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 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 3:56 PM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

I was wondering if any FSM'ers in the United Kingdom were going to this concert on November 9th in Manchester. The last concert I attended there was tremendous, it was called "Music for the Silver Screens Greatest Heroes"

Here is a link to the Halle Orchestra who are performing this concert;

http://www.halle.co.uk/concerts-tickets.aspx?day=9&month=11&year=2013

This looks like being another fabulous affair.

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 6:15 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Independence Day - a space oddity?

Actually, that looks to be a good programme. Good value for such a broad range of selections.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2013 - 12:14 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

Independence Day does seem rather out of place in this program, however it's great music.

I'm really looking forwards to going to this with my wife, son and daughter in law, it should be a great night out.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2013 - 2:00 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

I've been to the Hallé and Bridgewater Hall about a dozen times in the past three years while vacationing in Manchester and Yorkshire, including two concerts conducted by Stephen Bell (a film music "blockbuster" concert that included Jurassic Park, Armageddon etc, and a light classical one with Rodrigo's Concerto de Aranjuez). The Hallé are a fine orchestra, and Bridgewater Hall's acoustics are superb. I wish I could be there for the November concert.

I am going to attend another concert in early October that includes a premiere of music Benjamin Britten wrote for radio plays when he was in America during WWII, as well as Shostakovich's Leningrad Symphony:

https://tickets.bridgewater-hall.co.uk/single/eventDetail.aspx?p=22460

There's also a concert by Carl Davis that same week, conducting themes from westerns ("The Wild Wild West":

https://tickets.bridgewater-hall.co.uk/single/eventDetail.aspx?p=22510

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2013 - 4:45 AM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

There's also a concert by Carl Davis that same week, conducting themes from westerns ("The Wild Wild West":

https://tickets.bridgewater-hall.co.uk/single/eventDetail.aspx?p=22510


I went to that 'Wild Wild West' concert earlier in the year in Belfast. It was enjoyable with the expected selections, apart from strangely finishing on a version of 'La Bamba'...I bloody hate that tune!

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2013 - 7:34 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

It'd be a thing to use some IMAGINATION and really go to town on such a concert with JUST 'Battle of Britain' themed material. I suppose 'Independence Day' is there to somehow remind us of 'terror from the skies' and hook in the younger set who know the Bristish composer D. Arnold!

What about a concert with Goodwin's and Walton's BoB material, along with Addison's 'Reach for the Sky' and the Spitfire Prelude & Fugue etc.? Bliss's aerial attack and firemen stuff from 'Things to Come'? 'Warsaw Concerto'? Some stuff from Boorman's 'Hope and Glory' and maybe Vaughan-Williams 'Wasps' Overture or something? Maybe some Carl Davis?

You could link it up with thespians reading excerpts of pilots' diaries, news reports, Churchill impersonations etc., you name it.


No matter how good Goodwin's stuff for '633' and 'Where Eagles Dare' may be, it's a little ... well ... tasteless, given those things are simple adventure movies. How do we want that battle remembered? If you cash in on the Battle of Britain brand name, at least acknowledge the suffering too, instead of cliched triumphalism.


The days of taking risks in concerts seems over.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2013 - 8:47 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

I detect a fair measure of despondency in you post there, William?

The strange thing is that before the Falklands, the BoB and, for that matter, Waterloo, had a degree of significance to me as historic 'packages' one could read about and study as purely aesthetic pastimes - they were remote and divorced from post-WWII reality. Since the Falklands we have had a disproportionately high number of thoroughly nasty 'little' wars within 'memory' that breaks the mould in which WWII had hitherto been distantly contained (at least within my lifetime).

Yet, I would like to think it is still possible to survey all these pools of history with the right sense of scrutiny. But isn't Goodwin's BoB material the 'source' of choice, even for military brass bands here in the UK?

Edit: What I mean to say is that if any composer's output goes some way to make tangible the stife that was WWII, then Goodwin is likely to be the composer of choice. I just think that if you look at the iconic music he's produced for just a few pictures then his style becomes digestible as being 'representative' of the evocation of that period and militaristic overtones that went with it.

The one title I would have liked to have seen included would be for A Bridge Too Far. Addison encapsulates the whole Arnhem misadventure and the music becomes a surrogate in much the same way Goodwin's music is tidily used as a 'wrapper' for BoB. It has it's own 'aerial armada' material which wouldn't really be out of place.

 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2013 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

I detect a fair measure of despondency in you post there, William?


Yet, I would like to think it is still possible to survey all these pools of history with the right sense of scrutiny. But isn't Goodwin's BoB material the 'source' of choice, even for military brass bands here in the UK?



Well, yes, but this sort of music belongs I think in a more general pool. If your concert is CELEBRATING or COMMEMORATING the battle itself, then that needs something a bit more substantial the JUST that. Most of these scores included have nothing to do with that battle. Apart from the fact that T.E. Lawrence was involved for a time in planning future defences for a Blitz, his film isn't even in the same war!

As regards Goodwin's score, you'll know that the RAF bands would rather play his 'Aces High' title march than the main theme, despite the fact that he obviously meant it as a slightly ironic version of 'Deutschland Uber Alles' and it's deliberately as Nazi as you can get, and especially with the visuals! That just makes no sense. Of course, the whole idea with this sort of thing is 'Jolly spirit of adventure and kameraderie, and we all stand together, and the chirpy spirit wins through' etc.. Except it's been usurped by a sort of regressive Tory set, in a cliched way these days.

'A Bridge Too Far' is a case in point, a very fine score, written by a composer who was engaged in genuine tank combat in WWII, and whose music is geared more towards the, 'Let's not dwell on the bad stuff: we'd never survive if we did that' mentality. The score is akin to what he felt the soldiers loved themselves. He does manage a very emotional feel to the jolly music though, that has a wistfulness and elegy about it. But then again, it's got nowt to do with the Battle of Britain, has it? It's 'Market Garden'.

I think this is all cashing in on a 'post-Olympics' feelgood thing, myself.

 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2013 - 10:07 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Here's what I'd have ...

'Battle of Britain March' - Walton
'Ballet, Arial Attack and March' from 'Things to Come' - Bliss
'Wasps Overture' - Vaughan-Williams
'Refugees' - Walton
'Spitfire Prelude & Fugue' - Walton
'Reach for the Sky' suite - Addison
'Hope and Glory' Boorman suite - Peter Martin
'Lark Ascending' - Vaughan-Williams
'Battle in the Air' - Walton
'Finale' from 'Battle of Britain' - Goodwin

I'd also have some wartime songs in there, for the sake of veterans who do matter. y'know, probably with Vera Lynn's 'White Cliffs of Dover' and some Glenn Millar, maybe Noel Coward's 'London Pride'.

And interlinking readings and performances by actors, from pilot's diaries, accounts from civilians in the Blitz, newspaper clippings and bits of Churchill etc...


That'd be decent I think. A 'narrative'.

 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2013 - 11:38 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

That's a patriotic programme, if I may say so.

It's a great way to commemorate the allied sacrifice. You needn't end there, of course. Another day's role-call can encompass the 'land' campaigns and let's not forget the naval operations, either. But that's all very well in principle. To do it in extravagance you'd have guest composer/conductors on and off for various set-pieces to complement the whole (a parallel angle to the cooperation exercised by the joint chiefs of staff command hierarchy.) A three day event to set the benchmark and rekindle a public debate, being much needed in retrospect, to spark an awareness of what armed conflicts of the 20th and 21st centuries really have given us by way of a legacy.

Until such ideals can crystallize, the Manchester concert provides a more down to earth composure. Ah, the strings one could pull if one could . . . smile

 
 Posted:   Oct 1, 2013 - 7:33 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

That's a patriotic programme, if I may say so.




Funnily enough, I don't see it as 'patriotic', just 'appropriate'.

The real problem about this particular concert is the title: it's on November 8th, so it's clearly REALLY to fall in with Remembrance season. They should've called it something else probably.

 
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