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 Posted:   Mar 2, 2010 - 8:52 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

I'm going to order Season 4 soon and I noticed Leonard Nimoy on the cover. Please, please don't tell me that Season 3 is Landau and Bain's last season? Please say it isn't true.

 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2010 - 9:06 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

I'm going to order Season 4 soon and I noticed Leonard Nimoy on the cover. Please, please don't tell me that Season 3 is Landau and Bain's last season? Please say it isn't true.


The Secretary got rid of these two agents because they asked too much money.
Paris (Nimoy) was free so they hired him as a replacement.
Don't worry season 4 is good enough and you won't be disappointed.

 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2010 - 10:16 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

I'm going to order Season 4 soon and I noticed Leonard Nimoy on the cover. Please, please don't tell me that Season 3 is Landau and Bain's last season? Please say it isn't true.


The Secretary got rid of these two agents because they asked too much money.
Paris (Nimoy) was free so they hired him as a replacement.
Don't worry season 4 is good enough and you won't be disappointed.


Damn. I only have 9 episodes left of season 3, then no more Rollin and no more Cinnamon. I'm depressed. But I'll get over it eventually. smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2010 - 10:44 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)


Paris (Nimoy) was free so they hired him as a replacement.


First, he had to get his ears bobbed. smile

S4 I think still maintains the classic format well with the only annoyance being no permanent replacement for Cinnamon. The large group of guest female agents is nice, but I would have preferred they'd settled on their final pick then and thus we would have been spared the Lesley Ann Warren debacle of S5.

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2010 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

Strange to think that Mr. Graves died this weekend probably within minutes or hours of when I had just watched a couple episodes of Mission: Impossible. Also, I watched THEM! on TCM this weekend, and not having seen a lot of James Arness, I was struck by how similar their voices were, something I hadn't noticed before.

Clearly, Mr. Phelps has decided to accept a new unearthly mission. All the best...

And to OUR Mr. Phelps, I saw you in another recent thread. About time you came back here! Your absence was noticed by a few of us. smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2010 - 8:02 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Strange to think that Mr. Graves died this weekend probably within minutes or hours of when I had just watched a couple episodes of Mission: Impossible. Also, I watched THEM! on TCM this weekend, and not having seen a lot of James Arness, I was struck by how similar their voices were, something I hadn't noticed before.

Clearly, Mr. Phelps has decided to accept a new unearthly mission. All the best...


What a shame that Mr. Graves wasn't asked to provide a commentary for one of the episodes, but I guess that's just in keeping with the "top secret" nature of the show. wink


And to OUR Mr. Phelps, I saw you in another recent thread. About time you came back here! Your absence was noticed by a few of us. smile


Thanks! This is one of the few message boards that I post at where my existence is acknowledged, let alone missed! wink

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2010 - 8:12 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

What a shame that Mr. Graves wasn't asked to provide a commentary for one of the episodes, but I guess that's just in keeping with the "top secret" nature of the show. wink


He does do a commentary for the lone episode of "Gunsmoke" he directed which like most of those commentaries is more an overview of his career in general. He mentioned how he and his brother never acted together once and when he tried to interest him in a project in the 80s, Jim just said that at that point he wasn't comfortable doing anything that wasn't set in the 19th century.

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2010 - 9:05 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Graves did speak at length to Patrick White for the M:I Dossier book, so at least we have that. I like the contract clause that no actor on M:I could get more money than Graves!

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2010 - 9:15 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

A guilty pleasure of mine is the wholesome family show called 7th Heaven. Graves was wonderful on it as "The Colonel", the grandfather of the clan. If I didn't know better, I'd swear he really was Stephen Collins' father!

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2010 - 9:22 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

A guilty pleasure of mine is the wholesome family show called 7th Heaven. Graves was wonderful on it as "The Colonel", the grandfather of the clan. If I didn't know better, I'd swear he really was Stephen Collins' father!

Having never watched 7th Heaven before, I stumbled upon an episode that had Graves in it and perhaps it's just nostalgia and seeing the old boy again, but he had such star power and charisma in the role. Kind of like when our parents or grandparents would see a Golden Age star on COLUMBO or some such show. The presence these old time stars have is just amazing.

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2010 - 9:46 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

A guilty pleasure of mine is the wholesome family show called 7th Heaven. Graves was wonderful on it as "The Colonel", the grandfather of the clan. If I didn't know better, I'd swear he really was Stephen Collins' father!

Having never watched 7th Heaven before, I stumbled upon an episode that had Graves in it and perhaps it's just nostalgia and seeing the old boy again, but he had such star power and charisma in the role. Kind of like when our parents or grandparents would see a Golden Age star on COLUMBO or some such show. The presence these old time stars have is just amazing.


Exactly right! The Columbo comparison is a good one. In 7th Heaven whenever Graves appears, you can almost hear trumpets and the sound of a red carpet being unrolled. He brings such a strong screen presence, and you get the sense that all of the other actors on the show are in awe of him. It was a primo role for him and he did more than just waltz through the show; he really made the character.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2010 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

To all,

Find an excellent review of "Mission: Impossible" season 1 DVD:
http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/read.php?ID=25407




I miss the old TV Guide. Ever since Rupert Murdoch acquired it, then sold it, then whatever, it's just not been the same.


You're right. It's gone downhill ever since they went to that magazine format, and it made me cancel my subscription.

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2010 - 3:37 AM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

Watch this ABC Movie of the Week:
"Where Have All The People Gone"
starring Peter Graves

http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category/scifi_and_fantasy/watch/v19538835xHmxDztp

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2010 - 8:10 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

Watch this ABC Movie of the Week:
"Where Have All The People Gone"
starring Peter Graves

http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category/scifi_and_fantasy/watch/v19538835xHmxDztp


I remember that movie from when I was a kid! Fun flick.

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2010 - 9:19 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Obit from the Sydney (Australia) Morning Herald:

Straight as a die and perfect at lampooning his own style

Peter Graves, 1926-2010



Despite his long career as a serious actor in dozens of films and TV shows, Peter Graves might be remembered most for a role that lampooned his square-jawed, stolid screen persona.

As the captain of a plane heading for disaster in the 1980 spoof movie Airplane! (released in Australia as Flying High), Graves got laughs by playing it as straight as his other roles.

Audiences were also familiar with Graves as the tall, gruff, deep-voiced, silver-haired Jim Phelps, head of the IMF (Impossible Missions Force), an elite US espionage group, in the TV series Mission: Impossible (1967-73). He won a Golden Globe for the role in 1971. The show famously opened with the words: 'Your mission, Jim, should you decide to accept it, is … '

Born Peter Aurness in Minnesota, of Norwegian-German stock, he was the son of Rolf Cirkler Aurness, a businessman, and Ruth Duesler, a journalist. After two years in the air force, Graves studied drama at the University of Minnesota. He adopted his grandfather's last name to avoid confusion with his older brother, the actor James Arness, who dropped the 'u' from the family name.

His first credited film roles were as a confused youngster in Rogue River (1951) and as Dane Clark's blind brother in the western Fort Defiance (1951).

In 1952, Graves was in The Congregation, produced by the Protestant Film Commission, an evangelical organisation, and had the leading role in Red Planet Mars, a McCarthyite tract in the guise of a Christian science fiction film.

Graves's first TV series was a children's show, Fury, about an orphan and his untamed black stallion. It was filmed in Australia and lasted six years.

Graves's blond, rather bland good looks were brilliantly used by Billy Wilder in Stalag 17 (1953), revolving around a German informer masquerading as an American PoW.

In 1955 Graves worked in four excellent films, though in minor roles. In Jacques Tourneur's Wichita he played Morgan Earp, brother of Wyatt, and he appeared as military men in John Ford's The Long Gray Line and Otto Preminger's The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell. He also had a small but key role in Charles Laughton's haunting The Night of the Hunter.

In the 1960s, Graves's stern face was seldom off the TV screen. He started the decade with 34 episodes of an Australian western series, Whiplash, in which he played an American, Christopher Cobb, who established the first stagecoach line in Australia in the 1850s.

He continued mostly in TV westerns until he hit the jackpot with Mission: Impossible.

Jim Abrahams, who wrote, directed and produced Airplane! thought Mission: Impossible 'was just so stupid and was great to send up'. He had the wit to cast the straight-as-a-die Graves as Captain Oveur, who at one point is seen at the helm with a young boy, Joey, of whom he asks questions such as: 'You ever seen a grown man naked?'; 'Joey, do you like movies about gladiators?'; and 'Have you ever been to a Turkish prison?'

It is hard to believe audiences ever took Graves seriously again but they did, and he returned to a new series of Mission: Impossible from 1988 to 1990.

From 1997 to 2007, Graves made a number of guest appearances as John 'The Colonel' Camden, the grandfather in the squeaky-clean Christian family in the TV series 7th Heaven.

A devout Christian, Graves is survived by Joan, his wife since 1950, and three daughters.


http://www.smh.com.au/national/obituaries/straight-as-a-die-and-perfect-at-lampooning-his-own-style-20100316-qcfc.html

 
 Posted:   Apr 15, 2010 - 7:42 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Been giving some S6 episodes another look recently...

"Underwater" is a strong episode, even if the usually great Fritz Weaver doesn't get to do much. OTOH Barney gets to do a lot more, even impersonating Demond Wilson's voice! I was also amused by the end, with Phelps in that striped shirt and hip glasses. At episode's end, you'll notice that after the cops come in to take down Weaver and co--with that great piano cue playing--Phelps goes out the door of what I'd guess is a place near the beach but as we see him go out the door to the awaiting IMF car, it's the Desilu lot and its familiar building fronts!

 
 Posted:   Apr 20, 2010 - 7:29 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Stone Pillow" from season 6:

I liked Peter Graves' "Professor" characterization and Bradford Dillman is always great. It was also refreshing to make Barney the warden instead of Phelps, which probably would've been the case in previous seasons. One of the things that I enjoy about the "Syndicate" years is the better use they make for Barney.

And now, some amusement...posted with affection, of course:

The DVD picture quality may be too good! At around the 9:23 mark, look at the right corner of Vochek's office window--the panel of the wall is plainly visible. It's supposed to be the "Los Angeles skyline" but it's obviously a piece of cardboard or something. Funny how the DOSSIER book always mentions how expensive M:I was yet none of that expense really translates to the screen. The almost constant filming on the Paramount lot, the use of the lumber warehouse and sets, etc. all look cheap. The expense must've been in the creation of the gadgets, I guess. I'm not complaining, mind you--just observing.

 
 Posted:   Apr 20, 2010 - 8:38 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

The DVD picture quality may be too good! At around the 9:23 mark, look at the right corner of Vochek's office window--the panel of the wall is plainly visible. It's supposed to be the "Los Angeles skyline" but it's obviously a piece of cardboard or something. Funny how the DOSSIER book always mentions how expensive M:I was yet none of that expense really translates to the screen. The almost constant filming on the Paramount lot, the use of the lumber warehouse and sets, etc. all look cheap. The expense must've been in the creation of the gadgets, I guess. I'm not complaining, mind you--just observing.

It's also been noted in the past how even when episodes are supposed to be taking place in New York, the MI budget never even allowed for some decent stock footage of NYC to open scenes and thus better "sell" the illusion.

 
 Posted:   Apr 20, 2010 - 9:45 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It's also been noted in the past how even when episodes are supposed to be taking place in New York, the MI budget never even allowed for some decent stock footage of NYC to open scenes and thus better "sell" the illusion.

Yes, I remember you pointing that out. I always disregarded the locale being anywhere except Los Angeles so it didn't matter where they said they were, which hurt all those Eastern Bloc nations where they were supposed to be! This time around, I just noticed the set deficiencies, something I never noticed before. Sort of the "strings above the spaceship" kind of thing.

 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2010 - 11:29 PM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

Just watched the last episode "Imitation." A nice guest villainess turn by Barbara McNair, which I guess accounts for why Lynda Day George was deemed expendable for the last one (EDIT-I err. This was shot much earlier in the season when Lynda was no doubt still on her maternity leave but held back to season's end). Not having a full team though kind of gives the effect of the show going out with a bit of a whimper (and the final shot just being of Barney rather than the team further underscored that).

 
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