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 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 9:14 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

We can guess when a particular cue in a film was based off of existing material. And I believe sometimes test audiences see unfinished films with temp tracks in place. But are there any definitive lists or production notations indicating what musical cues were temp tracked into a particular film? Right down to the scenes the temp music was tracked into? Just curious.

I remember in the 80's watching a spot on Entertainment Tonight. They were interviewing Don Bluth and previewing the animated film The Secret Of NIMH. They showed a scene from the (unfinished) film and I could clearly hear music from Close Encounters Of The Third Kind tracked into the scene.

That's the only time I've ever actually heard a temp track in a film.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 10:26 AM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

But are there any definitive lists or production notations indicating what musical cues were temp tracked into a particular film? Right down to the scenes the temp music was tracked into? Just curious.

I don't know for sure, but my guess would be that there aren't these kinds of notations. Since temp tracks are used to enhance the director's vision of the film before the film is complete, probably all that's necessary is to have "the right sound" for a cue rather than a specific title. In other words, it's probably not important to notate where a cue originates from, so I imagine it's not indicated. Also, the use of digital software to create temp tracks makes it even less likely - music editors can just uploads bits and pieces of whatever directly into a scene. No labels necessary. Maybe there's also no copyright issue for temp tracks unless it ends up in the final score. This would explain the kind of freedom I sense in some editors approach to temp tracking. Like the recent book called On the Track, which points out that sometimes editors combine many snippets from different films right on top of each other for a temp track cue!

If all this is true, then it's a crying shame for the rest of us who are interested in knowing if there was a temp track and where it came from.

I've always wanted to know precisely what sources were used for the STAR WARS temp track. And I don't mean educated guesses or soundalikes - there are far too many of those on the internet. I'd like to hear from someone who knows for sure what was on there. Will that day ever come?

 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 10:32 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

There's a web page out there that has listed about a dozen or so films and the scores they were tempted with. I don't recall the name.

Sometimes you can read interviews where the composer might mention it, too.

 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Very interesting response. Thank you. As someone whom is always fascinated with "film production" it would be fun to know. Maybe because of fears of copyright infringement, it's a part of film making no one is willing to share.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 1:29 PM   
 By:   c8   (Member)

Sometimes watching the deleted scenes can help you figure it out.

Here's a great example. It was obvious from watching the film that Avatar was temped heavily with Apocalypto, but in a deleted scene (on the expanded set) where Jake has a drug-induced vision, the scene is played with cues from Apocalypto, all but ensuring that connection.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 2:04 PM   
 By:   Tango Urilla   (Member)

You can hear Jerry Goldsmith music temped in the released workprint of Blade Runner.

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=72514&forumID=1&archive=0

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 2:11 PM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

The workprint of John Woo's Hard Target has quite a bit of temp tracking still in place, including selections from Aliens and Lethal Weapon 3.

 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 8:27 PM   
 By:   orion_mk3   (Member)

Carter Burwell provides something like this on his site: http://www.carterburwell.com/projects/Three_Kings.shtml It's a notation of how the temp music, which was licensed for inclusion in the final film, was edited together with his original score (which he notes "was the result of the director explaining, moment by moment, how my music should be more like the temp music").

I seem to recall Jerry Goldsmith mentioning once in an interview that a film (it might have been Alien) was temped with his own music. Far from that making it easier, if I remember he was irritated because he knew where the music was supposed to go in the original films.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 10:33 PM   
 By:   Tango Urilla   (Member)

Yes, that was "Alien". What irritated him even more was when he saw the completed film for the first time and discovered that two temped tracks from "Freud" were left in in lieu of his new score. Apparently someone even rubbed it in by jesting something to the effect of "Repeating ourselves, are we?" After that experience, I'm a bit surprised he agreed to work with Ridley Scott again on "Legend".

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 10:51 PM   
 By:   Ludwig van   (Member)

Carter Burwell provides something like this on his site: http://www.carterburwell.com/projects/Three_Kings.shtml It's a notation of how the temp music, which was licensed for inclusion in the final film, was edited together with his original score.

Interesting - thanks for sharing. But this is still a cue sheet rather than a notation of actual temp tracks, no? By making it into the final film, they would actually become the score rather than temp tracks and so have a cue sheet like any other film.

 
 Posted:   Aug 23, 2013 - 11:20 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

There's a web page out there that has listed about a dozen or so films and the scores they were tempted with.

Films are so easily tempted!

Back in the '80s, I saw advanced press screenings of several films with their temp tracks still in them, but of course now I can't remember them so well. I do very specifically recall the fortune teller scenes from "Big" being temped with John Morris's "The Elephant Man" (and it's easy to hear that influence in the final Howard Shore score). It also had music from "To Live and Die in LA" at the beginning. Just shows how a frothy comedy can be temped with serious music! I saw "Misery" with a temp track, but I can't for the life of me recall what it had in it.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 3:39 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

This one has been mentioned before, but I never figured out if it was actually ever the temp track being heard in previews of STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE...

Here's the story in typical pedantic style -

Late '70s, on TV, a film programme (possibly "Clapperboard") showed a clip from the then upcoming STAR TREK. It was some kind of docking maneuvre, and I was excited to hear from the music used that Jerry Goldsmith was still doing his aggressive '70s-style trademark action stuff.

Several months later I saw the film, bought the LP, and was vaguely disappointed that the score itself bore very little resemblance to what I'd heard in the clip. What happened there?

Fast-forward 30 years and I buy FSM's great CD of MARATHON MAN - and when hearing the "Chase" cues I'm immediately transported back in time. THAT'S the music I'd heard on the telly clip donkey's years before! The most Goldsmithian parts of Michael Small's MARATHON MAN for STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE!

I've since heard it again (somewhere on YouTube) in much briefer form, and buried under sound effects, for one of the original trailers of the film, but I've never been able to confirm if it was actually ever used as a temp track. If so, it's kind of ironic that Goldsmith's score ended up sounding somewhat less "typically complex and abrasively '70s Goldsmith" than Michael Small's chase music from MARATHON MAN did.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 24, 2013 - 4:39 AM   
 By:   trstnvnk   (Member)

Before Avatar was released Cameron previewed 20 minutes of the film in cinemas around the world. These clips had a temp track as well. Quite a few used John Murphy's "Miami Vice" score.

And the Wolverine work print that leaked a couple of years ago was temped with Transformers and a few Brian Tyler scores

 
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