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 Posted:   Jul 26, 2014 - 6:43 AM   
 By:   daretodream   (Member)

And he did...triumphantly so.

Someone once disagreed and said what Goldenthal did to Tyler was appalling. People really have no idea how the industry works. What was so appalling about that I will understand.

As for temp-tracks, I agree with Elmer Bernstein who said, and I quote:

'I think that people who make temp-tracks should be shot! The temp-track is a vile and disgusting habit, which absolutely robs the composer of originality.'

He then continued and said something like that he refuses to listen to temp scores, unless the film has been temped with music of his. Otherwise he won't even listen to temp score.

I completely agree but, what I find interesting is that every and each of films that Goldenthal worked in the past had been temped --more or less-- with his music.

What I don't understand is why he got SO furious when Taymor (his partner and collaborator) did the same on TITUS. Although Taymor promised that it was the first and last time she used temp-track, it clearly wasn't.

Any ideas?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2014 - 6:50 AM   
 By:   Smaug   (Member)

I don't understand what you are saying? What did Goldenthal do to Bates?! Bates plagiarized. End of story. Whether he was forced into it or not doesn't matter. He put his name on it. The Titus music was owned by Warner Bros. and if they wanted that music they could have licensed it for not much, like $50k.

The 300 makers knew they were doing wrong. Bates had a chance to do the right thing and he didn't so it's a black mark on his record.

Comparing it to Taymor using a temp on Titus is not at all the same thing. She used that bit from A Time to Kill in the final picture and licensed it. It says very clearly "from "A time to Kill".

There's probably a temp track discussion here somewhere. But this is a special case of plagiarim and to say what Goldenthal did in the aftermath is wrong is a joke. He got ripped off and said something. Is that wrong? After doing something like 12 WB movies he was never hired again by them. He paid a price. But he did what was right. Whereas Bates did something wrong but didn't rock the boat and played by club rules and he's been rewarded.

It's a dirty industry.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 2:00 PM   
 By:   daretodream   (Member)

No, that's not what I meant, Smaug. I was just quoting someone who works in this industry and also happens to be a friend of Tyler Bates. He didn't elaborate on that, which left me wondering. What I merely know is that the man copied --without giving any credit to Goldenthal -- fragments from TITUS score. Every composer's worst nightmare is that he is unconsciously re-writing someone else's music that he has heard previously, but this was obviously not the case. End of story.

As for Warner Bros. not ever hiring him again, I'd say their loss.

Regarding temp-track on Titus. I never understood why maestro was so pissed off about Taymor temp scoring the film with his own music. Like I said before each and every film that he worked on prior TITUS, had been temped with his own music. Why he got so furious (as the director later explained) when she did it?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 6:48 PM   
 By:   Smaug   (Member)

He talked about the problem for him of dealing with temp tracks before the premiere of Symphony in May. He said the worst thing that ever happened was that time Taymor did that. He said "she took the best stuff he had ever lucked into" and basically said "do that." He said she thought she was doing him a favor. He was talking to a classical crowd and he talked about other times when people put a temp track in of things like Mendelssohn's Reformation Symphony and say to him "do something like that. (Create a masterpiece).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2014 - 1:35 AM   
 By:   daretodream   (Member)

Yes, I remember him saying something like 'How do you think I am ever gonna better myself? It's possible.' Then he's either repeating himself, but 'he can't do better than that'.

An important question is why he has abandoned film music medium or sort of. I think it was after SWAT when he shall we say 'retired' from film music? I know he was never considered as film composer per se, but he was active scoring films back in the 90s. Any particular reason why?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2014 - 4:02 AM   
 By:   McMillan & Husband   (Member)

An important question is why he has abandoned film music medium or sort of. I think it was after SWAT when he shall we say 'retired' from film music? I know he was never considered as film composer per se, but he was active scoring films back in the 90s. Any particular reason why?

Well initially, he took time off from film scoring to work on his opera Grendel, and then he suffered a rather life threatening bump on the noggin which put him out of commission for a while.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2014 - 4:45 PM   
 By:   Smaug   (Member)

Well the opera was 2006-during which time he relearned how to talk, though his ability to compose music went I effected. Since then, maybe 2006-2010. During that time he had three credits: The Tempest, Across the Universe (underscore and arrangements), and Public Enemies. No concert works.

However, in 2012 he used that big Krakow FMF Festival to make concert versions of his film scores.
2013 composed his first string quartet and wrote the music for the stage version of A Midsummer Night's Dream. 2014 released two albums and premiered his first Symphony in May. Premiered the concert treatment of his Batman music at Tenerife (Grand Gothic Suite) in July. Currently finishing the score for the film of the stage version of A Midsummer Night's Dream. He's got two concerts in the fall (Prague Film Music Fest & Krakow). And it appears he switched agents to Kraft Engel. The guys's cruisin'...on top of everything his speech seems much improved...

 
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