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This is a comments thread about Blog Post: Aisle Seat 1-15: It's a MAD MAD MAD MAD Blu-Ray by Andy Dursin
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 8:51 AM   
 By:   Bob Bryden   (Member)

I'm one of those 'Mad World' nostalgiaphiles! Saw it in the original Roadshow at the Odeon-Carlton Cinerama theatre in Toronto. What I'm really hoping for - is that the audio is punchy. All previous incarnations of the film on home video have a very tame (lame) audio track with no dynamic range whatsover so that Gold's music sounds oddly weak. That includes the VHS, laserdisc, DVD and previous blu-ray. I'm really hoping to hear this score as I did in the theatre - and as it should sound.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 11:37 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

If I may correct some misinformation in the review:

The original roadshow length, which Mr. Dursin calls 192 minutes, included the overture, entr'acte and exit music. Check. That version played for exactly one month and was then replaced by the shorter version that he's calling the "general release version" - but that was NOT, in fact, a general release version. About twenty-six minutes of actual picture was cut at that point, resulting in a film that ran about 164 minutes WITH the overture, entr'acte and exit music. That version was still the roadshow version (call it the second roadshow version) and it is, in fact, the version that most people saw, unless they saw the film in its first four weeks. That roadshow version played for a very long time, more than a year in some theaters.

When the roadshow was done and the film went into its general release THEN the overture, entr'acte and exit music was deleted resulting in the 154-minute running time of what has come to be known as the general release version.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 11:44 AM   
 By:   Eugene Iemola   (Member)

And neither does Jimmy Durante drive off an overpass or is the cast heading to Palm Springs to look for the Big W.

Durante drives his car off a cliff at a turn in the road, and the cast heads to the fictional Santa Rosita on the border with Mexico.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 11:50 AM   
 By:   joec   (Member)

If I may correct some misinformation in the review:

The original roadshow length, which Mr. Dursin calls 192 minutes, included the overture, entr'acte and exit music. Check. That version played for exactly one month and was then replaced by the shorter version that he's calling the "general release version" - but that was NOT, in fact, a general release version. About twenty-six minutes of actual picture was cut at that point, resulting in a film that ran about 164 minutes WITH the overture, entr'acte and exit music. That version was still the roadshow version (call it the second roadshow version) and it is, in fact, the version that most people saw, unless they saw the film in its first four weeks. That roadshow version played for a very long time, more than a year in some theaters.

When the roadshow was done and the film went into its general release THEN the overture, entr'acte and exit music was deleted resulting in the 154-minute running time of what has come to be known as the general release version.


You are right!
By the time I saw it it was 164 minutes.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 5:11 PM   
 By:   Great Escape   (Member)

If I may correct some misinformation in the review:

The original roadshow length, which Mr. Dursin calls 192 minutes, included the overture, entr'acte and exit music. Check. That version played for exactly one month and was then replaced by the shorter version that he's calling the "general release version" - but that was NOT, in fact, a general release version. About twenty-six minutes of actual picture was cut at that point, resulting in a film that ran about 164 minutes WITH the overture, entr'acte and exit music. That version was still the roadshow version (call it the second roadshow version) and it is, in fact, the version that most people saw, unless they saw the film in its first four weeks. That roadshow version played for a very long time, more than a year in some theaters.

When the roadshow was done and the film went into its general release THEN the overture, entr'acte and exit music was deleted resulting in the 154-minute running time of what has come to be known as the general release version.


Thanks for the clarification, Bruce.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 7:38 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

If I may correct some misinformation in the review:

The original roadshow length, which Mr. Dursin calls 192 minutes, included the overture, entr'acte and exit music. Check. That version played for exactly one month and was then replaced by the shorter version that he's calling the "general release version" - but that was NOT, in fact, a general release version. About twenty-six minutes of actual picture was cut at that point, resulting in a film that ran about 164 minutes WITH the overture, entr'acte and exit music. That version was still the roadshow version (call it the second roadshow version) and it is, in fact, the version that most people saw, unless they saw the film in its first four weeks. That roadshow version played for a very long time, more than a year in some theaters.

When the roadshow was done and the film went into its general release THEN the overture, entr'acte and exit music was deleted resulting in the 154-minute running time of what has come to be known as the general release version.


Thanks for the clarification, Bruce.


You're welcome. Wouldn't it be nice if Mr. Dursin would correct his review, because that is how this misinformation keeps perpetuating itself. Will he? Let's see.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 7:41 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Oh, and one OTHER thing: The cuts were not made to allow for more showings during the roadshow run. It never had more showings.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 7:57 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....Oh, and one OTHER thing: The cuts were not made to allow for more showings during the roadshow run. It never had more showings.....


Then is it true that audiences were laughing so hard they were peeing their pants, and so Kramer cut the film to allow them to get to the restrooms sooner?

Or was I misinformed? smile smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 9:15 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

.....Oh, and one OTHER thing: The cuts were not made to allow for more showings during the roadshow run. It never had more showings.....


Then is it true that audiences were laughing so hard they were peeing their pants, and so Kramer cut the film to allow them to get to the restrooms sooner?

Or was I misinformed? smile smile


Hey did I miss your party again? smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 11:19 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Oh, and one OTHER thing: The cuts were not made to allow for more showings during the roadshow run. It never had more showings.


This is constantly given as the primary reason (or at least one of the reasons) why roadshows are cut when the general release version is issued. Yet no one has ever offered a satisfactory explanation as to how cutting 20 or 30 minutes from a 150 or 180 minute film can increase the number of shows per day by even one.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 1:54 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

I only saw this on general release (in London), so the 154 minute version in fine with me, & the multi-region MGM Blu-ray looks stunning. I'm happy for the people who want the long version, & I really hope it does well. Esp. as if it does, MGM might take a look at The Alamo, or give it to Criterion & Robert Harris for a restoration.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 8:40 AM   
 By:   AndyDursin   (Member)

If I may correct some misinformation in the review:

The original roadshow length, which Mr. Dursin calls 192 minutes, included the overture, entr'acte and exit music. Check. That version played for exactly one month and was then replaced by the shorter version that he's calling the "general release version" - but that was NOT, in fact, a general release version. About twenty-six minutes of actual picture was cut at that point, resulting in a film that ran about 164 minutes WITH the overture, entr'acte and exit music. That version was still the roadshow version (call it the second roadshow version) and it is, in fact, the version that most people saw, unless they saw the film in its first four weeks. That roadshow version played for a very long time, more than a year in some theaters.

When the roadshow was done and the film went into its general release THEN the overture, entr'acte and exit music was deleted resulting in the 154-minute running time of what has come to be known as the general release version.


Someone needs to make a road map of the different versions!

I would be happy to make corrections. I was only going by what I have read elsewhere as I was not alive in the '60s to know smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 8:41 AM   
 By:   AndyDursin   (Member)

You're welcome. Wouldn't it be nice if Mr. Dursin would correct his review, because that is how this misinformation keeps perpetuating itself. Will he? Let's see.

A note via email would also get it fixed faster too, btw. I don't always check the board here.

But I defer to you guys, I wasn't alive back then, only going by the apparent misinformation that's been circulating. Apologies!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 8:53 AM   
 By:   AndyDursin   (Member)

I think I have it right now.

To clarify, the Criterion also includes the shorter Roadshow 163-min. version -- NOT the 154 min. general release version (which is on the prior MGM Blu-Ray). The only difference between those two being the inclusion of the Overture/Intermission/Exit Music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 9:28 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

I think I have it right now.

To clarify, the Criterion also includes the shorter Roadshow 163-min. version -- NOT the 154 min. general release version (which is on the prior MGM Blu-Ray). The only difference between those two being the inclusion of the Overture/Intermission/Exit Music.


Not quite!! The MGM Blu-ray was also the 163 minute roadshow version because it included the Overture/Intermission/Exit Music. Incidentally the UK, and probably the rest of Europe, included the intermission for the general release version; as was usual when roadshow films went on general release.

Sadly I was a bit late seeing the film in Cinerama in London; a few months after it opened, and only got to see the abridged roadshow version - although I'm not sure whether the initial longer roadshow version was ever shown there.

THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD was another roadshow film cut soon after it's US opening. I saw it in London a day after it opened - and it had already been cut.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   AndyDursin   (Member)

I think I have it right now.

To clarify, the Criterion also includes the shorter Roadshow 163-min. version -- NOT the 154 min. general release version (which is on the prior MGM Blu-Ray). The only difference between those two being the inclusion of the Overture/Intermission/Exit Music.


Not quite!! The MGM Blu-ray was also the 163 minute roadshow version because it included the Overture/Intermission/Exit Music. Incidentally the UK, and probably the rest of Europe, included the intermission for the general release version; as was usual when roadshow films went on general release.


Ah, ok! Got it confused with MGMHD channel's airings, which definitely don't have the Overture etc. on there.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 10:45 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I think I have it right now.

To clarify, the Criterion also includes the shorter Roadshow 163-min. version -- NOT the 154 min. general release version (which is on the prior MGM Blu-Ray). The only difference between those two being the inclusion of the Overture/Intermission/Exit Music.


Haven't gotten the Criterion yet - it's on its way, but if the shorter version includes the overture, entr'acte and exit music, then it's the second roadshow version - again, that's what 99% of the audiences back in the day saw. The 154 version is, as you say, exactly the same sans the overture, entr'acte and exit music.

What confused everything is the laserdisc, which wasn't anything that had ever been released. And then people started seeing the running time of some preview version that was also never released, and then some people started adding the intermission police calls to the running time, which confused people even more. Robert Harris has the original timing sheets for the uncut roadshow (the one that played four weeks only) and has printed them at the HTF.

Andy, I did e-mail you through the link.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 11:36 AM   
 By:   AndyDursin   (Member)

Thanks Bruce, I appreciate it. I do not often check the board.

I had forgotten the MGM Blu-Ray was 163 mins. (I had confused it with the MGM HD channel airings which omit the Overture music), so that presentation is reprieved here on the 1st disc of the Criterion for all intents and purposes.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 12:53 PM   
 By:   itstownerman   (Member)

Today...Who would sit through this over produced, over directed, bloated hot mess. Stanley Kramer put all of Hollywood in this film. I don't think I have ever seen that monster of 197 minutes of mess. I would be 100% scared if I had to sit in a movie house and watch 197 minutes of Mad World. While Ernest Gold's score is excellent..and catchy..but used way too much. The movie is about..someone having way too much times on their hands and wants the ultimate car, air, foot, chase sequences. This is when Stanley Kramer needed a "NO" Man next to him..when filming and editing! Bloated.

info:

The film ran 210 minutes in its preview showing. Kramer cut the film to 192 minutes for the premiere release. During its roadshow 70mm run, United Artists, seeing that it had a mammoth hit on its hands, cut the film to 161 minutes without Kramer's involvement in order to add an extra daily showing. The general release 35mm version runs 154 minutes, with overture and exit music excised. At the film's premiere, radio transmissions between the film's fictional police played in the theater lobby and rest rooms during the intermission. The police transmissions featured Detective Matthews (Charles McGraw) and the police personnel that follow the group. These three reports (each approx. one minute in length) may have added to the 210-minute length.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

Today...Who would sit through this over produced, over directed, bloated hot mess. Stanley Kramer put all of Hollywood in this film. I don't think I have ever seen that monster of 197 minutes of mess. I would be 100% scared if I had to sit in a movie house and watch 197 minutes of Mad World. While Ernest Gold's score is excellent..and catchy..but used way too much. The movie is about..someone having way too much times on their hands and wants the ultimate car, air, foot, chase sequences. This is when Stanley Kramer needed a "NO" Man next to him..when filming and editing! Bloated.

info:


Honestly, it is a devisive movie. One man's bloat (in this case) is another man's delight. I like the film and I'm looking forward to this new blu-ray.

Greg Espinoza

 
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