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The latest release from La-La Land is the fourth in their 1701 COLLECTION series of episode scores from the original STAR TREK (previously included in the label's massive boxed-set). This release features scores from the series' third and final season, by composers Alexander Courage ("The Enterprise Incident," "Plato's Stepchildren"), Jerry Fielding ("Spectre of the Gun") and Gerald Fried ("The Paradise Syndrome"), plus source music and other cues from the episodes "Requiem for Methuselah," "The Way to Eden" and "Whom Gods Destroy."


The latest release from Caldera is the first release of the original score tracks for Roy Budd's score from the 1970 Western SOLIDER BLUE, starring Peter Strauss and Candice Bergen. 


CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Alexei Aigui - Film Music Collection
 - Alexei Aigui - Music Box 
Les B.O. Introuvables Vol. 7
 - Sam Bernett, Jean Bouchety, Jean Musy, Dominique Perrier, Karl-Heinz Shafter - Music Box 
Relative Dimensions: 60 Years in Time and Space
 - Joe Kraemer - Buysoundtrax 
Soldier Blue
- Roy Budd - Caldera 


IN THEATERS TODAY

Here for Blood - Norman Orenstein
How to Have Sex - James Jacob
Last Party - Titouan Cauchi-Caron 
Lisa Frankenstein - Isabella Summers
Lola - Mervyn Warren
Molli and Max in the Future - Alex Winkler
The Monk and the Gun - Frederic Alvarez
The Movie Emperor - Raymond Wong, Russell CJ Wong 
Out of Darkness - Adam Janota Bzowski
Perfect Days - Music Supervisor: Milena Fessmann
Popular Theory - Jordan Seigel 


COMING SOON

February 16
L'alba dell'uomo
 - Piero Piccioni - Beat 
Star Trek: The Original Series - The 1701 Collection vol. 4
- Alexander Courage, Jerry Fielding, Gerald Fried - La-La Land
Coming Soon
Cliffhangers
 - Joe Harnell - Five Jays [CD-R]
The Joe Kraemer Collection Vol. 1
 - Joe Kraemer - Dragon's Domain [CD-R]
Octopussy
 - John Barry - La-La Land
Scusi, ma lei le paga le tasse?/Come rubammo la bomba atomica
 - Lallo Gori - Beat   


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

February 9 - Jean Constantin born (1923)
February 9 - Barry Mann born (1939)
February 9 - Alfred Newman begins recording his score for The Counterfeit Traitor (1962)
February 9 - Gregory Tripi born (1975)
February 9 - Elvis Perkins born (1976)
February 9 - Percy Faith died (1976)
February 9 - James Horner begins recording his score for Project X (1987)
February 9 - Jean-Claude Petit begins recording his score for The Return of the Musketeers (1989)
February 9 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “One Little Ship” (1998)
February 9 - Dennis McCarthy and Kevin Kiner record their score for the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Doctor’s Orders” (2004)
February 9 - Johann Johannsson died (2018)
February 9 - Hildur Gudnadottir wins her first Oscar, for Joker (2020)
February 10 - Larry Adler born (1914)
February 10 - Gordon Zahler born (1926)
February 10 - Jerry Goldsmith born (1929)
February 10 - Billy Goldenberg born (1936)
February 10 - Nathan Van Cleave records his score for The Space Children (1958)
February 10 - Bruce Broughton records his score for the Buck Rogers in the 25th Century episode “The Golden Man” (1981)
February 10 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “By Inferno’s Light” (1997)
February 10 - Velton Ray Bunch records his score for the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Affliction” (2005)
February 10 - Lyle Mays died (2020)
February 11 - Yves Baudrier born (1906)
February 11 - Recording sessions begin for Leigh Harline's score for The Desert Rats (1953)
February 11 - Bernard Herrmann records his score for the Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode “Wally the Beard” (1964)
February 11 - Dave Grusin’s score for The Wild Wild West episode “The Night of the Puppeteer” is recorded (1966)
February 11 - Richard Markowitz records his score for the Mission: Impossible episode “The Bunker” (1969)
February 11 - Mike Shinoda born (1977)
February 11 - Heinz Roemheld died (1985)
February 11 - Don Davis begins recording his score for The Matrix Reloaded (2003)
February 12 - Howard Blake born (1938)
February 12 - Leo F. Forbstein died (1948)
February 12 - Bill Laswell born (1955)
February 12 - George Antheil died (1959)
February 12 - Harry Geller records his score for the Land of the Giants episode “Target: Earth” (1969)
February 12 - Benjamin Frankel died (1973)
February 12 - Lalo Schifrin begins recording his score for Sky Riders (1976)
February 12 - Bruce Broughton begins recording his score for The Rescue (1988)
February 12 - John Williams begins recording his score for A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
February 12 - Dennis McCarthy begins recording his scores for the Star Trek: Voyager episodes “Workforce, Parts I & II” (2001)
February 12 - Marco Beltrami begins recording his score for Hellboy (2004)
February 12 - George Aliceson Tipton died (2016)
February 13 - Lennie Hayton born (1908)
February 13 - Erik Nordgren born (1913)
February 13 - Fred Karger born (1916)
February 13 - Nino Oliviero born (1918)
February 13 - Gerald Fried born (1928)
February 13 - Peter Gabriel born (1950)
February 13 - W.G. Snuffy Walden born (1950)
February 13 - William Axt died (1959)
February 13 - Joseph Mullendore records his score for the Lost in Space episode "Junkyard in Space" (1968)
February 13 - Fred Myrow begins recording score to Soylent Green (1973)
February 13 - Jerry Fielding begins recording his score for Funeral Home (1980)
February 13 - David Newman begins recording his score for The Sandlot (1993)
February 13 - Paul Baillargeon records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Lifesigns” (1996)
February 13 - Gregory Smith records his score for the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode “Honor Among Thieves” (1998)
February 13 - Brian Tyler records his score for the Enterprise episode “Canamar” (2003)
February 14 - Werner Heymann born (1886)
February 14 - Elliot Lawrence born (1925)
February 14 - Merl Saunders born (1934)
February 14 - Andre Previn begins recording his score for Challenge to Lassie (1949)
February 14 - Jocelyn Pook born (1960)
February 14 - Warren Ellis born (1965)
February 14 - David Holmes born (1969)
February 14 - Ken Thorne begins recording his score for Superman III (1983)
February 14 - Frederick Loewe died (1988)
February 14 - Jay Chattaway records his score for the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Spirit Folk” (2000)
February 14 - Piero Umiliani died (2001)
February 15 - Georges Auric born (1899)
February 15 - Harold Arlen born (1905)
February 15 - Wladimir Selinsky born (1910)
February 15 - Miklos Rozsa records his replacement score for Crest of the Wave (1954)
February 15 - Stephen Edwards born (1972)
February 15 - Johnny Harris records his score for the Buck Rogers in the 25th Century episode “Space Rockers” (1980)
February 15 - Lucio Agostini died (1996)
February 15 - Pierre Bachelet died (2005) 

DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

AMERICAN SYMPHONY - Jon Batiste
 
"But his goal isn’t just to remain sane, it’s to create a piece of work that takes different strains of American music and puts them on the same stage in what is traditionally a classical setting. He starts by writing 40 minutes of music on his own, then brings in other musicians to improvise and make their own contributions to what becomes an expansive, complicated and contradictory piece of music. The film’s homestretch takes us to Carnegie Hall, with Jaouad in attendance in what she says is her first time out of the house or hospital in more than a year. The musicians weather a brief onstage power outage, with Batiste delivering an unamplified piano solo that becomes a summation of his and his wife’s entire journey. And then the power comes back on, the classical virtuosos and jazz cats and Native American drummers and soulful vocalists step up and the ensemble comes together on a work that, in the truncated form that we see on screen, seems to be both a truly American symphony and a portrait of one particular American life."
 
Steve Pond, The Wrap

"What we do get of his music is only, fittingly, a motif: A melody, a simple theme that even the tinniest ear can hold onto and a musical line that can be turned into a narrative, evolving from a hum and rhythm pounded out on a sofa, to a piano line, to a fully orchestrated piece. We never learn the titles of 'American Symphony''s movements ('Capitalism,' 'Integrity,' 'Globalism' and 'Majesty') or see alluded-to conversations between Batiste and the Indigenous performers who join his ensemble. We get a catchy little riff, inherently reductive of the daunting achievement that dominates the runtime. The quality and duration of access, ranging from hospital beds to the very stage of Carnegie Hall, implies an insight into his creative process and intentions that we never receive. Batiste is a fascinating subject, coming from such a legendary New Orleans jazz family that HBO’s 'Treme' named Wendell Pierce’s trombone-toting protagonist Antoine Batiste. From Oscar-nominated scores ('Soul') to a rousing late-night gig ('The Late Show with Stephen Colbert') to Grammy after Grammy after Grammy, he’s already at the highest levels of musical achievement -- and he’s not even 40. His expansive ambitions for 'American Symphony' owe plenty to fellow New Orleanian Wynton Marsalis, who wrote a history-reckoning jazz composition that became the first to ever win a Pulitzer. Despite ostensibly riding alongside Batiste throughout his journey, we never really know what he’s thinking about his music beyond the sound bites."
 
Jacob Oller, Paste Magazine 
 
CANDY CANE LANE - Marcus Miller
 
"But it also has a deadening clockwork quality. There’s the usual heavy-footed deployment of the 'comedy! comedy!' score to cue us to laugh or have feelings. The only thing more numerous than the Christmas references (the family members’ names are Carol, Holly, Joy and Nick) are clichés, down to a Tarantino slo-mo walk for no reason. There’s a musical interlude shoehorned in and gag payoffs that viewers will see coming from miles off."
 
Michael Ordona, Los Angeles Times 
 
THE DISAPPEARANCE OF SHERE HITE - Lisbeth Scott
 
"It’s an example of editor Eileen Meyer’s imaginative cutting style that extends to the sound design: Dreamily overlapping fragments of Hite’s writing, melodically narrated by Dakota Johnson, interlock with Lisbeth Scott’s score and the piano concertos and disco cuts on the soundtrack. Where other archive-reliant bio-docs can feel purely functional in form, 'Crip Camp' director Newnham crafts “Disappearance” like carefully stitched embroidery."
 
Jessica Kiang, Variety
 
FERRARI - Daniel Pemberton
 
"From the gorgeous cinematography by Erik Messerschmidt, the mesmerizing Daniel Pemberton score, a towering performance by Cruz, and Martin’s screenplay that reflects as much on Enzo’s insular battles as well as his public ones in equal measure, 'Ferrari' is one of Mann’s best film [sic] in years. 'Ferrari' isn’t just an impactful look at grief, it’s also Mann having a hell of a lot of fun. 'Ferrari' constantly shows us the highs and lows of every day, and how we must take the good with the band, and Mann does that by making this both heartbreaking and delightful in equal measure. In the end, Mann gives us a film that feels like a terrible joy."
 
Ross Bonaime, Collider 

"Of course, as with all Mann films, the craft here is simply impeccable. Cinematographer Erik Messerschmidt had a stunning year with his sharp work in 'The Killer' and the subtle tension he brings here avoids being flashy in ways that keep the film both grounded and always moving. The editing by master Pietro Scalia ('JFK,' 'Black Hawk Down') really holds a lot of this film together as it slides effortlessly from scenes of domestic conflict to anticipation for the pending race known as the Mille Miglia. Daniel Pemberton did two great scores this year -- this one and 'Spider-Man: Across the Spider-Verse.' Just as everyone wanted to work with the actual Ferrari, Michael Mann attracts top talent across the board, and they jointly elevate 'Ferrari' in ways that lead to one of the most well-made films of the year."
 
Brian Tallerico, RogerEbert.com 

"Like Ferrari himself, the technical craftsmanship earns high marks. Erik Messerschmidt takes a painterly approach to capturing the three drastically different worlds Enzo inhabits. He tailors each for a nuanced mood -- whether we’re in the soothing sanctuary of the Lardi home, between the walls of the dank and oppressive Ferrari chambers, or feeling the freedom of the airy race track. This all works in chorus with Maria Djurkovic’s perfect production design, with its distinct color palettes enhancing character texture, and Daniel Pemberton’s score, which is both symphonic and percussive, occasionally aided by compositions by Lisa Gerrard and Pieter Bourke."
 
Courtney Howard, The Onion AV Club 
 
"The setup is a classically Mann work-and-family construct, and much of it is distilled into that earlier scene with Enzo, Piero and the blueprints. Here, far removed from the clamor and frenzy of the racetrack, a man shows his son the ropes while the boy’s mother looks lovingly on from the sidelines. In these moments, it’s hard not to flash back on other Mann thrillers (especially 'Thief' and 'Heat'), with their close-up scrutiny of men at work and their pointed juxtaposition of personal and professional spaces. It’s also hard not to contrast this sweet domestic idyll, bathed in sunlight and backed by Daniel Pemberton’s moving score, with the impenetrable walls of darkness at Enzo and Laura’s house in Modena, where their once-happy marriage hangs by a slender if surprisingly resilient thread."
 
Justin Chang, Variety 

I.S.S. - Anne Nikitin
 
"The film’s aesthetics fare better than the drama on display. Camerawork simulating zero gravity looks and feels immersive. Anne Nikitin’s score does a lot of the heavy lifting delivering moody atmosphere to the picture. Her compositions, utilizing prickly symphonic strings and dark, foreboding instruments, perfectly underscore threats, sorrow, and menace. Cinematographer Nick Remy Matthews pulls hints of inspiration from 'Alien''s lighting cues. Visual effects are gorgeously styled and clean-lined, providing a backdrop filled with brutality and beauty."
 
Courtney Howard, The Onion AV Club 

"But the movie has all the energy of a dry classroom lecture. The performances are dialed back almost to monotone level, the score does nothing to goose up the tension, and even the inevitable chase sequence seems slow and distracted. No one here is selling the idea that life or death is on the line. Even 'Stowaway,' the 2021 Anna Kendrick-led sci-fi thriller that similarly delivers its questions about how to choose sacrificial victims in a hushed, respectful whisper, had more energy than this."
 
Tasha Robinson, Polygon

"What follows is consistently watchable and sometimes tense but, despite some twists, largely unsurprising. After the introductions -- Chris Messina plays the third American, Gordon -- and the assorted personalities and relationships have been sketched in, the movie gets down to genre business with some worrisome red-orange flashes on Earth. Communication failures ensue, as do the progressively more fretful faces and soundtrack music. The two crews close ranks, with the Americans retreating to one corner to sneak worried looks at the similarly alarmed Russians, who include Weronika (Masha Mashkova) and Nicholai (Costa Ronin)."
 
Manohla Dargis, The New York Times 
 
THE SETTLERS - Harry Allouche

"Simone D'Arcangelo's cinematography is crucial in establishing this cruel environment. He films the stunning landscape with a sense of awe but also portent. The sunset light seems to burn into the horses' sides, their short hairs glinting with gold. Things are too lit up by that close sun to even look at directly. This is not 'pretty' beauty. It's awful, because a genocide is going on in all that beauty. Harry Allouche's score is massive and ominous, adding weight and urgency to the images. It's a big score, the kind you don't really hear anymore, and it's a huge contribution."
 
Sheila O'Malley, RogerEbert.com 
 
"Windblown landscapes, gorgeous in their untouched harshness, serve as the stage for the British army man leading the vile expedition, Alexander MacLenan (Mark Stanley), to assert his dubious dominance. Stanley expresses MacLenan’s burning desire to earn respect as postured bravado in a red uniform tarnished by the elements. Traveling on horseback, the three outsiders march to Harry Allouche’s alluring score, which sounds like a cautious invitation to the unknown, as if daring them to keep forward at their own peril."
 
Carlos Aguilar, The Playlist 

"Haberle and cinematographer Simone D’Arcangelo present stark imagery in their pristinely cropped wide shots of placid countrysides, these seemingly scenic vistas given a jittery edge from the sharp strings of Harry Allouche’s score. 'The Settlers' is very clearly a Western, defined by a methodical pace; the slow trek across the land luxuriates in plentiful shots of nature. But unlike the clean digital look that accompanies many modern spins on the genre, a noticeable grain and faded color grading make it seem as though we’re viewing long-abandoned film stock not meant to be seen."
 
Elijah Gonzalez, Paste Magazine
 
"For much of its opening and middle sections, 'The Settlers' functions like a three-handed western where the clashing personalities of Bill and the lieutenant -- who we find out is, in fact, a private -- come to a head while Segundo silently looks on. Divided into chapters with headings, and backed by a score from Harry Allouche with some echoes of Ennio Morricone, the film can feel a bit gimmicky when it leans too hard into the trappings of the genre, wearing its postmodernism all too prominently on its sleeve."
 
Jordan Mintzer, The Hollywood Reporter 

THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films in Los Angeles-area theaters.

February 9
BEFORE SUNRISE, BEFORE SUNSET [Alamo Drafthouse] 

BOOGIE NIGHTS (Michael Penn) [BrainDead Studios]
BULLITT (Lalo Schifrin) [Nuart]
CEMETERY MAN (Manuel De Sica) [Los Feliz 3]

CURE (Gary Ashiya) [Egyptian]
DAYS OF HEAVEN (Ennio Morricone) [New Beverly]
DEATH WISH (Herbie Hancock), STRAW DOGS (Jerry Fielding) [Vista]
DUEL (Billy Goldenberg) [Egyptian]
A GOOFY MOVIE (Carter Burwell), BEBE'S KIDS (John Barnes) [New Beverly]
MANDINGO (Maurice Jarre) [Vista]
M3GAN (Anthony Willis) [Alamo Drafthouse]
PADDINGTON 2 (Dario Marianelli) [Vidiots]
PULP FICTION [New Beverly]
SHAFT (Isaac Hayes) [Vidiots]
VAYA (Joel Assaizky) [Academy Museum]
THE WICKER MAN (Paul Giovanni) [Vidiots]

February 10
ACROSS THE UNIVERSE (Elliot Goldenthal) [Vidiots]
AIRPLANE! (Elmer Bernstein) [Egyptian]
BEFORE SUNRISE, BEFORE SUNSET [Alamo Drafthouse]
BULLITT (Lalo Schifrin) [Vidiots]
CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON (Tan Dun) [Alamo Drafthouse]
DEATH WISH (Herbie Hancock), STRAW DOGS (Jerry Fielding) [Vista]
THE FRESHMAN [Los Feliz 3]
GHOST IN THE SHELL (Kenji Kawai) [BrainDead Studios]
A GOOFY MOVIE (Carter Burwell), BEBE'S KIDS (John Barnes) [New Beverly] 
THE GREAT RACE (Henry Mancini) [Academy Museum]
HOLLYWOOD OR BUST (Walter Scharf) [Vista]
LADY AND THE TRAMP (Oliver Wallace) [New Beverly]
MANDINGO (Maurice Jarre) [Vista] 
THE MASTER (Jonny Greenwood) [Egyptian]
MY BLOODY VALENTINE (Paul Zaza) [New Beverly]
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (Leonard Rosenman) [New Beverly]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart]
RUNAWAY BRIDE (James Newton Howard) [Alamo Drafthouse]
SPIDER-MAN: ACROSS THE SPIDER-VERSE (Daniel Pemberton) [Vidiots]
A STAR IS BORN [Aero]
TWILIGHT (Carter Burwell) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE WEDDING SINGER (Teddy Castellucci) [Landmark Westwood]

February 11
ACTION JACKSON (Herbie Hancock, Michael Kamen) [Vidiots]
THE BEST MAN (Stanley Clarke) [Alamo Drafthouse]
CARMEN JONES (Georges Bizet, Herschel Burke Gilbert) [Vidiots]
CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON (Tan Dun) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
DEATH WISH (Herbie Hancock), STRAW DOGS (Jerry Fielding) [Vista]
DREAMGIRLS (Henry Krieger, Stephen Trask) [Academy Museum]
FLESH AND THE DEVIL [UCLA/Hammer]
A GOOFY MOVIE (Carter Burwell), BEBE'S KIDS (John Barnes) [New Beverly] 
HOLLYWOOD OR BUST (Walter Scharf) [Vista] 
HORSE FEATHERS [Los Feliz 3]
MISSISSIPPI MASALA (L. Subramanian) [Alamo Drafthouse]
ONG-BAK (Romanic Laurence, Richard Wells) [BrainDead Studios]
ORPHEUS (Georges Auric) [Los Feliz 3]
PADDINGTON 2 (Dario Marianelli) [Vidiots]
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (Leonard Rosenman) [New Beverly] 
SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (Danny Elfman) [Los Feliz 3]
THERE WILL BE BLOOD (Jonny Greenwood) [Egyptian]
TWILIGHT (Carter Burwell) [Alamo Drafthouse]

February 12
THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (Tony Cora) [Alamo Drafthouse]
COMRADES, ALMOST A LOVE STORY (Tsang-Hei Chu), CUPID ONE (Tony Lo, San Wong) [New Beverly]
THE FAVOURITE [Aero]
MISSISSIPPI MASALA (L. Subramanian) [Alamo Drafthouse] 
SHE'S ALL THAT (Stewart Copeland) [Alamo Drafthouse]
TAMPOPO (Kunihiko Murai) [Vidiots]

February 13
BONNIE AND CLYDE (Charles Strouse), TRUE ROMANCE (Hans Zimmer) [New Beverly]
CLUELESS (David Kitay) [Los Feliz 3]
CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON (Tan Dun) [Alamo Drafthouse]  
EL CONDE (Juan Pablo Ávalo, Marisol García) [Aero]
THE GRADUATE (Dave Grusin) [Landmark Pasadena]
KISS ME DEADLY (Frank DeVol) [Los Feliz 3]
PUNCH-DRUNK LOVE (Jon Brion) [BrainDead Studios]
SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON (William Alwyn), DR. SYN, ALIAS THE SCARECROW (Gerald Schurmann) [Vista] 
THEY CAME TOGETHER (Craig Wedren, Matt Novack) [Alamo Drafthouse]

February 14
BONNIE AND CLYDE (Charles Strouse), TRUE ROMANCE (Hans Zimmer) [New Beverly]
CASABLANCA (Max Steiner) [Academy Museum]
CASABLANCA (Max Steiner) [Aero]
CEMETERY MAN (Manuel De Sica) [Los Feliz 3]
L.A. STORY (Peter Rodgers Melnick) [Los Feliz 3]
M3GAN (Anthony Willis) [Alamo Drafthouse]
NINE TO FIVE (Charles Fox) [Academy Museum]
PARTY GIRL (Anton Sanko) [Vidiots]
TWILIGHT (Carter Burwell) [Alamo Drafthouse]
WHAT'S UP, DOC? (Artie Butler), THE WAR BETWEEN MEN AND WOMEN (Marvin Hamlisch) [Vista]

February 15
BLADE (Mark Isham) [Vidiots]
BOB & CAROL & TED & ALICE (Quincy Jones) [Los Feliz 3]
BONNIE AND CLYDE (Charles Strouse), TRUE ROMANCE (Hans Zimmer) [New Beverly]
WHAT'S UP, DOC? (Artie Butler), THE WAR BETWEEN MEN AND WOMEN (Marvin Hamlisch) [Vista]

February 16
AMERICAN HUSTLE (Danny Elfman) [Los Feliz 3]
CASABLANCA (Max Steiner), BEFORE SUNSET [New Beverly]
DEVIL IN A BLUE DRESS (Elmer Bernstein) [Alamo Drafthouse]
ED WOOD (Howard Shore) [Nuart]
EXISTENZ (Howard Shore) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE GUEST (Steve Moore) [Vidiots]
HALLOWEEN III: SEASON OF THE WITCH (John Carpenter, Alan Howarth) [Vidiots]
HAROLD AND MAUDE (Cat Stevens) [New Beverly]
NIEGE (Francois Breant, Bernard Lavilliers), LA GARCE (Philippe Sarde) [Academy Museum]
THE OMEGA MAN (Ron Grainer) [Vista]
PULP FICTION [New Beverly]
REBECCA (Franz Waxman) [Egyptian]
UMBERTO D. (Alessandro Cignognini) [UCLA/Hammer]
THE WILD BUNCH (Jerry Fielding), ONE EYED JACKS (Hugo Friedhofer) [Vista]
THE WOMAN CHASER [Alamo Drafthouse]

February 17
AMELIE (Yann Tiersen) [Vidiots]
BADLANDS (George Aliceson Tipton) [Los Feliz 3]
THE BICYCLE THIEF (Alessandro Cigognini) [Egyptian]
CASABLANCA (Max Steiner), BEFORE SUNSET [New Beverly]
THE CRAFT (Graeme Revell) [BrainDead Studios]
DROP DEAD GORGEOUS (Mark Mothersbaugh)  [Alamo Drafthouse]
ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (Jon Brion) [Landmark Westwood]
GANJA & HESS (Sam Waymon) [Vidiots]
GHOST DOG: THE WAY OF THE SAMURAI (RZA) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE GREAT MOUSE DETECTIVE (Henry Mancini) [Academy Museum]
HEART OF A DOG (Laurie Anderson), WATERSHIP DOWN (Angela Morley) [UCLA/Hammer]
IT FOLLOWS (Disasterpeace) [New Beverly]
LIVING IT UP (Walter Scharf) [Vista]
THE MUPPET MOVIE (Paul Williams, Kenny Ascher) [New Beverly]
THE OMEGA MAN (Ron Grainer) [Vista] 
THE PARENT TRAP (Alan Silvestri) [Vidiots]
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (Richard O'Brien, Richard Hartley) [Nuart]
THREE KINGS (Carter Burwell) [Alamo Drafthouse]
TOKYO STORY (Takanobu Saito) [Vidiots]
THE WILD BUNCH (Jerry Fielding), ONE EYED JACKS (Hugo Friedhofer) [Vista]

February 18
BEAU TRAVAIL (Charles Henri de Pierrefeu, Eran Tzur) [Alamo Drafthouse]
CASABLANCA (Max Steiner), BEFORE SUNSET [New Beverly]
DAYS OF HEAVEN (Ennio Morricone) [Vidiots]
DICK (John Debney) [Alamo Drafthouse]
EXISTENZ (Howard Shore) [Alamo Drafthouse]
EXOTICA (Mychael Danna) [Vidiots]
LIVING IT UP (Walter Scharf) [Vista] 
MALLRATS (Ira Newborn) [BrainDead Studios]
THE MUPPET MOVIE (Paul Williams, Kenny Ascher) [New Beverly]
RAY (Craig Armstrong) [Academy Museum]
REBECCA (Franz Waxman) [Egyptian]
THE SAGA OF GOSTA BERLING [UCLA/Hammer]
SESAME STREET PRESENTS: FOLLOW THAT BIRD (Van Dyke Parks, Lennie Niehaus) [Vidiots]
THE VIRGIN SUICIDES (Air) [Alamo Drafthouse]
THE WILD BUNCH (Jerry Fielding) [Fine Arts]
THE WILD BUNCH (Jerry Fielding), ONE EYED JACKS (Hugo Friedhofer) [Vista] 
WINCHESTER '73 [Egyptian]


THINGS I'VE HEARD, READ, SEEN OR WATCHED LATELY

Heard:
The King and I (Rodgers); The Butcher Boy (Goldenthal); Mission: Impossible - Dead Reckoning Part One: Suites and Themes (Balfe); Sayonara (Waxman); The War with Grandpa (Lennertz); In Dreams (Goldenthal); Greta (Navarrete); The Journey of Natty Gann (Bernstein); The End of the Affair (Nyman)

Read: The Burglar Who Thought He Was Bogart, by Lawrence Block

Seen: Argylle; Altered States; The Lair of the White Worm; Lift [2024]; American Symphony; Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 3; Assault on Precinct 13 [1976]; Sheba, Baby; Four Daughters; 20 Days in Mariupol

Watched: When Time Ran Out; Legion ("Chapter 5"); Silicon Valley ("The Empty Chair"); The Night the Bridge Fell Down, Part One; The Mandalorian ("The Mandalorian"); 30 Rock ("Secret Santa")

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Today in Film Score History:
March 3
Arthur Kempel died (2004)
Basil Poledouris records his score for the Twilight Zone episode “Profile in Silver” (1986)
Jeff Rona born (1957)
Jerry Goldsmith records his score for the "Time Out" segment of Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983)
John Williams begins recording his score for Jaws (1975)
Kazimierz Serocki born (1922)
Lee Holdridge born (1944)
Leonard Rosenman begins recording his unused score for The Last Hard Men (1976)
Peter Ivers died (1983)
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