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This is a comments thread about Blog Post: The Busting File: A Musical Comparison by Thomas Rucki
 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2012 - 10:35 AM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Nice write-up Thomas. I've included your analysis in my pdf file related to the recording. (And anyone who would like a copy should email me on the same fsm id on aol.)

This is a great Goldenberg score, of which there are way too few that have been issued on CD. Shouldn't be too hard to find this KR gem on Amazon or ebay if it's already gone, BTW.



 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2012 - 8:27 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Has Bruce Kimmel read this yet? I think he'd appreciate this.

The next time I listen to the score, it will be with your post at hand.

BUSTING is still available, for all you who still haven't nabbed this yet.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2012 - 10:26 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Fun post. Glad a few are appreciating this wonderful score - the number of hits this thread has will probably tell you the interest in it, although I think we're finally down to the last 200 copies, maybe a little less. But, glad we did it nonetheless, because Billy deserves it.

Listening to the CD in the film order he suggests will show you exactly why we did what we did with the sequencing to make it a good and dramatic representation of the score, without loading too many "muzak" cues in a row, etc. Also important to point out that every note Billy wrote for the score is on the CD - from those cues, the music editor had his way, cutting short, reusing certain bits, etc. The classical music cues were not on the tape and not written and/or conducted by Billy.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2012 - 1:19 PM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

A very nice piece of work Thomas/Stefan, for a rather underrated score.

 
 Posted:   Mar 10, 2012 - 12:53 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

A very nice piece of work Thomas/Stefan, for a rather underrated score.

A labor of love! Nice to see that Goldenberg is getting some well deserved appreciation.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 10, 2012 - 2:25 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

What puzzles me is where are all those people who always pipe up in various threads and say "We need more Billy Goldenberg?!!"

Presumably they mean that they do need more Goldenberg....just as long as it's Duel or Columbo or Kojak?

As I said - puzzling confused

 
 Posted:   Mar 10, 2012 - 5:09 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

Presumably they mean that they do need more Goldenberg....just as long as it's Duel or Columbo or Kojak?

Perhaps! The same could be said about Gil Mellé. Intrada's Roger Feigelson says: "Blame the fact that there's not enough people interested in Gil Mellé's music!" in terms of hope for future releases of his music. I suppose releases of his Columbo or Six Million Dollar Man scores would sell better.



 
 
 Posted:   Mar 11, 2012 - 7:42 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

For more tracks selection, try and program these two BUSTING themes:

BUSTING MUZAK
01. Main Title
11. Off Beat
13. The Restaurant
21. Muzak Source
14. Happy Birthday

BUSTING MOOD
03. Home Alone
04. The Search
06. The Market
07. The Building
12. Shazam
15. Rizzo's House/Rizzo's Heart Attack
16. The Hospital
19. End Title

 
 Posted:   Mar 11, 2012 - 7:44 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

How about a re-release of Goldenberg's beautiful LP for The Domino Principle?


 
 Posted:   Mar 19, 2012 - 3:13 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Very nice piece of work by Thomas. Many thanks.

Nice score which I listen to often.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 19, 2012 - 10:34 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

"My first feature, Busting [1974], was all about vice cops. Like a journalist, I went around to New York, Boston, Chicago and Los Angeles and spoke with hookers, pimps, strippers and cops and DAs. Every episode in the film was true."
—Director Peter Hyams about "Busting".


__________
"We're gonna stick to you like your underwear."
—Detective Farrel to gangster Rizzo in the boxing arena.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2012 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

DVD Review of "Busting" at DVD Talk in the MOD Squad:
http://www.dvdtalk.com/modsquad/

Read the Final Thoughts of the review
"An overlooked, neglected classic; one of the best cop movies of the '70s?and that means it's one of the best cop movies ever. Director and screenwriter Peter Hyams creates a dyspeptic, sordid world (probably not too far from the truth) where everyone is either on the take or afraid to speak up, and where the efforts of two crusading cops don't amount to squat. Terrifically exciting and depressing as hell, all at the same time, with two perfectly cast leads. A knockout. On content alone, I'm giving Busting our highest ranking here at DVDTalk: the DVD Talk Collector Series award."



__________
"Hey, you recognize Rizzo's girlfriend over there?"
—Detective Farrel to Keneely about Rizzo's connection in the corridor of the boxing arena.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2012 - 2:07 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Please enter the Electra:




_____________________

"Hey, officer, are you aware that that young lady has her mammary glands expose to this entire congregation? Is that legal, Sir? Is it?"
—Detective Farrel to Keneely at The Electra.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2012 - 6:50 AM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Hey, I'd go for McCloud and Rhoda too. He only did about 10 Colombo episodes anyway. Anyway, I started writing this months ago, never got back to it, and figured it was better off in the web-world.


Busting: I'll provide some colour on the guitar lines and the bass lines for the Goldenberg ST record.


There's an electric Fender bass, and a double-bass - maybe add that to the instruments you list if you can update it please, Thomas. Ray Brown on electric bass in a few places. And the amazing Tommy Tedesco is also playing guitar on this one.


The main "funk" motif is used predominantly in these cues: 2, 5, 18, 20 (source). Track 8 is a heavier funk take, a little different than the main one, and also, way cool. The source cue is a much more relaxed take of the main "funk" theme.


Track 1 : Tastful acoustic guitar used for rhythm accents on the up-beat. Sounds like Brazilian percussion devices at the start of the cue.

Track 2 : This is the main "funk" motif. I believe the lead guitar is a Gibson; it comes in after the intro. The "twangy" one that's "back" in the mix is a Fender. Just about sure it's a Stratocaster. Excellent 1970s example of how it's done folks. If you listen closely, you can hear each guitar heading off in their own respective soloing directions, which is pretty cool - kind of "dueling guitars." That's a nasty mix. Very dense. Really makes you feel like it's bad out there in the streets, which the movie did also.

Track 3 : That's an electric guitar that starts the cue. He is striking the string and fret-board at the same time with one-hand, while simultaneously turning the volume knob up, and down. If you listen closely, you can hear his finger hit the fretboard in two seperate instances (not very noticeable) - the player turned the volume up too quickly. You can also hear his hand move along the fret-board in one instance; you hear the rounds of the steel strings against his fingertips. It's also why the volume level is kind of variable; he's doing the volume adjustments on the fly.

Track 5 : The cue starts with the "funk" motif. You'll hear the echo'ed trumpets here about half-way through. And Miles Smiles. FYI: 100% certain that tracks 5 (The Chase) and 18 (Nailing Rizzo) are identical; everything is the same (e.g., piano enters after beat 1 of bar 2; whistle-sound during last B5-chord - you can use the low-G here with the B5) - they are the same exact pieces of music with different titles. (Be honest, the cue could have been used four times for my $$$ - it's that cool.)

Track 6 : Sounds like a DC5(?) at the start (most prominently at ~ 0:18), like the one Pink Floyd used around that time. Some cool left-hand muted piano and double-bass soloing with lots of double-stops, almost strumming.


Track 8 : Real cool blast, and my personal fav. Crazy heavy Gibson guitar solo; the rhythm guys are having a ball; strings that foreshadow the disco era. That's good 70s fusion, man. Let your kids hear this one so they get how it's done. There's a chorus effect being used on the Fender bass; kind of gives it more presence in the overall mix. Cue is in G, with the VI as E - typical R&R and R&B. Here's the bass tab for the cool groove:

||-G--------------------|------------------------||
||-D-7--7--10--7-----|-9------7--------------||
||-A--------------------|----10-----7--8--10--||
||-E--------------------|-------------------------||


If you listen very closely starting about 2:07 (after the 2nd chorus), you will hear there are two guitars again: one soloing; the other doing some feedback, and response to the soloist.


Track 9 : Simple little blues take. There's a Hammond in there. The main guitar is a Fender - that's the twangy guitar at the start of the track, with some effects in the loop. Tommy T may be doing the fills underneath, on his prefered Gibson. Sounds nice.

Track 10 : More echo trummpet and piano. And Miles Smiles.

Track 11 : Love this. Just a little 12-bar take, repeated a few times. Muted Gibson Les Paul guitar arpeggios, kind of in the spirit of Al Dimeola, except this player uses his picking hand to mute near the guitar's bridge. Very loungy. Typical changes; totally cool. The off-beat accents will remind some of the transition cues for Roland in Bad and the Beautiful (e.g., Roland in Babylon). Jazzers are students of history.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2012 - 12:23 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Hey, I'd go for McCloud and Rhoda too. He only did about 10 Colombo episodes anyway. Anyway, I started writing this months ago, never got back to it, and figured it was better off in the web-world.


Busting: I'll provide some colour on the guitar lines and the bass lines for the Goldenberg ST record.


There's an electric Fender bass, and a double-bass - maybe add that to the instruments you list if you can update it please, Thomas. Ray Brown on electric bass in a few places. And the amazing Tommy Tedesco is also playing guitar on this one.


The main "funk" motif is used predominantly in these cues: 2, 5, 18, 20 (source). Track 8 is a heavier funk take, a little different than the main one, and also, way cool. The source cue is a much more relaxed take of the main "funk" theme.


Track 1 : Tastful acoustic guitar used for rhythm accents on the up-beat. Sounds like Brazilian percussion devices at the start of the cue.

Track 2 : This is the main "funk" motif. I believe the lead guitar is a Gibson; it comes in after the intro. The "twangy" one that's "back" in the mix is a Fender. Just about sure it's a Stratocaster. Excellent 1970s example of how it's done folks. If you listen closely, you can hear each guitar heading off in their own respective soloing directions, which is pretty cool - kind of "dueling guitars." That's a nasty mix. Very dense. Really makes you feel like it's bad out there in the streets, which the movie did also.

Track 3 : That's an electric guitar that starts the cue. He is striking the string and fret-board at the same time with one-hand, while simultaneously turning the volume knob up, and down. If you listen closely, you can hear his finger hit the fretboard in two seperate instances (not very noticeable) - the player turned the volume up too quickly. You can also hear his hand move along the fret-board in one instance; you hear the rounds of the steel strings against his fingertips. It's also why the volume level is kind of variable; he's doing the volume adjustments on the fly.

Track 5 : The cue starts with the "funk" motif. You'll hear the echo'ed trumpets here about half-way through. And Miles Smiles. FYI: 100% certain that tracks 5 (The Chase) and 18 (Nailing Rizzo) are identical; everything is the same (e.g., piano enters after beat 1 of bar 2; whistle-sound during last B5-chord - you can use the low-G here with the B5) - they are the same exact pieces of music with different titles. (Be honest, the cue could have been used four times for my $$$ - it's that cool.)

Track 6 : Sounds like a DC5(?) at the start (most prominently at ~ 0:18), like the one Pink Floyd used around that time. Some cool left-hand muted piano and double-bass soloing with lots of double-stops, almost strumming.


Track 8 : Real cool blast, and my personal fav. Crazy heavy Gibson guitar solo; the rhythm guys are having a ball; strings that foreshadow the disco era. That's good 70s fusion, man. Let your kids hear this one so they get how it's done. There's a chorus effect being used on the Fender bass; kind of gives it more presence in the overall mix. Cue is in G, with the VI as E - typical R&R and R&B. Here's the bass tab for the cool groove:

||-G--------------------|------------------------||
||-D-7--7--10--7-----|-9------7--------------||
||-A--------------------|----10-----7--8--10--||
||-E--------------------|-------------------------||


If you listen very closely starting about 2:07 (after the 2nd chorus), you will hear there are two guitars again: one soloing; the other doing some feedback, and response to the soloist.


Track 9 : Simple little blues take. There's a Hammond in there. The main guitar is a Fender - that's the twangy guitar at the start of the track, with some effects in the loop. Tommy T may be doing the fills underneath, on his prefered Gibson. Sounds nice.

Track 10 : More echo trummpet and piano. And Miles Smiles.

Track 11 : Love this. Just a little 12-bar take, repeated a few times. Muted Gibson Les Paul guitar arpeggios, kind of in the spirit of Al Dimeola, except this player uses his picking hand to mute near the guitar's bridge. Very loungy. Typical changes; totally cool. The off-beat accents will remind some of the transition cues for Roland in Bad and the Beautiful (e.g., Roland in Babylon). Jazzers are students of history.




Beautiful. Just beautiful. Keep up the good work and join Kritzerland!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2012 - 12:25 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Please enter the crummy apartment of Officer Keneely after a hard day.





_____________________________________
“I think you’re right. We could be good bad guys. You know. Pays better. Better hours. More cooperations from the police.”
—Ironic detective Keneely to his colleague Farrel in the public toilet of a park.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2012 - 1:01 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

Hey, thanks man. That was very nice of you to say. As I mentioned, the analysis is incomplete, but hopefully the Forum gets the gist.

One thing I forgot was the intro to Track 8, which is the one I did the tab for above. Basically, it starts on a descending Cm pentatonic that terminates on a b5, which you can use w a Cdim, or Gbdim. This is a substitute bc C is our IV in G. It gives the cue it's tension to start off.

The other cool thing I wanted to do, but didn't, was to discuss the 70s concept of "Guitar Wars," which Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck "invented," so-to-speak, in Blow Up in the late 60s while they played w The Yardbirds. JP would have discussed this (viz., "Guitar Armies") very deeply in a 1977 interview w Guitar Player magazine, but I don't have that rag anymore. In any case, the great thing about the "Busting" ST are the guitar wars, or duelling guitars as I called it above. It's really the first time in film that this occurs, so I always placed emphasis on this particular ST, and especially bc of Tommy T's playing. I am not sure if TT is the only guitarist, but it doesn't matter if he did a few different takes bc they shred.

Thanks again buddy. And sorry for any spelling errors in my OP bc I was rushing this AM to get some stuff done.

I really enjoy older Elliot Gould movies, like Busting; his delivery just grabs you.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2012 - 1:18 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I really enjoy older Elliot Gould movies, like Busting; his delivery just grabs you.

Gould was perfect for the early 1970s. By no means the traditional leading man in terms of looks and attitude, he embodied the cynicism and burnt-out feeling the end of the '60s brought about. It's no wonder Gould's star faded by mid decade, though. Poor film choices and changing tastes doomed him to punchline status, but NOT in my house, where he is revered (by me wink)

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2012 - 1:29 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

I'd like to break bread with JP.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2012 - 4:48 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'd like to break bread with JP.

Anytime, pal.

 
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