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 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 2:42 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

To be clear, I was responding to Marcato.

Thanks for the clarification. Two paragraphs that I wrote were included in the text you quoted, hence the confusion.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 2:50 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

My point is this: A producer who goes the Marcato route will make Onya unhappy, and a producer who goes the Onya route will make Marcato unhappy.
The difference is this: Marcato is asking the world to bend to his whims, and Onya learned a long time ago that the world does not bend to his whims.
This is my final word on this topic.



Hey, yeah... where is that guy?
He lights the match, then takes the Ankle Express out of Dodge?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 2:52 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Hey, yeah... where is that guy?
He lights the match, then takes the Ankle Express out of Dodge?


Maybe he's concerned that producers are now considering combining short cues, all because of this thread!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 2:58 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Maybe he's concerned that producers are now considering combining short cues, all because of this thread!


Well, that's what happens when you make a bit of noise.
You risk attracting the wrong kind of attention.

 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 3:04 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Jim Phelps was correct in his wise decision to NEVER click on this thread!


 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 3:12 PM   
 By:   Nono   (Member)

I'd like to have each note separated from the others so that I can make my own music with my CDs.

smile

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 3:24 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

I'd like to have each note separated from the others so that I can make my own music with my CDs.
smile



Your wish is granted, my friend.
The tech exists.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 3:51 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Since we've all kind of chilled a bit: I am a jazz listener, and I would like to share a version of this conversation that occurs among jazz listeners.

There is a trend for certain jazz releases of "historical significance" to release sessions in chronological order, including every alternate take of a tune, and every false start.

Now, in the CD era, this is not a big deal, because you can program the master takes and leave out the rejects.

But this practice occurred in the LP era too, where you had to either endure the program, or constantly get up and move the tone arm. The Savoy label was one of the worst offenders. Examples include the Charlie Parker box set, The two "Black California" anthologies, and the "Brothers and Other Mothers" anthology.

The hardcore jazz guys who want to hear every note in the order everything was recorded will defend this approach. But listeners like me, who want to hear a well-conceived album with variety rather than repetition, do not.

It is a never-ending argument in jazz circles.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 3:52 PM   
 By:   Nono   (Member)

Thanks to this thread I now know that the Maurice Jarre cue that opens his Sunshine album is available in full in a Milan compilation.

I was searching for the album on YouTube to show an example of crossfading, with no results, but found this :


 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 3:54 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Regardless if you're pro or con cross-fades and think composers are Gods, can we all agree no one is perfect and some cross-fades are ill conceived?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 4:02 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Since we've all kind of chilled a bit: I am a jazz listener, and I would like to share a version of this conversation that occurs among jazz listeners.

There is a trend for certain jazz releases of "historical significance" to release sessions in chronological order, including every alternate take of a tune, and every false start.

Now, in the CD era, this is not a big deal, because you can program the master takes and leave out the rejects.

But this practice occurred in the LP era too, where you had to either endure the program, or constantly get up and move the tone arm. The Savoy label was one of the worst offenders. Examples include the Charlie Parker box set, The two "Black California" anthologies, and the "Brothers and Other Mothers" anthology.

The hardcore jazz guys who want to hear every note in the order everything was recorded will defend this approach. But listeners like me, who want to hear a well-conceived album with variety rather than repetition, do not.

It is a never-ending argument in jazz circles.


I hate this practice and don't understand it. I've loved classic jazz since I was twelve years old and heard Take Five on the radio. Would the artists want all this crap out? Perhaps some would, but many would not. But at least put all the alternates at the end of the CD, then it's easy. I automatically delete any alternate - I want to hear what was released.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 4:03 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I think we need to start discussing unnatural thread combinations.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 4:11 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I think we need to start discussing unnatural thread combinations.

And then crossfading those threads.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 4:17 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

I hate this practice and don't understand it. I've loved classic jazz since I was twelve years old and heard Take Five on the radio. Would the artists want all this crap out? Perhaps some would, but many would not. But at least put all the alternates at the end of the CD, then it's easy. I automatically delete any alternate - I want to hear what was released.

Funny story:

Billy Bauer, the jazz guitarist, played on countless sessions as a sideman, but released only one album under his own name. The album was called "Plectrist."

When Verve wanted to release it on CD, they asked him about including alternate takes. He said, "Nope. If I didn't like 'em then, I won't like 'em now." The label pleaded with him, citing historical significance, etc., but Bauer wouldn't budge.

So here is what Verve did: They included the alternates as hidden tracks, indexed before track one, and didn't list them. The listener would have to manually back track past track 1 to hear them. Verve assumed that an old man would not figure this out.

So the CD is released, and Billy gets his copy. He plunks it in the CD tray and hits the play button. And the first thing he hears are the rejected takes!

Turns out that he had a very early model CD player, before the technology was perfected, and it started playing from the very first point, before track 1!

He was not happy, but I'm pretty sure that all US copies of "Plectrist" are like this.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

, but found this :


You found an unavailable video?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 5, 2019 - 5:36 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

"Take Five".
Nice.

 
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