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 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 10:05 AM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)

there are published listings of the copyrighted versions of films. When MGM first copyrighted the film, it includes the lenth of footage for the film, and, as I remember, that length is the same length the film is now.

I have a rodshoaw pressbook and the running time is 173 min.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 10:40 AM   
 By:   John Black   (Member)

I'll be ordering this in early November, as soon as I get paid. I'm "busted flat in Baton Rouge" for the rest of this month, however.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   John Black   (Member)

I'll be ordering this in early November, as soon as I get paid. I'm "busted flat in Baton Rouge" for the rest of this month, however.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   John Black   (Member)

I'll be ordering this in early November, as soon as I get paid. I'm "busted flat in Baton Rouge" for the rest of this month, however.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 10:56 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)



No, they don't. Rózsa's own recording from the 1970s cannot be bettered for precision of playing nor resplendence of sound. The Prague versions sound perfectly adequate though, and it's the complete score. I'll certainly buy it.


*starts to reply*

*sees who wrote that*

Oh right, don't want to feel the idiotic trolls.

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 11:34 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Ithought it had mentioned in an earlier thread that rozsa really did not write an Overture from the film. That the first piece reallly and truly is the Intermission Music.
So, I was surprised to see it listed as the first piece on the cd at all.


Rhino did the same with its complete release of Previn's THE 4 HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE score, taking the Entr'acte and repositioning it first to serve as an Overture for the album. I'm sure that Previn would have approved of their decision, as would have Rozsa for the new release.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 3:32 PM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)

the point is - did Rozsa actually ever write an Overture.
there is NO intermission music where there should be. did he actually write something for that?

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 3:53 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

It seems very clear that the Entr'Acte was composed as an entr'acte, and was used by various releases as an Overture. That's what they're saying. It's no big deal: many films used Overtures as Intermezzos. The idea is to create a good intro that is as varied as possible in the first 10 minutes or so, to show the variety of the score. The Prelude is great, but also abrupt and short for a great epic score.

There is clearly also a 'Prelude to Act II' which serves, as with 'Gone With the Wind' as an Intermezzo to return beams to seats.


I'm amazed to see 'Upon These Lilies' ..... that's completeness for you!


The thing that makes this music great for the bigger world music, and lifts it far above the average Hollywood quasi-religio syrup is the use throughout of period melodies by Rozsa. He cared a lot about that, and it takes the thing away from mere theatrical music to a serious work. Hearing resurrections of ancient music from the 2nd. Century AD and before is something precious. It would please Rozsa immensely, this being one of his favourite of his own scores. He absorbed himself in it. And his innate good taste keeps the schmaltz at bay.

There'll be a lot of revelations too. Many things not in the OST are here, deletions etc.. As with all his 'epic' scores Rozsa opens up a window into a world and invites us to be lost in it, a complex landscape of a world, very varied, but consistent.

Thanks to Tadlow and Prometheus for a monumental undertaking.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2012 - 10:43 PM   
 By:   JamesFitz   (Member)

It seems very clear that the Entr'Acte was composed as an entr'acte, and was used by various releases as an Overture. That's what they're saying. It's no big deal: many films used Overtures as Intermezzos. The idea is to create a good intro that is as varied as possible in the first 10 minutes or so, to show the variety of the score. The Prelude is great, but also abrupt and short for a great epic score.

There is clearly also a 'Prelude to Act II' which serves, as with 'Gone With the Wind' as an Intermezzo to return beams to seats.


I'm amazed to see 'Upon These Lilies' ..... that's completeness for you!


The thing that makes this music great for the bigger world music, and lifts it far above the average Hollywood quasi-religio syrup is the use throughout of period melodies by Rozsa. He cared a lot about that, and it takes the thing away from mere theatrical music to a serious work. Hearing resurrections of ancient music from the 2nd. Century AD and before is something precious. It would please Rozsa immensely, this being one of his favourite of his own scores. He absorbed himself in it. And his innate good taste keeps the schmaltz at bay.

There'll be a lot of revelations too. Many things not in the OST are here, deletions etc.. As with all his 'epic' scores Rozsa opens up a window into a world and invites us to be lost in it, a complex landscape of a world, very varied, but consistent.

Thanks to Tadlow and Prometheus for a monumental undertaking.


After I finished mastering the CD in May, I have not listened to the music since....I revisited it again today...and must say I feel proud to have been asked to undertake such and awe-inspiring recording! Thank you Luc Van de Ven for your vision and enthusiasm!

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 2:25 AM   
 By:   Hank V   (Member)



"I feel proud to have been asked to undertake such and awe-inspiring recording! Thank you Luc Van de Ven for your vision and enthusiasm!"


Its going to be an adventure to hear it complete for the first time. Years ago I remember hunting around for every recorded bit of music and now we are to have it laid before us. You may well feel proud and correctly direct our attention to Luc Van de Ven who seems to remain at a low profile. The mp3 samples sound great so its a case of wait in anticipation for the full stereo blast.

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 5:34 AM   
 By:   goldsmith-rulez   (Member)



No, they don't. Rózsa's own recording from the 1970s cannot be bettered for precision of playing nor resplendence of sound. The Prague versions sound perfectly adequate though, and it's the complete score. I'll certainly buy it.


*starts to reply*

*sees who wrote that*

Oh right, don't want to feel the idiotic trolls.


Says someone whose few opinions are completely worthless, and who's mooching all of his music off of countless sharing sites.

Ahh, I loved the days when any evaluation of a recording south of "super duper" wasn't deemed beneath contempt. The days when people had taste and a sense of judgement. What's wrong with "perfectly adequate"?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 6:25 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

and who's mooching all of his music off of countless sharing sites.


Oh sure, I must be imagining the 4000 CDs all over the room I'm in.

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 6:28 AM   
 By:   goldsmith-rulez   (Member)

Yes. Because they're all CD-Rs.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 6:34 AM   
 By:   JamesFitz   (Member)



No, they don't. Rózsa's own recording from the 1970s cannot be bettered for precision of playing nor resplendence of sound. The Prague versions sound perfectly adequate though, and it's the complete score. I'll certainly buy it.


*starts to reply*

*sees who wrote that*

Oh right, don't want to feel the idiotic trolls.


Says someone whose few opinions are completely worthless, and who's mooching all of his music off of countless sharing sites.

Ahh, I loved the days when any evaluation of a recording south of "super duper" wasn't deemed beneath contempt. The days when people had taste and a sense of judgement. What's wrong with "perfectly adequate"?


Perfectly adequate is a perfectly adequate description...and could certainly also be applied to the RPO 19070's recording aswell....not just because of the lacklustre tempos and the unnatural phrase 4 recording balance... but in my researches for the new Quo Vadis I went back to my RPO recording and was shocked to hear no less than 3 bad horns splits on the album and quite a number of moments of poor ensemble and intonation. Funny how the memory plays tricks...but I still love the album as a whole.

However, I would certainly not want to say the Czech players are any better than the RPO...as I know of your total prejudice about any music coming from the CZ. All I can say is that I represent not only the CoPPO but also the RPO ... and have produced many albums for both....and I know which orchestra I generally prefer.

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   goldsmith-rulez   (Member)

However, I would certainly not want to say the Czech players are any better than the RPO...as I know of your total prejudice about any music coming from the CZ. All I can say is that I represent not only the CoPPO but also the RPO ... and have produced many albums for both....and I know which orchestra I generally prefer.

It's not prejudice. It's a decade and a half of listening experience during which they have risen from undisciplined and insecure to perfectly adequate.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 7:12 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

If you've read the comparative accounts of the Prague and London sessions in Pro Musica Sana, you must recall how Rozsa had only six hours to make his Decca recording, with many precious moments wasted making necessary corrections on the manually copied parts. In Prague, by contrast, they devoted nearly a week to the recording, and the music had already been vetted through computer input.

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 7:16 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)


It's not prejudice. It's a decade and a half of listening experience during which they have risen from undisciplined and insecure to perfectly adequate.




What does this achieve? Everybody's a critic. The CDs haven't even been released yet, let alone heard.

Alan Hamer of the Rozsa society and others were actually present at the RPO/Saltarello recordings (and also these recent Tadlow ones), and they could verify (and have done) that those '70s sessions were very short. Several planned tracks like the Bacchanale had to be omitted for no other reason than time.

That's why the Decca album is very precise, a consequence of slow performance. Rozsa took it at the tempo he could with no rehearsal time worth mentioning. Serendipitously, that created its own good special quality, a sort of mystical 'pure' feel, but this is different, trying to reconstruct the feel of the OST performances.

Plus, everyone knows the Prague people have really developed and improved over the period mentioned, so it's disingenuous to suggest they haven't.


P.S. Whoops, James beat me to it about the time thing, above!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 7:44 AM   
 By:   JamesFitz   (Member)


It's not prejudice. It's a decade and a half of listening experience during which they have risen from undisciplined and insecure to perfectly adequate.




What does this achieve? Everybody's a critic. The CDs haven't even been released yet, let alone heard.

Alan Hamer of the Rozsa society and others were actually present at the RPO/Saltarello recordings (and also these recent Tadlow ones), and they could verify (and have done) that those '70s sessions were very short. Several planned tracks like the Bacchanale had to be omitted for no other reason than time.

That's why the Decca album is very precise, a consequence of slow performance. Rozsa took it at the tempo he could with no rehearsal time worth mentioning. Serendipitously, that created its own good special quality, a sort of mystical 'pure' feel, but this is different, trying to reconstruct the feel of the OST performances.

Plus, everyone knows the Prague people have really developed and improved over the period mentioned, so it's disingenuous to suggest they haven't.


P.S. Whoops, James beat me to it about the time thing, above!


Actually, we really did not have much longer to record than the RPO as we have 3 times the amount of music to do...including a few very, very tricky source cues! And, we did not have any rehearsal time...as the Rozsa Soc members can attest to... Just 10 minutes sound balance at the beginning of session 1 .. then we were off and having to average about 20 minutes of music per session... pretty much the same average as Rozsa and the RPO !!!

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 7:57 AM   
 By:   goldsmith-rulez   (Member)

Plus, everyone knows the Prague people have really developed and improved over the period mentioned.

Ahem. Which is what I said.

 
 Posted:   Oct 25, 2012 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

To James Fitz

When do they ship from UK to Uk,

Ta

 
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