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 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 2:11 AM   
 By:   johnbijl   (Member)

Kamen said it was rejected because the filmmakers thought it was "too liturgical."

).


that's pretty much it.
the film deals with the afterlife in a non-religious manner.
ennio scored it with a Roman Catholic 'feel'
brm


Sounds logical. I can agree with that. And considering Morricone's temper, I wouldn't exclude that he refused to see the film any other way.

On the other hand, when you hire a Italian composer who literally lives within walking distance of the Vatican, what were you expecting?

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 2:14 AM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

Kamen said it was rejected because the filmmakers thought it was "too liturgical."

).


that's pretty much it.
the film deals with the afterlife in a non-religious manner.
ennio scored it with a Roman Catholic 'feel'
brm


If this ever gets a release, I'll have to order 2 copies so I can send one to the Pope...

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 3:33 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Both movie and scores did little for me... even the rejected Morricone I gave a shot but just didn't connect with it. I would like to see the original cut of this movie.

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 4:16 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

Simply put: The film tested horribly (they ended up reshooting a bunch of it) and usually the first thing to go is the score (I actually saw the Morricone version years ago. I had a buddy at Interscope who got me into a screening). I can see why the producer's freaked because they had this $60 million arthouse flick with a gorgeous, albeit, unusual score. I personally felt it was incredible and that the film was pretty powerful as is.

The producer's also had a hard-on for Michael ever since Mr Holland's Opus and were more than happy to toss Morricone for Kamen.

Morricone's scores is one of my last Holy Grails!

As for that original cut it has a very depressing ending.

MV



MV: I presume if it was remotely possible to do, your label would jump on it right?

I'd buy.

Cheers

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 4:41 AM   
 By:   PIERREP   (Member)

i have a cd RED SONJA / WHAT DREAMS MAY COME that is as good as any other label product. The artwork is perfect and the sound is almost perfect. There is no way to know that this is bootleg ! Its still available at ARKSQUARE. I also had another one on a different bootleg but the product was very second rate.

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 5:02 AM   
 By:   johnbijl   (Member)

here is no way to know that this is bootleg

Tell that to the right holder. Or better yet: to Morricone's face.

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 5:47 AM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)

i have a cd RED SONJA / WHAT DREAMS MAY COME that is as good as any other label product.

That pretty much says it all, doesn't it? big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 6:06 AM   
 By:   PIERREP   (Member)

i just mean that until a label do it (if ever) its the only way to have it ! its well done ,thats all !

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 9:31 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

PIERREP,

Whilst I realize you are only trying to be helpful to those who wish to acquire the score, you may be unaware that we are guests of Film Score Monthly when we use this site and they are people who get directly hurt by soundtrack piracy. When it comes to bootlegs, one of the house rules is to not promote them. Yes, they are a fact of life, people buy them and I'm sure those who really want it will be aware of it. But this is not a place to promote them.

Anyway, what we really need is the complete score and in high quality.

Cheers

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   jamesluckard   (Member)

MV - what was the original ending? (SPOILER) Could he not get her back from hell?


Presumably this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What_Dreams_May_Come_%28film%29

SPOILER The special edition DVD shows an alternate ending — the ending from the novel — in which the reincarnation is not a choice, but part of the natural order. Chris and Annie will meet again in their new lives, but Annie must atone for killing herself — her new incarnation will die young, and Chris will spend the remainder of this life as a widower before the two are again reunited in Heaven. The film then goes to Sri Lanka where a woman is giving birth to a girl, presumed to be Annie. In Philadelphia, a boy is born, presumably Chris.

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 10:40 AM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Wow, that's a rough ending, isn't it? I'm all for movies making uncompromising choices, but this movie starts with the deaths of two children, then their father, and their dog (!), before proceeding to their mother's suicide! All to service a special effects extravaganza that, while sometimes striking, all added up to a bunch of hooey to me. So the feel-good ending was supposed to be a feel-bad ending? Yikes!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 12:48 PM   
 By:   Jon Broxton   (Member)

This is the exact quote from the interview that James Southall and I did with Michael Kamen when WHAT DREAMS MAY COME FIRST CAME OUT:

=========================

JS: The first thing we wanted to ask you about is What Dreams May Come. How did you get that? How did that come about?

MK: By accident. I think some of the best things in life happen by accident. It was at the expense of a man that I admire tremendously, and I have to be as philosophical and self-aggrandising at the same time as I can be. I'm happy that I got that score. I probably would have been happier had they come to me first, but the fact that they went to Ennio Morricone, whose work I really admire, personally admire, and enjoy, the fact that they went to him for the score was understandable. The fact that his score, for one reason or another, didn't fit their bill, was also kind of understandable, because he chose... you know... a film composer looks at the story and comes up with musical solutions for that story. There are many, many solutions that one could choose - there are many ways to skin a cat, you know.What Ennio reacted to, I think, was the very serious, touching, philosophical and metaphysical nature of the film.

The film is a very serious one, and concerns death and love, two fantastic themes to be involved in musically. The first time I looked at the film, the first event you see in the film of any significance, two minutes in, is the children, who are the product of this whirlwind relationship you see forming, a fifteen year marriage takes place and you meet the family and their kids at breakfast and, two minutes later, he's waving goodbye to them in the car, and the camera suddenly slows down and he says "that's the last time we saw the children alive". And that's the beginning of the film, that's the first thing you see and it knocks you for six, it just takes all the stuffing out of you. As a father, to even contemplate that reality is so beyond the bounds of reason. If you choose to dwell on the tragedy of that moment, if you choose to dwell on the profound sadness and sense of loss, you could easily write a very profound piece of music that would make the rest of the film unwatchable. You can't go any further. The first time I saw the movie I would burst into tears roughly every three minutes. I was a mess, I was a pile of jelly on the floor, and I realised the only way to help people to listen to this story, to watch this story, to see it unfold, was to treat it as a love story, which eventually you realise it is. It's a very moving, very profound, very touching love story, about the depth of his feeling for his wife, and her depth of her feeling for him, and the meaning of life, the meaning of life as it is being lived, not the metaphysics of life beyond the grave.

I have mixed feelings about that. I have a deep respect for people that have a metaphysical outlook on life, and I'm very keen to share that, but I have to confess that my own feeling is that we are what we are, that this is now and this is the only dance that there is, and it's that kind of 'be here now' philosophy. If there's a payoff in the next life - great! You know, I intend to be as good a person as I can in this one and, sure, it might result in something, but I certainly can't live for the next life. I'm not as filled with faith or dedication as Bach was, who wrote everything for the glory of God, everything was with a certainty that he would be dwelling in heaven for eternity. I'm not so lucky, you know. I heard Richard Dreyfuss once say in an interview, when he was playing a preacher, I think, in a film and somebody was interviewing him and said, "Do you believe in God, Mr. Dreyfuss?", and he said "Nah, put it this way - I'm an agnostic who's willing to be convinced!" I have to share that.

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 12:58 PM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)

Been listening to the score on Youtube, and WOW, what a score!

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 12:59 PM   
 By:   La La Land Records   (Member)

MV - what was the original ending? (SPOILER) Could he not get her back from hell?


Presumably this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What_Dreams_May_Come_%28film%29

SPOILER The special edition DVD shows an alternate ending — the ending from the novel — in which the reincarnation is not a choice, but part of the natural order. Chris and Annie will meet again in their new lives, but Annie must atone for killing herself — her new incarnation will die young, and Chris will spend the remainder of this life as a widower before the two are again reunited in Heaven. The film then goes to Sri Lanka where a woman is giving birth to a girl, presumed to be Annie. In Philadelphia, a boy is born, presumably Chris.


If I recall the ending I saw correctly he makes a decision to stay with her in Purgatory/Hell for all eternity. The camera slowly pulls out and above them and the film ends.

Talk about a downer ending!

lol

MV

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 1:16 PM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

I think that's the ending I saw--it was at some screening with the director present, and I remember they described the score as "temporary" and basically denied that it was the Morricone score, but it was Morricone's. And it seemed right for the film which WAS an incredibly dark and haunting piece of work (it's about a journey to Hell after all). I just remember Kamen's score (combined with Cuba Gooding Jr.'s "magical black person" presence) seemed overly bright and hopeful considering the story.
...I also remember thinking, "So...HOW do they know she went to Hell again?" It's a daring attempt to visualize all these metaphysical ideas, but how you sell that as some kind of uplifting, romantic movie is beyond me.

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 1:20 PM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

I think that's the ending I saw--it was at some screening with the director present, and I remember they described the score as "temporary" and basically denied that it was the Morricone score, but it was Morricone's. And it seemed right for the film which WAS an incredibly dark and haunting piece of work (it's about a journey to Hell after all). I just remember Kamen's score (combined with Cuba Gooding Jr.'s "magical black person" presence) seemed overly bright and hopeful considering the story.
...I also remember thinking, "So...HOW do they know she went to Hell again?" It's a daring attempt to visualize all these metaphysical ideas, but how you sell that as some kind of uplifting, romantic movie is beyond me.


The temporary line might just be a thing they always say. They said the same thing before the test screening of Zodiac that I saw, months before the film was released, but it was Shire, all right.

 
 Posted:   Apr 11, 2014 - 2:03 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

I used to own this but i stupidly loaned it to a "friend", who never bothered to return it
brm

ps wink


Okay, okay, okay. I'll bring it back the next visit, you goof. wink

Greg Espinoza


THE PARALLAX VIEW too?
smile

 
 Posted:   Apr 11, 2014 - 2:07 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

I think it is tragic that Vincent Ward didn't have the career he deserved.

IMHO he is a much better fillmaker than fellow New Zealander Peter Jackson.

In fact, based on the few films he directed i consider Ward a visonary talent with the visual flair of a Tim Burton.
Check out MAP OF THE HUMAN HEART to see what this guy could put up on the screen.
Even with its acknowledged flaws, DREAMS is a unique, powerful film that broke new ground in the sfx department.

check 'em out!
brm

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2014 - 4:44 AM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

I've always thought there are similarities between this score and the score to the film 'Fateless', which Morricone composed in 2004. Has anyone else noticed?

 
 Posted:   Apr 12, 2014 - 12:20 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

I've always thought there are similarities between this score and the score to the film 'Fateless', which Morricone composed in 2004. Has anyone else noticed?

DAYS OF HEAVEN - the allegro theme is very similar (that's the baroque sounding one)
brm

 
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