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 Posted:   Mar 13, 2014 - 7:52 AM   
 By:   Jim Doherty   (Member)

Regarding the Brunswick 45, while I can't vouch for the particular 45 magoptic mentions, I CAN point out that there were indeed several recordings put by The Victor Young Singing Strings conducted by Alfred Newman, such as The Purple Hills from RUN OF THE ARROW, and Tell My Love from OMAR KHAYYAM. Perhaps these were done after Young's death?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 13, 2014 - 7:55 AM   
 By:   Jim Doherty   (Member)

Incidentally, there's a lot of good Victor Young stuff up on ebay at the moment, including the rather rare MUSICAL SKETCHBOOK (one copy is going for only $1.00).

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 13, 2014 - 5:33 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)


I think I have a rare Victor Young 45 rpm on Decca.

One side is "To Love You" from "The Proud and the Profane" comp. & cond. by Young.

Other side is "Never-Come Sunday" comp. & cond. by Young.

Have these ever been on an LP? I never saw them on an LP.

"The Proud and the Profane" is beautiful ..... Bruce, hint, hint! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 2:47 PM   
 By:   magoptic   (Member)

Regarding the Brunswick 45, while I can't vouch for the particular 45 magoptic mentions, I CAN point out that there were indeed several recordings put by The Victor Young Singing Strings conducted by Alfred Newman, such as The Purple Hills from RUN OF THE ARROW, and Tell My Love from OMAR KHAYYAM. Perhaps these were done after Young's death?

I may have got it wrong about the Brunswick & I can't immediately spot the disc to check. I do have the one you've mentioned here & certainly says 'conducted by Alfred Newman.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 8:51 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)


Am I the only person who has the Decca 45 rpm of "The Proud and the Profane" composed and conducted by Victor Young? I have never seen it on an LP.

I hope Bruce will issue "The Proud and the Profane" on a future CD if possible.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2014 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   andrewprets   (Member)

Does anyone know if this Decca "soundtrack" album is really from the soundtrack? The album cover reads "music from the soundtrack" - which doesn't necessarily mean it's the original soundtrack recording. At the bottom, it says "recorded by the Munich Symphony Orchestra" - which is a little odd. And there is no credit anywhere for the conductor.

 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2014 - 4:33 PM   
 By:   Recordman   (Member)

See my comments on "Tone Poems..." at http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=100202&forumID=1&archive=0



Magoptic: I have the TONE POEMS CD.

PFK: I too always wondered about Sinatra conducting. Although, there is also a Dean Martin album called "Sleep Warm," on which Sinatra also supposedly conducts. Who knows?


Jim, in 1971 I found this LP in a small, very old record store in Rhode Island. The owner was in his 60s and in the music business over 40 years! When I went to pay him for the LP, he took one look at it and said:
" Frank Sinatra no more conducted this than I did!" ...... smile

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2014 - 11:47 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Does anyone know if this Decca "soundtrack" album is really from the soundtrack? The album cover reads "music from the soundtrack" - which doesn't necessarily mean it's the original soundtrack recording. At the bottom, it says "recorded by the Munich Symphony Orchestra" - which is a little odd. And there is no credit anywhere for the conductor.


Studio press materials for THE BRAVE ONE note that in conjunction with the film’s release, Decca Records produced an album of music “taken directly from the soundtrack.”

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2014 - 12:38 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

Does anyone know if this Decca "soundtrack" album is really from the soundtrack? The album cover reads "music from the soundtrack" - which doesn't necessarily mean it's the original soundtrack recording. At the bottom, it says "recorded by the Munich Symphony Orchestra" - which is a little odd. And there is no credit anywhere for the conductor.

By the 1950s and into the 1960s, I believe the King Brothers, producers of THE BRAVE ONE, were operating out of Germany. So it makes sense that the Munich Symphony Orchestra likely did record the score.

Isn't the "Munich Symphony Orchestra" actually the Graunke Symphony Orchestra, and if so, is it likely Kurt Graunke conducted the score?

And isn't it likely that the reason there IS a Decca soundtrack album for this film in 1956 at all is because, since it was recorded in Germany, there were probably no union re-use fees for the LP?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2014 - 1:22 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

I came across this passage, the concluding paragraph of a short article entitled "Confessions of a Film Composer," written by Victor Young himself for a publication called Music Journal. The article was reprinted in the Winter 1956 issue of Film and TV Music.

"By and large, Hollywood producers will come to intelligent terms with a composer's judgement, after considerable discussion. But it is always most productive to be given a completely free hand in one's work. I was delighted when the King Brothers recently turned over their fine film, The Brave One, to me, and simply said 'It's your baby now.' Set in Mexico, The Brave One gave me time and leeway to work in the Latin folk-idiom, which I'm particularly partial to. For the actual recording I was able to use the excellent 110-piece Munich Symphony Orchestra. The result is a film composition I find deeply satisfying, and one that I hope will enhance the pleasure of audiences everywhere."

 
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