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 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 10:28 PM   
 By:   Josh Mitchell   (Member)

I just discovered that the 2-CD Japanese release that I acquired a few years ago was originally released as a 2-LP set in Japan in 1976:

http://www.discogs.com/Various-European-Cinema-Music-Of-Golden-Age-Historical-Recordings/release/4661111



The CD set was released in Japan in 2006 and is still available. There are even sound samples: http://www.cdjapan.co.jp/detailview.html?KEY=COCB-53560





The definition of "European" here is narrow to say the least, limited to Germany (disc 1) and France (disc 2). All tracks have vocals, but some have lengthy instrumental sections. These are original recordings from the '30s and '40s, but for the most part the sound quality is pretty darn good, and when I'm in the right mood they really hit the spot (despite the fact that I have no idea what the heck they're singing about).

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 1:01 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Very odd title for an album, I agree. Not only because of its limitation to French and German, but because no country in Europe has had a Golden Age of Cinema like Hollywood did (with vertical integration and all that came with it). Or rather, each country has its own particular period that stands out -- German cinema had expressionism in the 20s, for example, and French cinema had the New Wave in the late 50s and into the 60s.

Still, the cues and the selections themselves might be interesting.

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 4:26 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

and French cinema had the New Wave in the late 50s and into the 60s.


Yeah.

But the reason d'etre (did I spell that right?) for the French new wave was to distinguish itself from the decades before.

http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/14447/MUSIC-FROM-THE-GOLDEN-AGE-OF-FRENCH-CINEMA-4-CD/

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 8:37 PM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

Friedrich Hollaender wrote music (a memorable theme) for one of the greatest masterpieces of European cinema, "Der Blaue Engel" (The Blue Angel):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXGMQWdXdyU

The remnants of German Expressionism are readily seen in that opening shot.

I love this film and the performance of Emil Jannings goes down as one of the absolute greatest in film history, IMO. Another astonishing feature of the film is that it was made, virtually sequence by sequence, in English as well. And Pommer/ParaUfamet were a great combination.

Can anyone tell me if a restoration of this film is available because I must have it!!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 9:07 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Friedrich Hollaender wrote music (a memorable theme) for one of the greatest masterpieces of European cinema, "Der Blaue Engel" (The Blue Angel):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXGMQWdXdyU

The remnants of German Expressionism are readily seen in that opening shot.

I love this film and the performance of Emil Jannings goes down as one of the absolute greatest in film history, IMO. Another astonishing feature of the film is that it was made, virtually sequence by sequence, in English as well. And Pommer/ParaUfamet were a great combination.

Can anyone tell me if a restoration of this film is available because I must have it!!


Eureka in the UK has a beautiful Blu-ray out - I believe it has both versions of the film. And I LOVE Frederick Hollander.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 2:22 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Yeah.

But the reason d'etre (did I spell that right?) for the French new wave was to distinguish itself from the devades before.


Absolutely, yes. But it's about the only film direction in France that had such a MASSIVE impact on a global scale -- even more than other French film paradigms like poetic realism, 'cinema du look' 'etc.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2013 - 11:10 AM   
 By:   BJN   (Member)

Friedrich Hollaender wrote music (a memorable theme) for one of the greatest masterpieces of European cinema, "Der Blaue Engel" (The Blue Angel):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXGMQWdXdyU

The remnants of German Expressionism are readily seen in that opening shot.

I love this film and the performance of Emil Jannings goes down as one of the absolute greatest in film history, IMO. Another astonishing feature of the film is that it was made, virtually sequence by sequence, in English as well. And Pommer/ParaUfamet were a great combination.

Can anyone tell me if a restoration of this film is available because I must have it!!


And the pianist of the Weintraubs-Syncopaters, appearing in the film (e. g., at 0:23:00 playing piano whilst drinking beer), is none other than Franz Waxman.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 28, 2013 - 1:15 AM   
 By:   siriami   (Member)

And if you want to see Hollander on-screen - try Billy Wilder's "A Foreign Affair", where he accompanies Marlene Dietrich on piano in the nightclub scene - and another Wilder, "One, Two, Three", where he has a lovely cameo as an orchestra conductor.
Alistair

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 28, 2013 - 1:56 AM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

And if you want to see Hollander on-screen - try Billy Wilder's "A Foreign Affair", where he accompanies Marlene Dietrich on piano in the nightclub scene - and another Wilder, "One, Two, Three", where he has a lovely cameo as an orchestra conductor.
Alistair


Which scene was that? I've seen "1,2,3" several times and have it on DVD and I don't remember an orchestra conductor. It wasn't the Count von Grosse der Schottenborg, was it?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 28, 2013 - 8:21 AM   
 By:   siriami   (Member)

No, nearer the end of the film where Cagney and the Russians they go to East Berlin to the hotel - is it called the "Metropole"? There is an small orchestra there, and Hollander is the conductor.
Alistair

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 28, 2013 - 9:21 AM   
 By:   Regie   (Member)

Ah yes, I remember now!! Thanks

 
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