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 Posted:   Nov 7, 2013 - 5:21 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

When Victor Young died in 1956, was it from a cerebral hemmorage, a stroke or a heart attack?This was shortly before he was nominated (and would win posthumously) the Oscar for "Around The World In 80 Days". This thread might sound macabre, but I keep reading different accounts about how he died (though no doubt from the heavy smoking and drinking).

 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2013 - 5:27 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Am I confusing him with another composer: some composer went to mow his back yeard and dropped dead during or after.

 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2013 - 5:27 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

According to Wikipedia:

"Young died in Palm Springs, California after a cerebral hemorrhage at age 56. He is interred in the Beth Olam Mausoleum in Hollywood Forever Cemetery, Hollywood, CA. Dr. Max Nussbaum, rabbi of Temple Israel, Hollywood, officiated. His family donated his artefacts and memorabilia (including his Oscar) to Brandeis University, where they are housed today."

 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2013 - 5:29 PM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

Oh no! Victor Young died!?!?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2013 - 5:35 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Oh no! Victor Young died!?!?

And he was so Young.

 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2013 - 6:05 PM   
 By:   Recordman   (Member)

See: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8003

 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2013 - 6:39 PM   
 By:   Krakatoa   (Member)

So unfortunate that he passed away when it looks like his career might have been kicking into really high gear with the "Around the World in 80 Days" Oscar.

Love his score to "Sands of Iwo Jima" and, of course, with "Shane", "The Quiet Man" and "The Uninvited" and other works he lives on through his music.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2013 - 7:23 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Not that death is ever good, but it is a shame when a artist dies when one is still so active. Same with GEORGES DELERUE. I often think if he had live at least another decade what more beautiful music he would have gave us that will never be create, at least in this life.

 
 Posted:   Nov 7, 2013 - 10:45 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Yes, one always wonders what MIGHT have been. What might have been written by John Barry or Maurice Jarre or Georges Delerue or Elmer Bernstein or … or … or. What if John Williams hadn't devoted SO much of his professional time to the Boston Pops? Or Leonard Bernstein to the New York Philharmonic? But when it comes to soundtracks, there always seems to be some energetic musical mind ready to step in and knock our socks off. So while we miss all those great composers, their passing sometimes opens doors for some of the new ones.

 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2013 - 2:29 AM   
 By:   ajhfsm   (Member)

Oh no! Victor Young died!?!?

And he was so Young.


...and whose the Victor in this?

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2013 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

Around the World in 80 Days is a lovely score.

 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2013 - 8:14 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

I know many folks believe film composers are relatively "obscure" in the public mind, but I recall reading an account of Young's funeral that said people lined the streets when his funeral cortege went by. Young was very popular in his day and he was possibly the most-recorded film score composer on commercial recordings.

 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2013 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   LEONCIO   (Member)

I understand that I have died for inoperable brain cancer, contracted while attending on the set of filming the movie "The Conqueror" (1956), in the Escalante Desert, St. George, Utah, USA, a place nearby where the U.S., years ago, detonated a trial, several atomic bombs. While filming this movie, the effects of radioactivity persisted without the authorities have evidence of these effects. Indeed, most of those who participated in the shooting, died half , long term, cancer, starting with its director Dick Powell, followed by actors John Wayne, Susan Hayward, Pedro Almendariz and of course Victor Young.

 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2013 - 11:14 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

I don't believe anyone has ever attributed Young's death to exposure on the set of "The Conquerors."

To my knowledge, the occurrences of cancer began a few years after the making of the film.

From wikipedia: The exterior scenes were shot on location near St. George, Utah, 137 miles (220 km) downwind of the United States government's Nevada National Security Site. In 1953, extensive above-ground nuclear weapons testing occurred at the test site, as part of Operation Upshot-Knothole. The cast and crew spent many difficult weeks on location, and in addition Hughes later shipped 60 tons of dirt back to Hollywood in order to match the Utah terrain and lend verisimilitude to studio re-shoots.[4] The filmmakers knew about the nuclear tests[4] but the federal government reassured residents that the tests caused no hazard to public health.[10]

Director Dick Powell died of cancer in January 1963, seven years after the film's release. Pedro Armendáriz was diagnosed with kidney cancer in 1960, and committed suicide in 1963 after he learned his condition had become terminal. Hayward, Wayne, and Moorehead all died of cancer in the 1970s. Cast member actor John Hoyt died of lung cancer in 1991. Skeptics point to other factors such as the wide use of tobacco — Wayne and Moorehead in particular were heavy smokers. The cast and crew totaled 220 people. By 1981, 91 of them had developed some form of cancer and 46 had died of the disease. Several of Wayne and Hayward's relatives also had cancer scares as well after visiting the set. Michael Wayne developed skin cancer, his brother Patrick had a benign tumor removed from his breast and Hayward's son Tim Barker had a benign tumor removed from his mouth. [10][11]

Dr. Robert Pendleton, professor of biology at the University of Utah, stated, "With these numbers, this case could qualify as an epidemic. The connection between fallout radiation and cancer in individual cases has been practically impossible to prove conclusively. But in a group this size you'd expect only 30-some cancers to develop. With 91, I think the tie-in to their exposure on the set of The Conqueror would hold up in a court of law." Indeed, several cast and crew members, as well as relatives of those who died, considered suing the government for negligence, claiming it knew more about the hazards in the area than it let on.[10][12]
[-/i]

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2013 - 4:49 PM   
 By:   Loverozsa   (Member)

Congratulations to the three idiots who saw fit to make sport out of a great composer's death.
Classy!!!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2013 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   adilson   (Member)

A wonderful composer with gifted melody, pity that he passed way so premature.
Here in Brazil he is still very popular, I think that the Americans not given you the respect that he deserved, also there's the problem that his production is so old and almost nothing is available for the listeners.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2013 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

Congratulations to the three idiots who saw fit to make sport out of a great composer's death.
Classy!!!!!


Yes indeed! Especially when it only happened 50 odd years ago. You'd have thought they'd have waited a decent interval.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 8, 2013 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   velveteyes   (Member)

When Victor Young died in 1956, was it from a cerebral hemmorage, a stroke or a heart attack?This was shortly before he was nominated (and would win posthumously) the Oscar for "Around The World In 80 Days". This thread might sound macabre, but I keep reading different
accounts about how he died (though no doubt from the heavy smoking and drinking).


My uncle, Victor Young, died of a cerebral hemorrhage which caused a major stroke. He was a very heavy smoker; mostly cigars and also enjoyed his alcohol, but not in excess. What probably harmed him the most was that he lost a lot of weight quickly and was working on 4 scores at the same time. He always worked way too hard. Also, they had just bought a vacation home in Desert Hot Springs, CA and my aunt had him up on a ladder, hanging drapes. Their house guests for the weekend were a doctor and his wife. The doctor tried to save him, but he died quickly.

To answer other threads, he did not have cancer and there was a huge outpouring of people at his funeral, but no people on the streets. Three eulogies were given. The first was by Frank Sinatra, the second by Peggy Lee and the final one by Mike Todd. There were a lot of celebrities in attendance but people were not so nosy in 1956 like they are now. Also there was no paparazzi then.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 9, 2013 - 12:32 AM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Around the World in 80 Days is a lovely score.

yup!
http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=14216&forumID=1&archive=1

 
 Posted:   Nov 9, 2013 - 4:35 AM   
 By:   robertmro   (Member)

Victor Young did many more great scores than "Around the World in 80 Days".
He was widely loved by the American public for his radio work and they turned out in large numbers for his funeral.

I will not list his scores but they are all excellent and he was famous for treating all of them with the same care whether they were good or bad films.

It is a tragedy that with the waning interest in Golden Age film scores, his work will not get the attention that it deserves. But some of his songs will live on as classics.

 
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