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 Posted:   Dec 3, 2012 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   Marcus Vinicius   (Member)

Dear James Fitzpatrick, I was wondering if the next recording you could do would be a rerecording of the score to the 1953 film "Martin Luther" by Mark Lothar. It's not a bad score, especially the Main Title, a version of perhaps Martin Luther's most famous hymn.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2012 - 9:56 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Since no one's heard of the film or the composer, I think your wish is unlikely to come true.

 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2012 - 10:13 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

"It's not a bad score" is not the most inspiring of recommendations.

 
 Posted:   Dec 4, 2012 - 12:34 AM   
 By:   goldsmith-rulez   (Member)

Mark Lothar was a leading German film composer of the 1950s, although he didn't write that many scores, and not always for high profle films. He is well respected by experts in the film music of those years though.

The fact that neither composer nor film are internationally known makes the suggestion for a Tadlow re-recording seem downright bizarre, surreal. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 4, 2012 - 1:30 AM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

Why would Tadlow or anyone else record "a not bad score" simply bizare statement.

 
 Posted:   Dec 4, 2012 - 3:01 AM   
 By:   Tester   (Member)

I'm sure that James Fitzpatrick is open to record any score as long as you can pay the full costs and the rights. I myself i'm just hoping to win the lottery to hire them to do some re-recordings, no matter if only 10 persons (including me) buy the CD.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 4, 2012 - 3:44 AM   
 By:   That Bloke   (Member)

Is this a cultural background thing?

Perhaps what the original poster meant by"not a bad score" is that it's actually quite a good score? That's how I read the comment.

In Australia it's common to downplay or understate something instead of over-singing its praises (which doesn't mean to say we're not prone to some hyperbole now and then). I've heard my compatriots say things like "Ben Hur is not a bad film" whereas somebody from another part of the world would say "that movie was freakin' awesome!" and they'd both be expressing the same sentiment.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 4, 2012 - 5:03 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Is this a cultural background thing?

Perhaps what the original poster meant by"not a bad score" is that it's actually quite a good score? That's how I read the comment.

In Australia it's common to downplay or understate something instead of over-singing its praises (which doesn't mean to say we're not prone to some hyperbole now and then).



That's not a bad point, actually. wink

Australia seems to have much in common with Yorkshire, where "all right" or "not bad" are in fact high praise. Some people are so literal!

And as for re-recording "not bad" scores, it's happened before, is happening now, and will happen in the future - being subjective about it.

TG

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 4, 2012 - 5:07 AM   
 By:   mstanwick856   (Member)

Is this a cultural background thing?

Perhaps what the original poster meant by"not a bad score" is that it's actually quite a good score? That's how I read the comment.

In Australia it's common to downplay or understate something instead of over-singing its praises (which doesn't mean to say we're not prone to some hyperbole now and then).



That's not a bad point, actually. wink

Australia seems to have much in common with Yorkshire, where "all right" or "not bad" are in fact high praise. Some people are so literal!

And as for re-recording "not bad" scores, it's happened before, is happening now, and will happen in the future - being subjective about it.

TG


The Yorkshire thing is common in NZ, well at least when I was growing up there.

 
 Posted:   Dec 4, 2012 - 6:05 AM   
 By:   Urs Lesse   (Member)

That's not a bad point, actually. wink

Australia seems to have much in common with Yorkshire, where "all right" or "not bad" are in fact high praise. Some people are so literal!


Nicht schlecht, Herr Specht! cool

 
 Posted:   Dec 4, 2012 - 7:40 AM   
 By:   goldsmith-rulez   (Member)

Or, as they say in the Swabian region of Germany: No negative criticism is praise enough.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2012 - 7:34 PM   
 By:   Marcus Vinicius   (Member)

Ok, ok, so I was a little ambitious, not really understanding how Tadlow worked and all. Come to think of it, the phrase "It's not a bad score" is weak at best.

And also, now that I've thought of it more, Martin Luther doesn't have a lot of universally appealing music to deserve a soundtrack. Most of the music is simply background music that is secondary to what is happening on the film.

So, never mind Mr. Fitzpatrick.

Sometimes you kick yourself for posting stuff.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 7, 2012 - 3:53 PM   
 By:   Marcus Vinicius   (Member)

I think the only song in the score that should be rerecorded is the Main Title. Like I said, most of the other music is not that exciting (no, that was last comment was not an Australian version of "It's amazing").

Perhaps another score to focus on would be the score to the 1954 film "John Wesley". This time I'll warn you guys. Probably few people have seen it, again. It does not have as good acting and sets as "Martin Luther", and I do not have the money to orchestrate a rerecording. I can't say I know who wrote the music.

One thing about "Martin Luther", though, is that it stars John Ruddock, better known to Miklos Rozsa fans as "Chilo" from Quo Vadis.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 7, 2012 - 5:02 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

And also, now that I've thought of it more, Martin Luther doesn't have a lot of universally appealing music to deserve a soundtrack. Most of the music is simply background music that is secondary to what is happening on the film.

So, never mind Mr. Fitzpatrick.

Sometimes you kick yourself for posting stuff.


Okay, so now that you've abdicated your vote, you can throw in with me in pushing Sodom & Gomorrah. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 8, 2012 - 5:23 AM   
 By:   samlowry   (Member)

I would like to propose something certainly more commercial than "Martin Luther" and that would be one CD with TWO Jerry Goldsmith scores on it: SHAMUS and PURSUIT.

Both scores are from the early 70's. They are excellent but the master tapes are allegedly lost.

So a high quality re-recording would fill that void and also it should sell quite well.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 8, 2012 - 2:58 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Really? The films are known to me only by name, and the scores not at all. And I daresay I'm not alone.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 8, 2012 - 3:36 PM   
 By:   samlowry   (Member)

Really? The films are known to me only by name, and the scores not at all. And I daresay I'm not alone.

Indeed, not major films by any means. Shamus was a Burt Reynolds Detective/Actioner from 1973 and Pursuit a Michael Crichton directed TV film from 1972 with Ben Gazzara.

The music though, is vintage Jerry which would delight his fans.... and fans of Goldsmith, there are lots of us smile

 
 Posted:   Dec 8, 2012 - 3:42 PM   
 By:   Dr. Lao   (Member)

Mr. Fitzpatrick should rerecord THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 8, 2012 - 5:35 PM   
 By:   Marcus Vinicius   (Member)

And also, now that I've thought of it more, Martin Luther doesn't have a lot of universally appealing music to deserve a soundtrack. Most of the music is simply background music that is secondary to what is happening on the film.

So, never mind Mr. Fitzpatrick.

Sometimes you kick yourself for posting stuff.


Okay, so now that you've abdicated your vote, you can throw in with me in pushing Sodom & Gomorrah. smile



I thought there was a soundtrack on amazon from it. Is it not complete?

 
 Posted:   Dec 8, 2012 - 5:42 PM   
 By:   Hank V   (Member)

I'll go along with S&G. Imagine if it sounded like and yeilded as much new stuff as Quo Vadis.

 
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