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 Posted:   Sep 11, 2013 - 4:10 PM   
 By:   Michaelware   (Member)


The old one was getting unwieldy. So I made a new thread if you wanna play! Everyone has a valid opinion.

Seconds 8/10 ****
Classic Frankenheimer on blu ray. Middle age crisis dude gets the Rekall treatment hoping for a new life. However there are no second chances as all the same foibles you never faced keep after you. Is the movie Avatar without the flourescent blue toothpaste and fern gully crap flitting around?
Awesome 'in 2 worlds' Goldsmith score demo's why he was the master of exploring the contradictions in human existence. Get the disc it's worth the time next to Manchurian Candidate.

 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2013 - 4:14 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

You're late! http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=98791&forumID=7&archive=0

 
 Posted:   Sep 11, 2013 - 4:35 PM   
 By:   Michaelware   (Member)

From Hell 7/10 ***
I always like what the Hughes Bros come up with, even when the films don't go too deeply they attempt interesting angles.

The version of Alan Moore's book turns a floating head piece into kind of an agatha christie type mystery question if the freemason brotherhood old boy network covered up the Jack the Ripper events for the royals. I don't know why such subjects drive some people to outrage and derision considering this is the same standard stuff Doyle's Sherlock Holmes was always fighting against in book and films. Anyway I liked it for the most part.

The Brave 8/10 ****
Johnny Depp's one and only directed film was self financed and never released in the US. lol I wonder why besides the uncommercial downer story. It's about a guy who agrees to get paid to star in a snuff film in order to save his family.

An indian guy in the southwest faces poverty and existential anguish as his family is about to be evicted to nowhere, and homelessness. He gets a mysterious tip and goes to see a shady group fronting for something even shadier, and asks for the job. He is sent underground to meet McCarthy, who is played by Marlon Brando. The job is 50 000$ to allow the old fat man to tape the indian dude getting tortured and killed. He agrees to do it. He thinks they'll come after him if he runs away with the money, and thinks they will come after him even if he just has it but the old man gives it all to him trusting he will do what he agrees to. uh. He just sold his soul.
More existential troubles ensue. He gets in deeper troubles that will land him in prison. He goes to the old shaman from The Doors movie, who tells him to face his choices. He does, and the movie ends with poetry and ineffable sadness. Depp directs really well, staying close to telling it without trying to be more than it is. The movie doesn't feel like 'plot' or 'ideas,' but real things. Hopelessness is treated as a reality that can't be surmounted especially when the hero makes it worse. He gives in to vengeance then goes farther into killing out of hate. No way out. But he already sold out to the pervert in the wheelchair who has a power beyond his means, because it's Marlon Brando. lol I deleted the next sentence because I dont think it's appropriate!

Baby Secret of the Lost Legend 7/10 ***
Blu ray. Dunno if I reviewed this already but I watched it again. Silly movie with a crazy hard edge for a kids movie. Giant rubber dinosaurs and Sean Young. Obviously you get this movie for the score by Jerry Goldsmith, presented in big loud lossless audio, thought it's a little distorted. Straight ahead adventure scoring with soaring melodics and cool ostinatos and power brass. Love the percussion and crazy tempo changes. I finally get to see this in it's correct aspect ratio.

 
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2013 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   Michaelware   (Member)

The Crossing Guard 7/10 ***.5
Sean Penn's directed films always try to retrieve lost traces of humanity in lost causes.
In this 1995 film Jack Nicholson plays a bitter hateful jeweler who's daughter was killed in an accident. The manslaughter perp gets out of prison and Jack wants to shoot him dead. Revenge. His ex wife turned away from him because he lost himself. She tells him after he throws one of perpetual hissy fits it must be all about him since he never saw the grave or went to the service. Jack boozes and womanizes with hookers. Wow all the stuff effed up guys do. So he gets a gun and goes to the killer's trailer but the gun jams and he looks like a dumbass and sheepishly tries to look mean and gives him 3 days and he'll be back. The Killer says ok. He is trying to deal with the guilt and knows he can't say anything to make anyone have peace of mind or do anything to fix what has happened, but he tells his parents he loves them and appreciates they stand by him. His gf cant take the guilt anymore. Ppl put so many demands on everyone.
Spoilers.
The Jack dude melts down some more, sobs, his wife comes to console him but he thinks she is pitying him for being honest. He tells her he wishes she would die. She exits. The bastard goes back to trying to kill someone out of hatred. Mishaps get in the way, he will go to jail. He goes to shoot the dude but more excitement leads to the killer bringing him to face himself, and the sobbing commences.

It does a good job of showing the sheer self imposed hell of hate and seeking revenge. The lost soul has many people pushing him to change his mind. That's all they need to do. The rest is up to the person. In the end he doesn't do the final act he wants to, but he has damaged everything by hate. Mostly himself. Vilmos Zsigmond's honest unshowy photography brings out the inner grief and deep mistakes to the surface by letting the actors act. Good film. 

Many people on this rock are just like this guy. Negativity, hate and fear of facing what's in the mirror rule. A little hate can damage a lifetime with repercussions on the soul.

 
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