Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Sep 14, 2020 - 10:05 PM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

For your viewing and listening pleasure.

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 2:38 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

Oh, yeah. (The sound of genius.)

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 2:38 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

I must have been excited.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 5:59 AM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

Brilliant ! Exciting to watch.



 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 6:06 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Brilliant music of course--the film is at its best during the first twenty minutes--I like it that the metal plate instrument thing is played by the cool-est looking musician in the orchestra.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 6:31 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Isn't it supposed to be an anvil -- which would yield a weightier sound?

I heard this played by the NY Philharmonic once, and of course it's a supremely rousing curtain raiser. While the Gerhardt recording was, and is, spectacular, there is something unique about the sheer weight of the live orchestral sound in a good hall.

 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 8:42 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Isn't it supposed to be an anvil -- which would yield a weightier sound?

A childhood friend of mine briefly attempted to learn the trombone, but he quickly grew weary of lugging the thing in its case every day to school.

I can only imagine what an anvil player must endure.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 9:39 AM   
 By:   paul rossen   (Member)

Isn't it supposed to be an anvil -- which would yield a weightier sound?

I heard this played by the NY Philharmonic once, and of course it's a supremely rousing curtain raiser. While the Gerhardt recording was, and is, spectacular, there is something unique about the sheer weight of the live orchestral sound in a good hall.


I believe this was played by the NY Philharmonic under the baton of Leonard Slatkin at a film music concert. If I’m correct they also played a bit of El Cid. It was pure excitement hearing El Cid played by the NY Philharmonic.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 9:56 AM   
 By:   SteveP   (Member)

Isn't it supposed to be an anvil -- which would yield a weightier sound?
………………….

A childhood friend of mine briefly attempted to learn the trombone, but he quickly grew weary of lugging the thing in its case every day to school.

I can only imagine what an anvil player must endure.

…………………..

That's classic. Would make a great Monty Python sketch…

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 10:31 AM   
 By:   chriscoyle   (Member)

Isn't it supposed to be an anvil -- which would yield a weightier sound?

I heard this played by the NY Philharmonic once, and of course it's a supremely rousing curtain raiser. While the Gerhardt recording was, and is, spectacular, there is something unique about the sheer weight of the live orchestral sound in a good hall.


I thought I read in the notes for the Gerhardt Herrmann album they used a brake drum for the sound? There are pictures of Herrmann in the notes attending the rerecording so what ever was used I'm sure he approved.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 3:17 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Yes, I'm sure you are right. For anvils you need to turn to the classic Solti Rheingold, where eighteen of them pound out the smithing of the enslaved Nibelungs.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 4:01 PM   
 By:   chriscoyle   (Member)

Yes, I'm sure you are right. For anvils you need to turn to the classic Solti Rheingold, where eighteen of them pound out the smithing of the enslaved Nibelungs.

Well I’m not sure I’m right. Maybe there is a photo of the original being recorded somewhere that can clear it up. The video is wonderful. I’d love to hear this live.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 4:20 PM   
 By:   bagby   (Member)

Isn't it supposed to be an anvil -- which would yield a weightier sound?

I heard this played by the NY Philharmonic once, and of course it's a supremely rousing curtain raiser. While the Gerhardt recording was, and is, spectacular, there is something unique about the sheer weight of the live orchestral sound in a good hall.


I thought I read in the notes for the Gerhardt Herrmann album they used a brake drum for the sound? There are pictures of Herrmann in the notes attending the rerecording so what ever was used I'm sure he approved.


The liner notes reference an "extraordinarily vicious sounding steel plate" for 'On Dangerous Ground.' The brake drum is used in 'White Witch Doctor' on the same album.

The anvil is used in a key moment in the Rozsa re-recording of 'Four Feathers' in the same Gerhardt series for RCA.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2020 - 4:25 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

Yeah I've posted this video a handful of times over the years and think it's great someone has started a thread over it. Re-watching it now and in this context has me celebrating all over again having been there with Goldsmith conducting ST: Voyager and with Jarre conducting Lawrence a week earlier, both with symphony orchestras and in different cities/states. Everyone should have this kind of experience. It brings together we who are film-first or music-standalone in a venue that makes you want to shout with joy and wish you could freeze-frame and then unfreeze the experience at will.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2020 - 1:43 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

Isn't it supposed to be an anvil -- which would yield a weightier sound?

I don't know the answer, but you asking this reminded me of a story:

I remember someone once telling me Oddjob's theme (the 'ding-ding-ding') was played on an anvil, probably one of the heaviest things you could use in an orchestra.

It was actually played on the finger cymbals, literally, the lightest thing you could use in an orchestra!

Cheers

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2020 - 2:10 AM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

I thought I read in the notes for the Gerhardt Herrmann album they used a brake drum for the sound? There are pictures of Herrmann in the notes attending the rerecording so what ever was used I'm sure he approved.

Christopher Palmer's liner notes refer to a "vicious-sounding steel plate." It was likely the Volkswagen brake drum below.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2020 - 4:32 AM   
 By:   chriscoyle   (Member)

Bagby is right the brake drum was for WWD. IMHO no composer created such unique main titles as Herrmann. The Day the Earth Stood Still, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, Mysterious Island and On Dangerous Ground. They all capture the essence of the film. Rozsa is close with Spellbound, Double Indemnity, Ben Hur , The Red House and others. But Herrmann such a genius.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2020 - 5:09 AM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

For your viewing and listening pleasure.



Salonen’s Herrmann The Film Scores CD is tops for me. He took great film scores and transformed them into concert works. Such fine interpretations of all the classic Herrmann scores. F451 is my favourite suite on that album. It’s haunting.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 4:21 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

That guy banging the anvil or whatever is a sinister presence if ever there were. Fantastic! Oh and the conductor has a real natural move to first base--check it out at 1:05: Facing the orchestra, Salonen's in the stretch, gives it the southpaw snap, and wham the runner's picked off! Get's 'em every time. And great YER OUT! call at the end. Holy cow, an umpire to boot. Impressive!

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2020 - 5:46 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

It's about time the LA concert scene got out of its Disney/Williams rut.

Thanks for posting this.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2020 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved...