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 Posted:   Jul 13, 2014 - 12:27 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

My jaw dropped when I saw this segment from the 1963 Oscar Show. Talk about an 'OOPS' moment!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2014 - 1:00 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

As Bing said to Frank in HIGH SOCIETY, "You must be one of the newer fellas." I'm old enough to recall that moment when it first happened; in fact, I've never forgotten it. It must be one of the most memorable laughs in the history of the Oscars. Thanks, Montana, for letting me enjoy it again.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2014 - 1:24 PM   
 By:   Doc Loch   (Member)

So is this the only time this has happened in the history of the Oscars? (I don't mean Addison winning, I mean getting the wrong envelope.)

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2014 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   Heath   (Member)

Sammy Davis played it well though. But the real oops moment was "Alec North" not winning for Cleopatra, likewise Alex North. wink

However, to give it its due, Addison's innovative score was quite epoch making - it seemed to usher in the trend for using harpsichords (later the electric harpsichord) in film music that persisted throughout the 60s and into the 70s. Ironically, North used a harpsichord in Cleopatra too, but subtly within the orchestral textures. Addison put his up front and loud.

Subtly never gets you the big prize in showbiz. big grin

BTW, nice to see Elmer looking cool and young!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2014 - 7:20 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Sammy Davis played it well though. But the real oops moment was "Alec North" not winning for Cleopatra, likewise Alex North. wink

However, to give it its due, Addison's innovative score was quite epoch making - it seemed to usher in the trend for using harpsichords (later the electric harpsichord) in film music that persisted throughout the 60s and into the 70s. Ironically, North used a harpsichord in Cleopatra too, but subtly within the orchestral textures. Addison put his up front and loud.

Subtly never gets you the big prize in showbiz. big grin

BTW, nice to see Elmer looking cool and young!



If you look behind Andre Previn as he rises from his seat, you can see Alex North seated behind him. It must have been a dreadful feeling to have to sit there and realize the outcome even before the announcement.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2014 - 7:26 AM   
 By:   mrchriswell   (Member)

Whatever happened to Maurice Jarrard?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2014 - 8:06 AM   
 By:   Paul Schroeder   (Member)

I watched this telecast live back in 1964 and well remember Elmer accepting the Best Score Oscar on behalf of the absent John Addison. My feeling then and to this day is that Elmer should have been accepting his own Oscar for THE GREAT ESCAPE -- not even nominated. The film was unjustly ignored by the Academy with only a single nomination for Best Film Editing.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2014 - 8:36 AM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

Wonderful stuff.

My Lord, CLEOPATRA and HOW THE WEST WAS WON lost?

Also, freeze it at 3:01 and that definitely looks like the Alfred Newman haircut to the right of where Andre's walking. All the composers sitting together.

Sammy was so cool!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2014 - 12:30 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Dear Zooba --

Yes, they both lost, and of course there was no way they both could win. Perhaps you had the same feeling I got when listening to those 5 nominations: What an embarrassment of riches in those days! (I hope you don't begrudge Mr. Addison his win.)

***

Dear Paul --

Maybe we should form a Codger's Club for those of us who remember that original broadcast?

I hadn't realized how little recognition the Academy accorded THE GREAT ESCAPE, but sadly I'm not surprised; it's so typical of that organization. A few years ago, at an American Cinematheque screening of THE GREAT ESCAPE here in L.A., the fellow introducing the film declared that for him it wasn't CITIZEN KANE that was the best movie ever, it was THE GREAT ESCAPE.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2014 - 12:53 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Another world, another time, that remark made by Davis was cool. Yet it is fascinating[no politics here,] but a simple observation of life then and now. On cable the other night in that same era THEY SHOWED the 1965 all star game. Maybe young people will learn something they didn't realize, The starting lineup in both leagues came to about 75% African Americans. Just an observation.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2014 - 9:23 AM   
 By:   mrchriswell   (Member)

Not fair of course but a little sad that Previn lacked the wit to ad lib something there. But we can't all be Randy Newman.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2014 - 11:22 AM   
 By:   Doctor Shatterhand   (Member)

Thanks for posting this. I was 3 years old so I never knew about this until now. Great stuff.

Although there really can only be one winner, the scores back then are so memorable that anything done today is pale in comparison. These composers and their nominated themes as well as those who did not get nominated were at the pinnacle of great music during the 1960s.

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2014 - 11:23 AM   
 By:   Doctor Shatterhand   (Member)

This was also just months after the assassination of JFK and a short time before the signing of the Civil Rights Bill.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2014 - 12:24 PM   
 By:   Mike_H   (Member)

Haha terrific! We could shave off an hour if they just came out and announced the winners wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2014 - 12:27 PM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

Of course congratulations to John Addison. Obviously the majority of the voters that year felt he did the Best Score and thus he was voted winner.

I had always wondered about that photo of Sammy with Bernstein and Previn and now I know the story behind it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2014 - 3:47 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)


The man who handed Sammy Davis the wrong envelope was Bill Miller of Price-Waterhouse

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2014 - 3:53 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

The man who handed Sammy Davis the wrong envelope was Bill Miller of Price-Waterhouse



So ..... whatever happened to Bill Miller? smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2014 - 6:26 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

The man who handed Sammy Davis the wrong envelope was Bill Miller of Price-Waterhouse



So ..... whatever happened to Bill Miller? smile


He was still handing out those envelopes personally, at least through 1968. I wonder what you have to do to get fired from that job?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2014 - 6:30 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

To err is human , make a habit of it, out you go.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 16, 2014 - 6:34 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)


Now that we've seen Sammy Davis Jr. do his Edward G Robinson impersonation in the video at the first post; and Jack Lemmon tells Sammy that Edward G. Robinson is 'due out next'. Well, he does indeed come out next. What's amusing is that when Mr. Robinson is handed his first envelope to open, you can see him studying the writing on the front of it first..and in detail, to be sure it doesn't happen again! Also, if you stick around for the second envelope to be opened, you get to hear some of Alfred Newman's music to 'How The West Was Won', played by the orchestra.

 
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