 'Luca,' for example. The wistful, musical 'Luca,' a charming story about abiding friendship, makes that Pixar movie repeat watch fare in my household. However, if you’re looking for a general mood lifter, and something easy to watch, 'Leo' is a great option. Besides, now I am kind of interested in what the Sandler family comes up with next. An intergenerational sports film? Some kind of family murder mystery? Bring it on.
 
Aparita Bhandari, Paste Magazine 

"A lot of the film is just Sandler listening to kids and putting the wisdom he’s acquired to good use, which can be a problem if the advice isn’t sound. There’s one scene where Leo sings a song to a troubled child about why 'crying’s for weaklings' and 'lazy and dumb,' where it looks the movie has gone weirdly and completely off the rails. But then, in a welcome surprise, the scene pulls a u-turn and reveals he’s actually putting his faith in the child to know that he’s wrong and she’s right and that it’s okay to let her emotions out. It’s a gamble, and it actually pays off.
'Leo' is a musical, and not a particularly good one, with well-meaning but forgettable songs. Even the film doesn’t have much faith in them. At one point, an overbearing father, voiced by Jason Alexander, sings a song about getting his daughter special privileges at school. His daughter leaves halfway through and we miss the rest of it because it’s not important and nobody cares. This does, however, lead to the film’s weirdest joke, where a group of anthropomorphic stopwatches materialize out of nowhere to be his backup dancers, but walk away downtrodden afterwards because the cheap jerk refuses to tip them."
 
William Bibbiani, The Wrap

"Like all of the little ditties that pepper this movie, her almost Gilbert-and-Sullivan-speed number is cute and short and refreshingly devoid of any sort of 'Let it Go'-sized aspirations. It’s hard to imagine that kids will be inspired to commit any of these tunes to memory (or beg to rewatch something that never proves to be even half as sticky as its lead character’s tongue), but as the father of a 'Frozen'-pilled four-year-old I’m tempted to count that as a positive."
 
David Ehrlich, IndieWire
 
"He has good tips for the other kids too, like immunodeficient Eli (Roey Smigel), whose parents send him to school with a hovering robot nanny, to whom he writes a 'Dear drone' letter (one of Smigel’s funnier songs). There’s also secretly brilliant Mia (Reese Lores), who’s struggling with her parents’ divorce; obligatory bully Anthony (Ethan Smigel); voice-cracking Cole (Bryant Tardy when the character talks, and Corey J when it comes time to sing); and a popular girl named Jayda (Sadie Sandler), whom Leo convinces is 'not that great' … but in a good way (via the very funny 'Extra Time' song)."
 
Peter Debruge, Variety 

"The animation work in 'Leo' is solid (it’s similar to Apple TV+’s 'Luck') and the music (by Smigel, while Geoff Zanelli composed the score) is more winking theatricality than memorable rhymes. It’s the narrative and Sandler’s comedic timing that will keep you watching. The actor is joined by his daughters here, who contribute fine voice work (Leo, like Netflix’s 'You Are So Not Invited to My Bat Mitzvah,' feels like a family affair): Sadie and Sunny Sandler play Jayda and Summer, respectively, two girls on opposite sides of the popularity spectrum, who share more than they realize."
 
Lovia Gyarkye, The Hollywood Reporter 

POOR THINGS - Jerskin Fendrix

"And Jerskin Fendrix’s unruly, dissonant score, working in context with Johnnie Burn’s womblike soundscape, plays like something piped in directly from Bella’s transplanted psyche. In a way, Fendrix’s compositions -- moving from the wry, picaresque strings of Bella’s early years to a convulsive coming-of-age synth-ony -- tell the story as directly as any of McNamara’s words."
 
Justin Chang, Los Angeles Times 

"What 'Poor Things' aims to be is a fantasia of sherbet colors and steampunk steel, a Frankenstein-inflected philosophical questioning and a wild girl’s coming of age, a pitch-black farce and a sexual investigation that hinges upon the belief that, yes, women captain their destinies. And I can sense that everyone involved in the film -- from screenwriter Tony McNamara, who adapted the novel by Alasdair Grey, to director Yorgos Lanthimos and leading lady Emma Stone, to even composer Jerskin Fendrix -- is committed to these ragged, wide-ranging impulses. But those impulses are rancid. For a film whose camera is so obsessed with its lead actress’s body, it is remarkably sterile on the subject. 'Poor Things' is ultimately ugly -- spiritually and narratively, which curdles even its aesthetic splendor. Though there are faults to be found on this ground too; namely, the discordant, jaunty score grates."
 
Anjelica Jade Bastien, New York 
 
"'Poor Things' is an episodic saga of feminist empowerment that moves from one hilariously bizarre scenario to another, each one rife with fanciful physical, conversational and narrative idiosyncrasies. Everything in Lanthimos’ make-believe cine-playground is stretched and bow-tied in weird and wonderful ways, and Jerskin Fendrix’s score is similarly elastic, operating in so many diverse registers -- sharp and suspenseful strings, low and terrifying tones, playful and flighty flutes -- that the film feels like it’s in a constant state of metamorphosis."
 
Nick Schager, The Daily Beast
 
"In that regard, Lanthimos holds nothing back in making his version of Victorian Europe into a surreal landscape, mirroring Bella’s birth into a new reality by beckoning us into a world where steampunk silliness and blatant artificiality are an unremarkable norm. What starts with the nonsensical animal hybrid experiments housed in Godwin’s home eventually balloons outward into a world populated with mechanized limbs, skies painted with oversaturated pastels, and theatrically enclosed sets meant to stand in for whole cities. Production designers Shona Heath and James Price achieve gorgeous effects that are no less potent through Robbie Ryan’s characteristically distorted cinematography, and the unease is enhanced by Jerskin Fendrix’s fittingly discordant (if occasionally and purposely intrusive) score."
 
Leigh Monson, The Onion AV Club
 
"From the very first frame of Yorgos Lanthimos’ tremendous 'Poor Things,' everything feels off. The sky is a cloudy blue that seems unnatural, Jerskin Fendrix’s haunting score creeps its way down your spine, and we watch as a woman jumps to her death, almost a speck in a massive body of water. But for those familiar with the work of Lanthimos, from his comically disturbing 'Dogtooth' to the more straightforward 18th-century horrors of his last film, 'The Favourite,' this almost feels like the culmination of everything he has ever made. In his past films, we’ve watched the unnatural, wild worlds hidden within our own, but with 'Poor Things,' the world is whatever Lanthimos wants it to be."
 
Ross Bonaime, Collider 
 
"A more significant change is that the tone is far more fantastical than it is in the novel. Gray balanced the strangeness of his gothic yarn with deeply researched descriptions of the injustices of 19th-Century society, and that's what gave the book much of its ironic humour and satirical power. Lanthimos, on the other hand, has transplanted 'Poor Things' to a steam-punk wonderland of garish colours, masked-ball costumes, squawking music, and obviously artificial, picture-book backgrounds: imagine a Terry Gilliam film multiplied by a Wes Anderson film and you'll have some idea of the lavish freakishness in store. In the process, the narrative loses some of its emotion and a lot of its politics. Traces of Gray's views on feminism and socialism are still visible, but it can be hard to spot them amid the endless sex scenes and the retina-scorching production design."
 
Nicholas Barber, BBC.com 

"Against this spirit of sensual and sensory richness, experimental pop artist Jerskin Fendrix’s gnawing, atonal score -- mirroring Bella’s switching fixations by doggedly stressing one instrument at a time -- stands out for its severity. Consider it an aural reminder that Lanthimos, even when granted both the finances and freedom to realize such an extravagant adult fantasy, remains something of a brutalist, a surgeon who will rudely cut to the heart of the human condition, spilling insides that not everyone will want to see. Oddly moving in its fervor and abundance, 'Poor Things' may appear a far cry from the harsh, stripped ascetism of an early work like 'Dogtooth.' But they’re actually similar animals, fixated on taking people apart to find what makes them tick, what makes them swoon, what makes them interesting."
 
Guy Lodge, Variety 
 
"Then there’s the remarkable score by English musician Jerskin Fendrix, a kind of punk-classical panoply of sounds, often dissonant, jarring, agitated or lugubrious, elsewhere mischievous and capering. Nothing in 'Poor Things' could be described as ordinary."
 
David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter  

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films in Los Angeles-area theaters. 

January 19
AIRPLANE! (Elmer Bernstein), TOP SECRET! (Maurice Jarre) [New Beverly]
AUDITION (Koji Endo) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE BROOD (Howard Shore) [Vidiots]
THE CITY OF LOST CHILDREN (Angelo Badalamenti) [Nuart]
A CONFUCIAN CONFUSION (Antonio Lee) [Aero]
THE EXORCIST [New Beverly]
HOUSE PARTY (Marcus Miller, Lenny White) [Academy Museum]
INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS [New Beverly]
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING (Howard Shore) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
QUEEN CHRISTINA (Herbert Stothart), MATA HARI [UCLA/Hammer]
STUNT ROCK (Sorcery) [Alamo Drafthouse]
WEREWOLVES WITHIN (Anna Drubich) [Vidiots]

January 20
THE AMERICAN FRIEND (Jurgen Knieper) [Los Feliz 3]

AUDITION (Koji Endo) [Alamo Drafthouse]
A BRIGHTER SUMMER DAY (Hongda Zhang) [Egyptian]
BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB [Los Feliz 3]
CHAN IS MISSING (Robert Kikuchi-Yngojo) [Academy Museum]
DEEP IMPACT (James Horner) [Academy Museum]
DRUNKEN MASTER (Fu Liang-Chou) [Los Feliz 3]
THE LIMEY (Cliff Martinez) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE LITTLE MERMAID (Alan Menken) [Academy Museum]
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING (Howard Shore) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
LOST IN TRANSLATION (Kevin Shields) [BrainDead Studios]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart] 
THE SEVENTH SEAL (Erik Nordgren) [Vidiots]
SHAUN OF THE DEAD (Daniel Mudford, Pete Woodhead) [Landmark Westwood]
TORSO (Guido & Maurizio DeAngelius), THE STRANGE VICE OF MRS. WARDH (Nora Orlandi) [Egyptian]
TWILIGHT (Carter Burwell), THE TWILIGHT SAGA: NEW MOON (Alexandre Desplat), THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (Howard Shore), THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN PART 1 (Carter Burwell), THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN PART 2 (Carter Burwell) [New Beverly]
UNDER THE SKIN (Mica Levi) [Vidiots]

WALL-E (Thomas Newman) [Vidiots]

January 21
ALICE IN THE CITIES (Can), WRONG MOVE (Jurgen Knieper), KINGS OF THE ROAD (Axel Lindstadt) [Egyptian]
BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB [Academy Museum]
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND (John Williams) [Vidiots]
FUNNY GIRL (Jule Styne, Walter Scharf) [New Beverly]
GODZILLA VS. THE THING (Akira Ifukube) [BrainDead Studios]
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING (Howard Shore) [Alamo Drafthouse]
NINOTCHKA (Werner R. Heymann), TWO-FACED WOMAN (Bronislau Kaper) [UCLA/Hammer]
THE SOUND OF MUSIC (Richard Rodgers, Irwin Kostal) [Vidiots]
TRUE STORIES (David Byrne) [Vidiots]
WEIRD SCIENCE (Ira Newborn) [Alamo Drafthouse]
WHEN TIME RAN OUT (Lalo Schifrin) [Academy Museum]
THE WIZARD OF OZ (Harold Arlen, Herbert Stothart) [New Beverly]
YI YI (Kai-li Peng) [Aero] 

January 22
AMUCK! (Teo Usuelli) [Los Feliz 3]
AUDITION (Koji Endo) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISE [Vidiots]
EYE OF THE CAT (Lalo Schifrin), GAMES (Samuel Matlovsky) [New Beverly]
THE GOONIES (Dave Grusin) [Alamo Drafthouse]
STRANGER THAN PARADISE (John Lurie) [New Beverly]

January 23
BADLANDS (George Aliceson Tipton) [Landmark Pasadena]
GALAXY QUEST (David Newman) [Alamo Drafthouse]
KAILI BLUES (Giong Lim) [Los Feliz 3]
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING (Howard Shore) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
TO LIVE AND DIE IN L.A. (Wang Chung), DRIVE (Clint Mansell) [New Beverly]

January 24
THE GOALIE'S ANXIETY AT THE PENALTY KICK (Jurgen Knieper) [Los Feliz 3]
THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER [BrainDead Studios]
THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING (Howard Shore) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
ROMEO AND JULIET (Nino Rota) [Academy Museum]
STUNT ROCK (Sorcery) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE TERRORIZERS (Xiaoliang Weng) [Los Feliz 3]
TO LIVE AND DIE IN L.A. (Wang Chung), DRIVE (Clint Mansell) [New Beverly]

January 25
TAIPEI STORY (Edward Yang), IN OUR TIME [Aero]
TO LIVE AND DIE IN L.A. (Wang Chung), DRIVE (Clint Mansell) [New Beverly] 

January 26
CHRISTINE (John Carpenter, Alan Howarth) [Alamo Drafthouse]
DOGFIGHT (Mason Daring) [Los Feliz 3]
A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS (Ennio Morricone) [Nuart]
FRANCES HA [Vidiots]
GHOST WORLD (David Kitay) [New Beverly]
HOUSEHOLD SAINTS (Stephen Endelman) [Los Feliz 3]
IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE (Michael Galasso, Shigeru Umebayashi) [New Beverly]
INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS [New Beverly]
THE MATRIX (Don Davis) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SAN ANDREAS (Andrew Lockington) [Academy Museum]
A SCANNER DARKLY (Graham Reynolds) [Vidiots]
SORCERER (Tangerine Dream) [Alamo Drafthouse]

January 27
ASHFALL (Jun-seok Bang) [Academy Museum]
E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL (John Williams) [New Beverly]
HOOP DREAMS (Ben Sidran) [Academy Museum]
IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE (Michael Galasso, Shigeru Umebayashi) [New Beverly]
LE GRAND AMOUR (Claude Stieremans) [Los Feliz 3]
THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE (Lorne Balfe) [Academy Museum]
THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (Fred Katz) [Los Feliz 3]
MAHJONG [Egyptian]
THE MATRIX (Don Davis) [Alamo Drafthouse]
PEEPING TOM (Brian Easdale) [Egyptian]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart] 
SORCERER (Tangerine Dream) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
STOP MAKING SENSE [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY (Gabriel Yared) [Alamo Drafthouse]
TRAINSPOTTING [New Beverly]
TRUE LOVE [Los Feliz 3]

January 28
ALL ABOUT LILY CHOU-CHOU (Takeshi Kobayashi) [BrainDead Studios]
THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (Hugo Friedhofer) [UCLA/Hammer]
BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN (Gustavo Santaolalla) [Academy Museum]
CLUELESS (David Kitay) [Alamo Drafthouse]
DRUGSTORE COWBOY (Elliot Goldenthal) [Vidiots]
E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL (John Williams) [New Beverly] 
HOUSEHOLD SAINTS (Stephen Endelman) [Los Feliz 3]
IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE (Michael Galasso, Shigeru Umebayashi) [New Beverly] 
PADDINGTON 2 (Dario Marianelli) [UCLA/Hammer]
THE SWARM (Jerry Goldsmith) [Academy Museum]
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES (John DuPrez) [Vidiots]
TO DIE FOR (Danny Elfman) [Vidiots]
YI YI (Kai-Li Peng) [Egyptian]


THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Heard:
The Quintessential Billie Holiday Vol. 5 (Holiday); Ride Along 2 (Lennertz); Pennies from Heaven (various); Author! Author! (Mandel); Twelve Nights in Hollywood (Fitzgerald); Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III (Leonard-Morgan); The Quintessential Billie Holiday Vol. 7 (Holiday); Gold (Day); Gigi (Loewe); We'll Meet Again: The Love Songs of World War II (various); Something Wicked This Way Comes (Delerue)

Read: Count Zero, by William Gibson

Seen: The Host [2006]; Earthquake; The Black Stallion; Deluge; A Woman Under the Influence; Oppenheimer

Watched: Hanging By a Thread Part 1; Justified ("Foot Chase"); Key & Peele ("Gang Stand-Off")

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