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 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 10:00 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

It's good writing for sure.

The era sounds late '50s/early '60s, with the emphasis on the latter.

He's using a lot of open fifths I think, which is a convention for historical scores, but since it's not a horror movie, then it's possibly something with horses, there's a galloping rhythm at some points. I don't feel it's film noir because by the 1960s, crime movies (hey, let's steer clear of the old 'what's a film noir' definition game) were moved well towards a jazzier style.

Is the eight note motif a main theme of the film? The one you hear throughout, for instance on woodwinds at around 1:14?

He sounds like a Hollywood composer, but there's an English feel to some of the string and woodwind stuff. Is this a historical film set in England, scored by an American? The tune doesn't leap out as something in any pastiche style, but in full strings it could be ardent and heroic/romantic if it had to be.

 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 10:02 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Actually, it sounds like Edwin Astley in places?

In Britain, crime series like 'The Saint' etc. were still using the old style groupings in TV stuff, when the US had more or less gone jazz for that. I still think it has a 'historical' feel though.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 10:26 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Anyone with any kind of soundtrack knowledge would recognize it as the work of Joseph Mullendore.


Did he do film work? Only know him from TV.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 4:43 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

"Anyone with any kind of soundtrack knowledge would recognize it as the work of Joseph Mullendore. Or someone like that."

Can't argue with a statement like that...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 4:55 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Anyone with any kind of soundtrack knowledge would recognize it as the work of Joseph Mullendore.


Did he do film work? Only know him from TV.



His only film scores were "New York Confidential" and "I Deal In Danger" (a two part episode of the television series "Blue Light" of which Pt. 2 was scored by Lalo Schifrin).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2013 - 7:28 AM   
 By:   lupoprezzo   (Member)


He sounds like a Hollywood composer, but there's an English feel to some of the string and woodwind stuff.


Good description. Kenneth V. Jones comes to my mind and some parts remind me of Elizabeth Lutyens, but I doubt it's one of them.

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2013 - 12:40 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

"Anyone with any kind of soundtrack knowledge would recognize it as the work of Joseph Mullendore. Or someone like that."

Can't argue with a statement like that...


But...it's not Mullendore, right?

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2013 - 1:09 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

No, it's not Mullendore. Right. Nobody has guessed it on this thread. I wonder if I might be wrong about who wrote the music? No, I just talked to him two days ago and he swears he wrote it... (that's a clue)

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2013 - 3:35 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

......No, I just talked to him two days ago and he swears he wrote it... (that's a clue).....

That's a really great clue!

Now we know it's a man.....he's alive.....he can actually write music down, not just hum it for someone else to copy and, most importantly.....it's someone who swears!!! smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2013 - 4:24 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

No, I just talked to him two days ago and he swears he wrote it... (that's a clue)

Fred Katz?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2013 - 6:35 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

nope...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2013 - 9:48 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Ken Thorne?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2013 - 9:55 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO MMM- Make 2 people happy on this board , put out The indestructible man-56- and The hearse-80-thank you.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 10, 2013 - 11:55 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

If I charged the two people $15,000 each, then I'd make three people happy, the third being me.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2013 - 5:24 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

If I charged the two people $15,000 each, then I'd make three people happy, the third being me.

I'm glad to see one of the labels is more concerned with quality, not quantity.
If you want to make one person happy, how about some Sawtell noir music (Raw Deal, Black Magic)? I'll pay the $30,000 for single copy releases.

 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2013 - 5:28 AM   
 By:   Lokutus   (Member)

Well, Sawtell would make me happy too...
even more so if it is DOG OF FLANDERS smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2013 - 5:52 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

now you see, I'm not interested in that Flanders score, so you'll just have to foot the $30k cost of it yourself.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2013 - 8:53 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Johnny Mandel?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 11:39 AM   
 By:   MI6   (Member)

The music sounds pretty dated. It probably came from a film made between 1955 and 1965.

There are some similarities between this tune and the North By Northwest theme written by Bernard Herrmann. Film genre could be spy/action/thriller.

Whoever wrote this piece of music must be 70+ years old and alive when Dave last spoke with him.

Lalo Schrifin?

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 12:31 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Yes, it's 'dated' like the Sistene Chapel or Van Gogh's Sunflowers. It's dated like the moon landings.

Thank heaven the term 'dated' isn't necessarily a pejorative one.

It doesn't sound like NbNW and the primary thematic material is clearly that eight note repeated figure, which sounds strangely familar, I just can't place it.

It's most likely late '50s, early '60s, but I still say that predominance of open fourths suggests 'period drama'. Or English.

There's an urgency about that 5-note thing that suggests a war film or an espionage thing too. If it's historical, it's a swashbuckler.

The powers that be are silent on this issue.

If it wasn't for some of the xylo stuff, I'd almost think it was Ray Leppard, but it's probably an American, given his connections. Mind you, there are telephones now. He's somebody well versed in TV scores, I can feel that.

 
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