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 Posted:   Feb 19, 2021 - 9:44 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Do you have favorites from the '50s from the former 20th Century Fox?

I start below with my faves in chronological order. I've limited mine - up to 3 titles per name - since a composer (or two) dominating the list entirely yields dry results. Also, I sought a balanced represenation of most who toiled within Fox during this decade. Hope I didn't omit any. smile

What are yours?

1950

Whirlpool (David Raksin)
Night and the City (Benjamin Frankel)
Where the Sidewalk Ends (Cyril Mockridge)

1951

The Thirteenth Letter (Alex North)
Bird of Paradise (Daniele Amfitheatrof)
The House on Telegraph Hill (Sol Kaplan)
David and Bathsheba (Alfred Newman)

1952

Kangaroo (Kaplan)
O. Henry’s Full House (Newman)
Les Miserables (North)
My Cousin Rachel (Franz Waxman)

1953

Niagara (Kaplan)
White Witch Doctor (Bernard Herrmann)
The Robe (Newman)

1954

Broken Lance (Leigh Harline)
Garden of Evil (Herrmann)

1955

House of Bamboo (Harline)
The Virgin Queen (Waxman)
The Rains of Ranchipur (Hugo Friedhofer)

1956

On the Threshold of Space (Lyn Murray)

1957

Boy on a Dolphin (Friedhofer)
The Three Faces of Eve (Robert Emmett Dolan)
The Abominable Snowman (Humphrey Searle)

1958

The Long, Hot Summer (North)
The Barbarian and the Geisha (Friedhofer)
The Roots of Heaven (Malcolm Arnold)
The Inn of the Sixth Happiness (Arnold)

1959

Journey to the Center of the Earth (Herrmann)
The Story on Page One (Elmer Bernstein)

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 1:37 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

Where do we find the list where we can see all the titles? I see you have some Brit films released through Fox on your own list, Z. Gimme some pointers please.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 4:45 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

I think this will fascinate the brain for a while:

List of 20th Century Fox films (1935–1999)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20th_Century_Studios#Lists

June 9, 1950 Night and the City Made in the UK

October 31, 1957 The Abominable Snowman of the Himalayas US distribution, produced by Hammer Film Productions

We know that The Abominable Snowman was made by Hammer, but I also expect that U.K. film productions had received partial funding from U.S.A.
Hollywood probably made a 'deal'; shoot the picture with Forrest Tucker and subsequent distribution throughout American theaters guaranteed.

Jules Dassin's Night and the City had both a Frankel and a Waxman score for geographical distribution reasons. I think this was a joint collaboration between U.K.'s 20th Century Fox branch and Hollywood's 20th/Fox.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 5:14 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

I decided to narrow it down to only one title per year, and I tried to mention only the scores which I think are 5-star (outta 5, not 10) masterpieces. To be truthful, some of them might only be 4 outta 5, but I didn't want to skip any years. I see that I fell into the trap of "accidentally" choosing everything by the same small handful of composers.

1950 - BROKEN ARROW (Hugo Friedhofer)
1951 - DAVID AND BATHSHEBA (Alfred Newman)
1952 - THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO (Bernard Herrmann)
1953 - THE ROBE (Alfred Newman)
1954 - THE EGYPTIAN (Alfred Newman AND Bernard Herrmann)
1955 - SOLDIER OF FORTUNE (Hugo Friedhofer)
1956 - BETWEEN HEAVEN AND HELL (Hugo Friedhofer)
1957 - THE ABOMINABLE SNOWMAN (Humphrey Searle)
1958 - THE YOUNG LIONS (Hugo Friedhofer)
1959 - THE SOUND AND THE FURY (Alex North)

And another one from 1959 - THE ALLIGATOR PEOPLE, BY IRVING GERTZ!!! Yeah man!!!

 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 5:50 AM   
 By:   mgh   (Member)

1952 Way of A Gaucho (Sol Kaplan)
1958 In Love and War (Hugo Friedhofer)

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 7:35 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Additional comments:

-) Most of Sol Kaplan's film music doesn't resemble that which he provided for STAR TREK. Of all the LPs & CDs I've owned, Kangaroo comes closest to Kaplan's TREK - with several of its 'dark' passages forshadowing the brooding "The Enemy Within".

-) Robert Emmett Dolan's The Three Faces of Eve approaches the territory that one might typically associate with Alex North: 'psychological' underscoring meshed with sultry/bluesy saxophone. Dolan holds his own amongst his A-list colleagues.

-) perusing these listings reveals a greater ratio of titles unreleased on albums than what has made it onto discs thus far. Never saw nor heard the 1957 The Abductors, but I'm aware it has an early score (his first?) by Paul Glass - so I'm interested in it just for this fact. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 10:02 AM   
 By:   tiomkinfan   (Member)

I would have to include Newman's The Diary of Anne Frank from 1959; one of his final scores at 20th century-Fox.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 11:28 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

) Robert Emmett Dolan's The Three Faces of Eve approaches the territory that one might typically associate with Alex North: 'psychological' underscoring meshed with sultry/bluesy saxophone. Dolan holds his own amongst his A-list colleagues.

Knowing Fox's factory system, and considering that Dolan was a music director/songwriter/Broadway guy who scored few, if any, films of this dramatic weight, is it possible that some ghosting was involved?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 11:57 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

) Robert Emmett Dolan's The Three Faces of Eve approaches the territory that one might typically associate with Alex North: 'psychological' underscoring meshed with sultry/bluesy saxophone. Dolan holds his own amongst his A-list colleagues.

Knowing Fox's factory system, and considering that Dolan was a music director/songwriter/Broadway guy who scored few, if any, films of this dramatic weight, is it possible that some ghosting was involved?


Yes, it's possible.

I read about Roy Webb writing music for Return of the Fly but the credit only went to Paul Sawtell & Bert Shefter.
I even read speculation about how the 'Alfred Newman sound' was the handiwork of Cyril Mockridge.
Also, Hugo Friedhofer was content to provide music without onscreen credit.

If The Three Faces of Eve was ghost-written, then I don't know who it was. [My understanding is that access to the manuscripts/cue sheets is how this information gets gleaned] The end result sounds like an ideal listening companion to an Alex North soundtrack. Whether Dolan was the sole author or had assistance, I love this soundtrack and am glad it is on disc.

 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 1:11 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

If it helps any, both BMI and ASCAP only list Dolan for "The Three Faces of Eve".

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 20, 2021 - 1:56 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Yes, and Cliff McCarty's generally authoritative Film Composers in America cites only Dolan.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2021 - 12:19 AM   
 By:   Ag^Janus   (Member)

Nice! Rolling the dice ...

1950 Broken Arrow
1951 The Day The Earth Stood Still
1952 Lure of The Wilderness
1953 White Witch Doctor
1954 Untamed
1955 Seven Cities of Gold
1956 The Revolt of Mamie Stover
1957 Boy On A Dolphin
1958 Ten North Frederick
1959 Journey To The Center of The Earth

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2021 - 8:50 AM   
 By:   Irv Lipscomb   (Member)

Zardoz Speaks: In the excellent picture you posted, I see David Raksin, Alfred Newman and Bernard Hermann (smiling no less). Could you identify the others in left to right order please? Thank you.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2021 - 9:10 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

Zardoz Speaks: In the excellent picture you posted, I see David Raksin, Alfred Newman and Bernard Hermann (smiling no less). Could you identify the others in left to right order please? Thank you.

I don't recognise Raksin in that photo. I think it's, from left to right, Franz Waxman, Alfred Newman, Bernard Herrmann, ?, ?, and Hugo Friedhofer.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2021 - 9:10 AM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

Zardoz Speaks: In the excellent picture you posted, I see David Raksin, Alfred Newman and Bernard Hermann (smiling no less). Could you identify the others in left to right order please? Thank you.

I don't recognise Raksin in that photo. I think it's, from left to right, Franz Waxman, Alfred Newman, Bernard Herrmann, ?, ?, and Hugo Friedhofer.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2021 - 11:59 AM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Zardoz Speaks: In the excellent picture you posted, I see David Raksin, Alfred Newman and Bernard Hermann (smiling no less). Could you identify the others in left to right order please? Thank you.

Sure thing, Mr. Lipscomb.

Franz Waxman, Alfred Newman, Bernard Herrmann, Ken Darby (tallest guy in back & middle), Vinton Vernon (sound recordist/sound mixer), Alex North and Hugo Friedhofer.

A fan of Friedhofer posted this photo years ago here @ FSM - I simply re-posted it here.

My guess is that this photo was likely from 1952. Alex North was an East Coast guy who probably moved west in '51 - by which time David Raksin's contract with Fox ended (Raksin was by then @ MGM). Further conjecture: Waxman may have recently won his Academy Award Oscar for A Place in the Sun, which may be why Newman's got his arm on him?

Still, my guesswork has no explanation for the absence of either Cyril Mockridge or Sol Kaplan.
If Kaplan was not present due to HUAC, then this photo might be from 1953 ...

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2021 - 12:09 PM   
 By:   ZardozSpeaks   (Member)

Zardoz Speaks: In the excellent picture you posted, I see David Raksin, Alfred Newman and Bernard Hermann (smiling no less). Could you identify the others in left to right order please? Thank you.

I don't recognise Raksin in that photo. I think it's, from left to right, Franz Waxman, Alfred Newman, Bernard Herrmann, ?, ?, and Hugo Friedhofer.


Shame on Graham. smile

Mr. Watt doesn't know his southwest North from his northeast North?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2021 - 12:14 PM   
 By:   Graham Watt   (Member)

Zardoz Speaks: In the excellent picture you posted, I see David Raksin, Alfred Newman and Bernard Hermann (smiling no less). Could you identify the others in left to right order please? Thank you.

I don't recognise Raksin in that photo. I think it's, from left to right, Franz Waxman, Alfred Newman, Bernard Herrmann, ?, ?, and Hugo Friedhofer.


Shame on Graham. smile

Mr. Watt doesn't know his southwest North from his northeast North?


Ha! I'm hanging my head in embarrassment at my Foe-Pah. I DID recognise North but "forgot" to mention him, then I got all nervous when I posted the same thing twice and wasn't able to fix it due to Innernet probs.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2021 - 2:34 PM   
 By:   Dylan   (Member)

Out of what hasn't already been mentioned:

1955
Love is a Many Splendored Thing (Alfred Newman, main theme composed by Sammy Fain)

1957
Peyton Place (Franz Waxman)

1958
A Certain Smile (Alfred Newman, again with the main theme composed by Sammy Fain)

1959
The Best of Everything (Alfred Newman)
Blue Denim (Bernard Herrmann)
Beloved Infidel (Franz Waxman)

And many more. This was a wonderful decade for scores at 20th Century Fox.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 21, 2021 - 2:43 PM   
 By:   TacktheCobbler   (Member)

My attempt at picking favorites for this decade by year:

1950-All About Eve (Alfred Newman)
1951-David and Bathsheba (Alfred Newman)
1952-My Cousin Rachel (Franz Waxman)
1953-The Robe (Alfred Newman)
1954-The Egyptian (Alfred Newman, Bernard Herrmann)
1955-Untamed (Franz Waxman)
1956-Anastasia (Alfred Newman)
1957-Peyton Place (Franz Waxman)
1958-The Inn of the Sixth Happiness (Malcolm Arnold)
1959-The Diary of Anne Frank (Alfred Newman)

Quite a few other favorites not mentioned for me. As others have mentioned, a great decade for film scores from this studio.

 
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