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 Posted:   Feb 17, 2011 - 10:49 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

THE ROVER
L'avventuriero
Haunting Morricone
#34



This series is inspired by a controversy thread where someone posited the idea that besides THE MISSION and some Sergio Leone westerns Ennio Morricone hasn't written anything great. Rather than making my usual comment that most of Morricone's great scores are from Italy and trying to get Americans to listen to them is like getting them to see movies with subtitles, I decided to take another tact. Since I am at an age where I will only be able to make my case a finite number of times I decided to turn this into a series presenting each great score one at a time, sort of like recordman.

Haunting to the point of deja-vu would be more accurate. This heavily Italian co-production was directed by Terence Young who was James Bond. I know John Barry was James Bond, but anyone who knew Terence Young, his personality and his lifestyle knew that everything about James Bond in the film versions of DR. NO, FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE and THUNDERBALL that wasn't in the books was Terence Young, right down to his tailor. After his Bond films he took on this Joseph Conrad novel where his seafaring abilities came in handy.
Morricone's score is more a haunting evocation of the past than some pirate swashbuckler. And the secondary theme that runs counterpoint to the main one at about 1:20 is actually borrowed from a film from a few years earlier called NIGHTMARE CASTLE, hence the deja-vu. In the more than 400 scores he has done Ennio seldom made a Phillipe Sarde move like this one. It is also weird that this theme in NIGHTMARE CASTLE also runs counterpoint to the main theme in that one in almost the same way. I was thinking of using CASTLE as an original example of haunting Morricone but the arrangement and the surrounding score to this is much more elaborate and lush:





The story is about this fellow for whom the pirate's life is no longer for him. His name is Peyrol (Anthony Quinn) and he seeks refuge from all who want his head in a small coastal town in Napoleanic France. He saves the life and then lives with Arlette (Rosanna Schiaffino) and her aunt (Rita Hayworth). Arlette is haunted by memories of a pirate attack where her parents were killed. Morricone gets to suggest some period folk and sailor music. But the main thrust comes from a nostalgic representation of past glories. Peyrol's theme includes chorus by the I Cantore Moderni di Alessandroni. The viola solos are by Dino Asciolla used mainly for Arlette's nightmares. Bruno Nicolai is once again our conductor.



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 Posted:   Feb 18, 2011 - 12:49 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

one of the (VERY!) few soundtracks by Morricone that I can't appreciate. It surely works as a movie score (think about Peirol Forza Il Blocco for instance). Unfortunately I've always found it too academic (even in the violin virtuoso) and dramatically poor of inspiration. I can't deny that the Cantori Moderni performance is superb and helps to enhance the interest for the overall job.
My favourite track is the very short Momenti Sereni (actually the same melody repeated twice).

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 18, 2011 - 4:43 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

The violin solos are by Dino Asciolla

I'm trying to replay the music in my head but I'm struggling - I think of Dino as a violist rather than a violinist, probably from his marvellous playing on "Moses". Is it definitely the violin he plays on this score?

TG

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 18, 2011 - 6:13 AM   
 By:   cushinglee   (Member)

Thanks, Morricone, for clearing up where I heard that Nightmare Castle theme before. it was driving me nuts. Since there are so many Morricone-scored films I haven't seen (or am likely to), I don't always have a context for connecting a theme to a particular title. Those compilation tracks tend to mush together ...

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 18, 2011 - 8:25 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

The violin solos are by Dino Asciolla

I'm trying to replay the music in my head but I'm struggling - I think of Dino as a violist rather than a violinist, probably from his marvellous playing on "Moses". Is it definitely the violin he plays on this score?

TG


Nope, Tallguy saves my ass again.
Serves me write for doing these things late at nite.

 
 Posted:   Feb 18, 2011 - 9:01 AM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

Since you mention NIGHTMARE CASTLE, will entry #35 be "Barbara Steele" Morricone?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 18, 2011 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Since you mention NIGHTMARE CASTLE, will entry #35 be "Barbara Steele" Morricone?

I'm sure Barbara could steele Morricone any day of the week.
But, no. The only rule I gave myself for this series is that every score contrast with the last one as much as possible.
Obviously NIGHTMARE CASTLE would be the last on my list to contrast with L'AVVENTURIERO. But sometime in the future when I need something to contrast with some comedy or something upbeat.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 18, 2011 - 11:34 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

But sometime in the future when I need something to contrast with some comedy or something upbeat.

Great news that this series does have a future.

Great job, Henry,

 
 Posted:   Feb 18, 2011 - 12:10 PM   
 By:   sprocket   (Member)

Interesting.

I just bought this score based on the samples at S.A.E and chose the shorter, earlier release. I wasn't convinced the additional music was worth having.

Do you have any opinion on which of the releases on CD present the music in its best light. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 18, 2011 - 8:04 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Interesting.

I just bought this score based on the samples at S.A.E and chose the shorter, earlier release. I wasn't convinced the additional music was worth having.

Do you have any opinion on which of the releases on CD present the music in its best light. smile


Well if you are talking the shorter RCA with OCEANO on it, yes. But the shorter Dagored with the same number of cuts as the RCA without OCEANO seemed like they were short changing us.

 
 Posted:   Feb 19, 2011 - 1:01 AM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

Sprocket is referring to the recent expanded version I think of L'Avventuriero


Have also been wondering about it myself I own the Dagored version and never feel compelled to play that one.
Just finished listening to the score again still feel the same about it not really my thing I guess.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 19, 2011 - 2:16 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Sprocket is referring to the recent expanded version I think of L'Avventuriero


Have also been wondering about it myself I own the Dagored version and never feel compelled to play that one.
Just finished listening to the score again still feel the same about it not really my thing I guess.


Look you are talking to a guy who is always fascinated with Morricone expansions, especially if they go beyond a couple of cues.
What is extra on the new one? No new material but, for instance, the first two repeated cues have extra emphasis on strings making it less "dramatic" but more lush and listenable. Someone e-mailed me their favorite cue is "Momenti Sereni" which is really nice. The expanded cut is almost a minute more of that niceness and is allowed to "breath". "Il Varo" is less folk and has a full minute of dramatic build-up before it kicks in. And the second "Tema Di Perol" with emphasis more on Edda and strings is quite a different cut, much prettier in fact. Morricone, being a master orchestrator, does more with his alternates than almost anyone I know.

 
 Posted:   Feb 19, 2011 - 4:08 PM   
 By:   sprocket   (Member)

Yeah, I have the shorter DAGORED Rover.

I looked at the track listings on the expanded release and decided to save myself some dollars by getting the shorter version, which was being sold off at SAE. All the new tracks are variations of tracks on the short version, even with the same names.

I always compare the earlier (available) releases with the expanded ones before buying. So far, I'm leaning towards the shorter versions. You can call me 'Thor'. big grin

BTW, is the ascending main theme based on anything? It sounds familiar.

So, Morricone, it sounds like you prefer the expansion. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2011 - 6:22 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Yeah, I have the shorter DAGORED Rover.

I looked at the track listings on the expanded release and decided to save myself some dollars by getting the shorter version, which was being sold off at SAE. All the new tracks are variations of tracks on the short version, even with the same names.

I always compare the earlier (available) releases with the expanded ones before buying. So far, I'm leaning towards the shorter versions. You can call me 'Thor'. big grin

BTW, is the ascending main theme based on anything? It sounds familiar.

So, Morricone, it sounds like you prefer the expansion. smile


Yeah, it took me awhile to pull both editions out to see what was what but I was surprised at how much more haunting the expanded version made that score.
Anyone who have both concur? Or are most of you like me and didn't even bother to compare.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2011 - 12:51 AM   
 By:   curl   (Member)

I wonder if it really returns like this. I mean how it can be possible with this.

 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2011 - 12:56 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

...are most of you like me and didn't even bother to compare.

I didn't bother either

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2011 - 5:45 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

But sometime in the future when I need something to contrast with some comedy or something upbeat.

Great news that this series does have a future.

Great job, Henry,


Thanks, Tallguy.
I'll keep going as long as there is interest.
I do have a problem keeping these items in the limelight. Sometimes when I don't bolster them they sink faster than Jimmy Hoffa's shoes.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2011 - 1:41 PM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

The main theme to L'Avventuriero is another I've known for many years and it is a score I like even if the non-main theme tracks tend to be a little dissonant. I bought the Dagored release even though I owned the same material on the RCA release.

That main theme is gorgeouss but it does sound like it was composed a generation or so before the majority of the Maestro's other scores.

 
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