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 Posted:   Jun 10, 2013 - 12:30 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

sOLIUM BE RIGHT ABOUT SUSPECTS in crime dramas!

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2013 - 6:46 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

No matter how hard or fast anyone runs, they never spend the next five minutes of screentime bent over and wheezing desperately for breath. A second-season episode of The Walking Dead was a rare exception.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2013 - 6:54 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

When a character is constantly cursing when in life you really think that character wouldn't curse that much.

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2013 - 7:38 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

No matter how hard or fast anyone runs, they never spend the next five minutes of screentime bent over and wheezing desperately for breath. A second-season episode of The Walking Dead was a rare exception.

Yeah, really wish they would show characters a little exhausted after some physical stress. The only time they do is when its for comic relief.

 
 Posted:   Jun 10, 2013 - 7:40 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Yeah Batman in those new super self-serious realism nolan movies never has to use the toilet and get out of his rubber suit.

Batdiapers? smile

 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2013 - 11:26 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

you see this alot on television shows to save money....

example: BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER
Buffy runs into the group of snotty teens who always make fun of her.
Cornelia(?)) makes some insulting remarks and all her friends smile, laugh and make gestures but NONE DARE TALK . iT IS REALLY ANNOYING THAT OUT OF A WHOLE GROUP OF PEOPLE ONLY ONE PERSON SAYS ANYTHING.!!!

[oF, COURSE , THIS IS DONE BECAUSE ANY SPEAKING PART HAS TO BE PAID scale!]

bruce

ps STAR TREK is another example - extras on the bridge never talk even if they are officers
in the middle of the action!

 
 Posted:   Jun 12, 2013 - 6:42 AM   
 By:   madmovyman   (Member)

when a character repeats a phrase to give a more emphatic meaning to the dialogue:

"I would like to dream, doctor. Do you think I will ever dream?"
"Yes, someday you will, Bobby... someday you will."

In most cases, this type of repetition just strikes me as stoopid.
But, in some rare circumstances, it works:

"Open the pod bay doors, Hal... open the pod bay doors."

 
 Posted:   Jun 12, 2013 - 7:21 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

when a character repeats a phrase to give a more emphatic meaning to the dialogue:

"I would like to dream, doctor. Do you think I will ever dream?"
"Yes, someday you will, Bobby... someday you will."

In most cases, this type of repetition just strikes me as stoopid.
But, in some rare circumstances, it works:

"Open the pod bay doors, Hal... open the pod bay doors."


Good point. In the first example it is redundant and actually spoofed a lot in comedies. In the second example, Bowmen (?) is assuming, Hal did not hear the command, so he repeats it.

 
 Posted:   Jun 12, 2013 - 12:48 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

when a character repeats a phrase to give a more emphatic meaning to the dialogue:

"I would like to dream, doctor. Do you think I will ever dream?"
"Yes, someday you will, Bobby... someday you will."

]


this one is so common that it has ceased to be something to hate - it just is something we accept!
brm

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2013 - 9:32 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I talk that way in life when I am making a strong point.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2013 - 11:14 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

I talk that way in life when I am making a strong point.

Do you really, Dan? Do you really? wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2013 - 1:50 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Women who want to break into an apartment/house always convince the landlord to let them in
by saying "i'm his girlfriend or "i'm locked out".
Even though she is a total stranger the landlord agrees - after first protesting that he can't do it 'cause "it's against regulations'

saw this in BOSS
brm

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2013 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

After seeing several early DR. WHO episodes, this occured to me:

....someone lands on a planet and when they encounter the inhabitans (usually only a HANDFUL, mind you), they are somehow representatives for the ENTIRE planet. Not just the area or the country, but the entire planet. This always bugged me. Surely, other civilized planets have found ways to organize themselves into areas or countries, at the very least?

 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2013 - 3:35 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Women who want to break into an apartment/house always convince the landlord to let them in
by saying "i'm his girlfriend or "i'm locked out".
Even though she is a total stranger the landlord agrees - after first protesting that he can't do it 'cause "it's against regulations'

saw this in BOSS
brm


Angela Lansbury did this all the time on MURDER SHE WROTE.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2013 - 3:42 PM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

After seeing several early DR. WHO episodes, this occured to me:

....someone lands on a planet and when they encounter the inhabitans (usually only a HANDFUL, mind you), they are somehow representatives for the ENTIRE planet. Not just the area or the country, but the entire planet. This always bugged me. Surely, other civilized planets have found ways to organize themselves into areas or countries, at the very least?


That's the same with every Star Trek I've seen. It seems that Earth is the only planet in the universe with hundreds of goverments...& hundreds of languages.

 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2013 - 5:40 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Women who want to break into an apartment/house always convince the landlord to let them in
by saying "i'm his girlfriend or "i'm locked out".
Even though she is a total stranger the landlord agrees - after first protesting that he can't do it 'cause "it's against regulations'

saw this in BOSS
brm


Angela Lansbury did this all the time on MURDER SHE WROTE.


well, it is hard to say no to an old broad

LOL!

 
 Posted:   Jun 23, 2013 - 1:52 PM   
 By:   madmovyman   (Member)

...when the death is too quick.

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2013 - 11:54 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

...when an actor well into his late fifties or early sixties has a son or daughter between the ages of 10-17 (witness Harrison Ford in Firewall). Who starts having kids around their fortieth birthday? Conversely, actresses who have yet to hit thirty with kids between 10-15 (witness Kate Bosworth in Superman Returns and Julia Stiles in the Omen remake). Pregnant at age twelve...?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2013 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

...when an actor well into his late fifties or early sixties has a son or daughter between the ages of 10-17 (witness Harrison Ford in Firewall). Who starts having kids around their fortieth birthday? Conversely, actresses who have yet to hit thirty with kids between 10-15 (witness Kate Bosworth in Superman Returns and Julia Stiles in the Omen remake). Pregnant at age twelve...?

David Letterman was, what, like 55 when he got his first kid?

 
 Posted:   Jun 24, 2013 - 8:20 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

David Letterman was, what, like 55 when he got his first kid?

Yes, but in general, it's kind of rare.

 
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