Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2014 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Gustavo Dudamel, music director of our Los Angeles Philharmonic (we call him "The Dude") has scored his first film THE LIBERATOR. NOW he is into film music and is doing his first film music concert at the Hollywood Bowl with Thomas Newman's ANGELS IN AMERICA, Gustavo Santaolalla's MOTORCYCLE DIARIES, Bear McCreary's BATTLESTAR GALLACTICA and quite a few other scores, as well as his own.

http://www.hollywoodbowl.com/tickets/americas-amp-americans-festival-noche-de-cine/2014-07-31

Now one week before that He, Santaolalla and John Williams will have a talk at LACMA's Bing Theater via the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences:

http://www.oscars.org/press/pressreleases/2014/20140627.html

Since Dudamel already announced opening night of the new Phil Season will be a John Williams night, all tolled this will be the most encounters I will have had with Williams within a single year that I ever can remember (and there have been a lot!) Nice to be in his hometown.

 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2014 - 6:42 PM   
 By:   drivingmissdaisy   (Member)

We just ordered our tickets to the July 31st concert, WOO HOOO.

Can't wait to hear Bear's music live and to hear one of my favorite Thomas Newman scores, Angels in America LIVE. I sure did pick the right year to move out here!

The Oscar link isn't working for some reason, Henry.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2014 - 8:11 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Let me say first that at the beginning of the program it was a relief to see that the whole panel deferred to Mr. Williams as the master of the subject of the night - film music. This resulted in the lopsidedness of the panel becoming neutralized. Then something happened that really surprised me that made this night one of the best for me ever.

When Tavis Smiley started as a talk show host on PBS around ten years ago I gave him 6 months at most. What I didn't pick up on was his relative inarticulateness almost became an asset. Since he would be talking to every type of person on the planet he had to find a common ground to speak to everyone from religious leaders, scientists, heads of state and major artists. He has done this by slicing through to the issues most concerning whoever he is talking to, while at the same time creating a homey livingroom atmosphere. What he got out of Williams and everyone else was amazing! I learned more new about Williams tonight than practically any interview I can remember.

Look at just a few clips:

http://www.oscars.org/events/behind-score/index.html

 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2014 - 12:20 AM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Look at just a few clips:

http://www.oscars.org/events/behind-score/index.html


Wonderful stuff. I was especially impressed by Mr. Santaolalla's question to John about "Jaws" -- some beautiful insights there, and a terrific answer, too. Thanks for posting this. I envy you, monsieur Morricone (it was sold out long before I heard about the event). Very glad to see this was all recorded.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2014 - 10:33 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

The film clips were unusual too! I don't know if they discussed it between themselves, but it seemed to me 3 absolutely different approaches to each theme. The most talked about were Morricone's THE MISSION and William's JAWS. The themes they were given were for mood, suspense and evocation and here were the choices by composer in that order:

Gustavo Dudamel:
MELANCHOLIA Richard Wagner (from Tristan & Isolde)
THE MISSION Ennio Morricone
AMERICAN BEAUTY Thomas Newman

Gustavo Santaolalla:
PARIS TEXAS Ry Cooder
JAWS John Williams
ELEVATOR TO THE GALLOWS

John Williams:
CHINATOWN Jerry Goldsmith
VERTIGO Bernard Herrmann
BRAVEHEART James Horner

 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2014 - 11:25 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Wow, Braveheart. It's funny to think about Williams being into that at all, for some reason. What clip did they show?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2014 - 1:10 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Wow, Braveheart. It's funny to think about Williams being into that at all, for some reason. What clip did they show?

The finale right up to THE END.

What is cool about these Academy events they sort of create an even playing field. At the nominee concert all composers were given the same set of questions. Basically establishing that the job is the same for all, how it is accomplished is the thing that varies.

I personally love the well trained composer simply because they have a lot more to choose from in their arsenal. They tend to give me a lot more. Williams pointed out what an unusual choice the trumpet was for CHINATOWN, but because of it Goldsmith establishes, before one image is even shown, what the entire film is about (John chose simply the main titles). A sophisticated approach to something very simple. And yet the opening titles to PARIS, TEXAS by Ry Cooder or the rousing orchestral crescendo to BRAVEHEART by James Horner is a more direct approach yet just as effective. You get a sense you can get there from many different ways.

 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2014 - 1:16 PM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Wow, Braveheart. It's funny to think about Williams being into that at all, for some reason. What clip did they show?

The finale right up to THE END.



That's great.

 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2014 - 10:04 PM   
 By:   Scott Bettencourt   (Member)

The most interesting moment was near the very end, when Williams (I can only assume alluding to the sudden death of his first wife, actress Barbara Ruick) referred to a personal tragedy forty years ago that completely changed the way he approached his music. She passed on during the making of California Split in 1974, the year before he scored Jaws.

 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2014 - 10:16 PM   
 By:   Scott Bettencourt   (Member)

I was really shocked that Williams selected Braveheart as one of his clips.

It's cool that he chose a younger composer (along with elder statesman Herrmann and peer Goldsmith), but -- not to start a flame war here, Horner is a very talented musical dramatist and has written some scores I absolutely love -- it's ironic that he chose one who has himself never seemed to acknowledge how other film composers have informed his work.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 2:02 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

God, how I would have loved to attend this. I hope a full video of the session will be released at some point.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 9:13 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

God, how I would have loved to attend this. I hope a full video of the session will be released at some point.

This unexpectedly was one of the best Williams interviews I've seen or read. It helped that the other two composers idolized and yet were bold enough to ask him questions.

One exchange that I don't think is on this tape is when Tavis asked (paraphrasing) "Okay, between you and me Mr. Williams. Has there come a time when you were given an assignment and said to yourself, there is nothing I can do. My music cannot make this into a good movie." And after a minute of laughter from all of us, including Williams, who seemed to be searching for a tactful way to answer this, he replied with the shortest answer of the night. "Yes." Which got us all laughing uncontrollably again (maybe you had to be there).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 9:17 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Nice.

I don't particularly like the 'idolizing' bit you speak of (this always feels a bit awkward to me and most Norwegians), but if he got some unusual questions, that's great.

 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

"Has there come a time when you were given an assignment and said to yourself, there is nothing I can do. My music cannot make this into a good movie." And after a minute of laughter from all of us, including Williams, who seemed to be searching for a tactful way to answer this, he replied with the shortest answer of the night. "Yes."

 
 Posted:   Jul 24, 2014 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   Scott Bettencourt   (Member)

I was thinking more of the later films that he was at one point announced for or involved with but ultimately didn't score (The Sentinel, Heaven's Gate, Meteor, Inchon, Wolf, Bicentennial Man).

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.