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 Posted:   Dec 19, 2010 - 3:26 PM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Hard to believe that it's nearly 20 years since we lost Miles. Here's one of my favorite tracks with great work by John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley and Bill Evans.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2010 - 3:39 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Man, I don't even know where to begin with the Prince of Darkness. Miles is pure Black magic. From Kind of Blue to Bitches Brew and beyond, I just can't get enough. He's got a signature "voice" that is always unmistakably Miles, often imitated but never duplicated. Ok, I've run out of clichés. big grin

Seriously, though, Miles rules. Here's one of my favorite tracks by his 60s quintet, featuring (for those who don't already know) Miles Davis (trumpet), Wayne Shorter (sax), Herbie Hancock (piano), Ron Carter (bass), and Tony Williams (drums). This is especially lovely on a dark and rainy day like today:

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2010 - 3:47 PM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

Kind of Blue and Sketches of Spain are two of the great albums (of any kind) of all time. Pure magic.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2010 - 4:16 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Kind of Blue and Sketches of Spain are two of the great albums (of any kind) of all time. Pure magic.


Same here, all coming from a one of kind musician, who worked with a one of a kind arranger (Gil Evans).

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2010 - 6:31 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I've been a Miles fan for about twenty years now. However, it took me some time--fifteen years--to finally appreciate the 1965-68 Second Great Quintet. I loved much of Miles Davis' musical output, but I never liked the 1965-68 Quintet that featured Wayne, Herbie, Ron, and Tony (yes, I'm on a first-name basis with these guys) as I did the other work in Miles' career. I loved these musicians in their separate realms, but not in Miles' group. My common view of the group was that Miles was just making noise, Tony only seemed to play the cymbals and nothing else, and Wayne was doing his worst Coltrane impression(!).

That was then.

Three years ago, I dug out my long-neglected copies of E.S.P.; Sorcerer; and Miles Smiles and for whatever reason, I finally "got" them! The music didn't sound cold and distant as I used to believe, the playing of all five men was fiery, magical, and at the same time I started thinking of the wondrous music they made as "Space Jazz", with that floating, lilting quality it had. It was both fiery and reflective. Everything sounded "right", and it only took fifteen years for me to realize it! I'm embarassed but thrilled that I've finally come around to Miles, circa 1965.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2010 - 7:04 PM   
 By:   Holly Mitchell   (Member)

One of my favourite albums...




Along with the "Jack Johnson" score:

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2010 - 2:15 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I adore his very first period:
"Birth of The Cool" (1949)
"Milestones" (1958)

 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2010 - 3:14 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

'Sketches of Spain' is a joy.

Anybody mention 'Sssh, Peaceful' yet?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2010 - 12:33 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I keep coming back to the 1960s quintet.

Miles is an interesting figure in jazz. While most of the great jazz musicians are known for being either amazing players or writers, Miles's talents were in the realm of conceptualizing new approaches to jazz and facilitating great group sounds.

 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2010 - 12:36 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Miles's talents were in the realm of conceptualizing new approaches to jazz and facilitating great group sounds.

He was a heckuva talent scount, too.

 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2010 - 2:46 PM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Just love this track from the Porgy and Bess album. I always feel a little better after listening to it.

 
 Posted:   Jan 14, 2011 - 7:42 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Miles Davis with John Coltrane- "Teo" (1961)

 
 Posted:   Jan 14, 2011 - 9:59 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

OK, a Miles Davis contribution most of you probably haven't heard, playing trumpet on the 1988 Scritti Politti pop classic Oh Patti (starting at 2:53):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbakJYhHSkk

And the Øystein Sevåg/Nils Petter Molvær tribute Miles Away, written after he had died. Exquisite:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtPUHCwNPaw

 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2011 - 4:25 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

OK, a Miles Davis contribution most of you probably haven't heard, playing trumpet on the 1988 Scritti Politti pop classic Oh Patti (starting at 2:53):


I don't think I'd ever heard a "Scritti Politti" song until this clip. They were only a name to me in the '80s. And could the instrumentation outside of Miles' trumpet be any more 1980s-sounding? wink

BTW, Miles playing on this doesn't surprise me--didn't know he even did--but during the '80s he covered Michael Jackson's "Human Nature" and Cyndi Lauper's "Time After Time", to much controversy, of course. cool

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2011 - 6:05 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

And could the instrumentation outside of Miles' trumpet be any more 1980s-sounding? wink

I guess not. It's very digital and slick, just the way I like it. ;-)

And it's a good memory from the late 80s for me.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2011 - 6:17 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

And could the instrumentation outside of Miles' trumpet be any more 1980s-sounding? wink

I guess not. It's very digital and slick, just the way I like it. ;-)

And it's a good memory from the late 80s for me.


No problem. smile

Miles lasted long enough and was innovative for a prolonged period of time that he's bound to impress several generations with his various styles. He wasn't called "The Picasso of Jazz" for nothing.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2011 - 9:24 AM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Here's one of my favorite tracks by his 60s quintet...

Josh, did you ever notice echoes of Nefertiti in this? (see below)



I always wondered if John Williams was a fan, or if this was a coincidence? I love the crossover of jazz with modern orchestral music, and find that musical dialog thrilling. For instance, Wayne Shorter is a fan of JW and quoted Jurassic Park in his Footprints Live album, released in 2002.

I love Miles! I think if I was forced to pick a desert island favorite, mine would be In A Silent Way, but there's such a range of styles I'm still discovering him after first hearing Kind of Blue in my youth. That's another favorite, along with Bitches Brew, Miles Smiles and his score for Elevator to the Gallows. I recently enjoyed Mike Dibb's 2001 documentary The Miles Davis Story for a view into Miles' cantankerous personality and his relationships with friends and family.

He was one of the greats.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2011 - 9:50 AM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Here's one of my favorite tracks by his 60s quintet...

Josh, did you ever notice echoes of Nefertiti in this? (see below)


Wow, I never noticed that before. Definitely some similarities in the melody. Great ear.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2011 - 6:10 PM   
 By:   Holly Mitchell   (Member)

Now Playing:

 
 Posted:   Jan 17, 2011 - 12:48 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

I do like his autobiography too. Here's the cover of the edition I own:

 
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