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 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 2:43 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)


4: I predict, one day in an indeterminate time frame, iTunes dies a death more painful than that of CD's. Only unlike LP's, it DOESN'T come back.


Itunes is not a music carrier. It is an application that organizes files that contain the music (MP3, apple lossless, ...) and as such can definitely be improved upon.

MP3 (lossy), FLAC (lossless) are part of the digital file formats that contain the music, ... Itunes is the CD player or turntable in this case.

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 4:59 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

Anybody thinking that digital is going to stop being the primary means of film and music consumption is, I think, sadly mistaken.

Physical ownership, including LPs, will always have a place because there will always be enthusiasts, but it will be niche rather than mainstream.

The thing about digital is it makes it so much easier and faster to distribute content; it eliminates the need for physical storage space and throwing out; and sound/video quality is only limited by the sizes of files people are prepared to deal with — and it's becoming easier and easier to deal with bigger and bigger files.

Ultimately, the convenience and increasing quality of digital will keep it in pole position. As will the fact the new generations are brought up on it.

Also, digital no longer means you play your music on your tinny computer speakers or though lo-fi iPod ear buds. Playing music from iPod, from your home hard disk or 'The Cloud' through your hi-fi amplifier and speakers is becoming very normal indeed.

Cheers

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 5:14 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

We're all gonna end up like Stallone in Demolition Man !!
Still, there's always sex smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 5:49 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)



Anyway Lukas, are you basically saying: "I haven't house-kept my collection all these years and now I'm seeing how untidy it is?"


Obviously, since getting married Lukas has been ordered to tidy up and get rid of all those useless CDs cluttering up the place big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 6:36 AM   
 By:   Spymaster   (Member)

Obviously, since getting married Lukas has been ordered to tidy up and get rid of all those useless CDs cluttering up the place big grin

This is my assumption too! ;-)

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 6:41 AM   
 By:   Spymaster   (Member)

"Krull" had the 1987 very short Southern Cross release. Then in 1990 SCSE greatly expanded the score, adding over 30 more minutes; evidently they underestimated the initial pressing or 750 copies, or that was just the initial run with an option to press more if need be, and another 2,000 copies were made (can we fault them for making more when it was elling well? Lest we forget your confession a few years ago). Then twenty years later LLLR's did a 2CD set of the what, I assume, is the complete score. Nothing needless re-issued here. And the LLLR's edition SOLD OUT (so people were clamoring for a re-issue), so in another five or ten years undoubtedly another label will re-issue it yet again, and I bet it sells out again.

You're forgetting the Super Tracks 2-CD set that came out between the Southern Cross expansion and the LLL. The content of Krull has been incrementally "improved" across 4 very distinct releases. The sound has been pretty consistent throughout. Had it been done properly first time... well.

I think that's the issue here. Had these titles been done properly first time around, there wouldn't be any need for an expansion. They could simply be re-issued as-is savings folks who already have it a fortune!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 6:41 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

Obviously, since getting married Lukas has been ordered to tidy up and get rid of all those useless CDs cluttering up the place

This is my assumption too! ;-)
----------------------------------------------

That's what lofts and basements are for !! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 6:54 AM   
 By:   Kim Peterson   (Member)

I am as guilty as anyone for starting this trend (Omega Man 2.0) but really, the labels need to show some discipline and not just repackage the same stuff over and over. I don't know how you guys stand for it. I would feel ripped off, seriously.

Lukas


Any one interested in ONE-EYED JACKS? I never owned the first one since I could never listen to Friedhofer.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 6:55 AM   
 By:   slint   (Member)


Ditto. I use iTunes for my 2500+ CD collection, and everyone is stored losslessly. No mp3, no lossy files at all.


That's true. But I already have a 5000+ CD collection in FLAC, and most online stores and sources of legit lossless material (e.g. archive.org) propose FLAC and not some Apple lossless format. I asked Apple many times (amd many years ago) how I could deal with my FLAC files and their devices but they didn't even care to respond.

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 8:06 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Although I'm a committed "CD first, download second" man, the emergence of digital libraries and digital library managers like iTunes has been a major leap forward for those who amass personal collections of music.

I LOVE IT!

Shame then, that Apple seems determined to eventually drop support for personal libraries and make everyone consume music through 'The Cloud'. Their cloud.

I love the ability to take twofer CDs like PETULIA and ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND and split them into their two original albums in iTunes. I love the ability to customize the artwork in iTunes.

I love the ability to change the play order so my iTunes version of DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER is film order, not CD order.

I love how I can create a BODY HEAT score album; a BODY HEAT 'album' album; and separate off the less-listened-to BODY HEAT demos.

I love how I can recreate original classic LP programs like READY WHEN YOU ARE, JB and PLAY IT AGAIN.

Etc, etc.


Do you know something specific? Or are you surmising the future of iTunes? Because it would be nothing short of devastating if future releases of iTunes removes the ability to make custom playlists. Seeing where Apple is going with it's products this has been a concern. They took out the optical drive, they are pushing the cloud where the end user has no control over the content they purchase, etc. I suspect iTunes will eventually eliminate customers ability to physically download the file to their hard drive.

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:11 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

I had quite a bit of music uploaded to iTunes. Then I had to reboot my computer to factory specs and it was all gone.

Does iTunes have a cloud now that retains everything for you no matter what computer you may be on?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:14 AM   
 By:   Spymaster   (Member)

Do you know something specific? Or are you surmising the future of iTunes? Because it would be nothing short of devastating if future releases of iTunes removes the ability to make custom playlists. Seeing where Apple is going with it's products this has been a concern. They took out the optical drive, they are pushing the cloud where the end user has no control over the content they purchase, etc. I suspect iTunes will eventually eliminate customers ability to physically download the file to their hard drive.

This is the risk you take when you put your entire collection in the hands of someone else, which is what you're ultimately doing with proprietory formats. Apple could go bust tomorrow. They might get taken over by an even greedier corporation who has an even more cunning way to control your life. There's a bit of a backlash on the home video front, with "Ultra-Violet" not catching on the way that studios would LOVE it too. Blu-ray collectors seem to appreciate quality over convenience.

All of this is a step towards relieving the consumer of ownership.

Better keep those CDs. You'll see!

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:17 AM   
 By:   Louis Latzer   (Member)

I too am loading my CDs into iTunes. I started with my Classical library, which pretty much fills an ipod classic 180 and am now working on my soundtracks (which may end up needing a second classic!) and jazz/celtic/spoken. Like a lot of you, I prefer physical releases to download only, but what are you going to do?

Two really great things about having these recordings on iTunes are that I can literally carry my entire music library with me when I travel (no more limited space in CD wallets) and I have a backup in case something happens to the CD.

Personally, I have never noticed any huge difference in the sound of downloads from iTunes/Amazon versus CDs, but then I have 65 year old ears and I don't play my music all that loudly.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:20 AM   
 By:   Spymaster   (Member)

Like a lot of you, I prefer physical releases to download only, but what are you going to do?

Fight it. Every single year there are cries of "CD is doomed, downloads are the future" and, you know what, I still haven't noticed much of a difference - other than HMV's supplier woes. I bet I won't this time next year either!

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:24 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Do you know something specific? Or are you surmising the future of iTunes? Because it would be nothing short of devastating if future releases of iTunes removes the ability to make custom playlists. Seeing where Apple is going with it's products this has been a concern. They took out the optical drive, they are pushing the cloud where the end user has no control over the content they purchase, etc. I suspect iTunes will eventually eliminate customers ability to physically download the file to their hard drive.

This is the risk you take when you put your entire collection in the hands of someone else, which is what you're ultimately doing with proprietory formats. Apple could go bust tomorrow. They might get taken over by an even greedier corporation who has an even more cunning way to control your life. There's a bit of a backlash on the home video front, with "Ultra-Violet" not catching on the way that studios would LOVE it too. Blu-ray collectors seem to appreciate quality over convenience.

All of this is a step towards relieving the consumer of ownership.

Better keep those CDs. You'll see!


I always keep my CD's. And prefer buying a physical product over a DL. But I do have hundreds if not thousands of custom playlists in iTunes. If that goes, I won't be a happy camper.

Edit: I burn a lot of my custom playlists to CD for playing in my car. I think I better make a back up copy of every playlist I created. At least I will have a back up copy independent of the iTunes system.

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:39 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Fight it. Every single year there are cries of "CD is doomed, downloads are the future" and, you know what, I still haven't noticed much of a difference - other than HMV's supplier woes. I bet I won't this time next year either!

I find this odd, because I can't help but notice the difference. I noticed as the CD sections shrank in Borders, and then disappeared, and then Borders itself disappeared. I've noticed that I have to do nearly 100% of my music shopping on the internet because there just aren't local stores stocking this stuff. I've noticed that more and more you have to already be in the niche to know about the labels that we know and love here. (All the limited releases, anything not available directly through Amazon or iTunes . . . people aren't even aware that that stuff is available. Same thing with Twilight Time. Even many movie fans who just happen not to be plugged into the online message board communities are unaware that these films are available because there's no kind of general available or distribution.) I've noticed that more and more of my peers are absolutely open about how they download music and movies for free, share around Netflix and HBOgo passwords, and generally don't buy entertainment. I've noticed the fluctuations in CD availability -- that year or two when Disney mostly went download-only, for instance. I've noticed new scores released as limited editions because without that collectibility factor, they're probably not going to move more than a few dozen to, if they're really lucky, a few hundred units. CDs aren't gone, sure. But the market is visibly changing all the time.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:43 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)


Better keep those CDs. You'll see!


Or keep your files on a backup SSD? I'm not in favor of cloud service, my mp3's are on my hard drive, not 'anyone else's' and definitely not apple's. LOL.

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:45 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

Apple are already pushing people towards the 'stream from the cloud' model. You can see it in the changes to iTunes itself and in the withdrawal of the high capacity iPod.

Of course, that doesn't mean they will stop supporting people with personal libraries completely. And if they do, it would only be after they had influenced users to move over to the streaming model. Nevertheless, I merely surmise this is the direction Apple wants to influence its users towards.

After all, it's what people like Netflix do for movies. And Netflix is converting people away from DVD and Blu-Ray ownership.

The trouble with cloud streaming, which, by the way, is how most people now consume movies at home, and will soon become the predominant way of consuming television, is you only get what the cloud provider offers.

That's MY problem with it.

Maybe in the post-CD world, the future of companies like Intrada might be to be the cloud providers of niche soundtrack music that people like Apple and Amazon can't be arsed with or wouldn't do properly. And we might stream from them.

But, anyway, even if Apple goes bust or they stop supporting personal libraries or whatever, the great thing about making music storage and playback a SOFTWARE problem (and a lot of software is free), if you don't like what Apple are doing, move to another library manager. The internet is full of geeks/enthusiasts who are out to give users what they really want.

All that aside, look, I am a pro-CD collector whose second preference is my own managed digital library (I don't want to rely on cloud streaming for my music) but I have to day I find a lot of the "Vinyl/CD forever, digital never" argument to be a bit luddite.

Cheers

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   Kevin Costigan   (Member)

Uploaded my entire CD collection to Apple Lossless and sold the CDs last year. Best choice for me since I never listened the CDs anyway (I'm exclusively iTunes iPod). Less clutter in my apartment, not to mention the freedom to trim down C&C albums to just the selects I want and have everything accesible via just one iPod.

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Uploaded my entire CD collection to Apple Lossless and sold the CDs.

 
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