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 Posted:   Jul 29, 2018 - 10:06 AM   
 By:   TacktheCobbler   (Member)

Finished Wuthering Heights (vastly different and more depressing than the 1939 film, which had previously been my only exposure to the story) and moving on to the other major Bronte novel, Jane Eyre.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2018 - 2:15 AM   
 By:   Rameau   (Member)

Just finished, Dean & Me: A Love Story by Jerry Lewis & James Kaplan. I'm not really a fan of either of them, & certainly not of the double act, but I do like reading about those times & show biz. They met & teamed up in the mid-forties & became very successful very fast, & then in the fifties things started to sour, I think that was mostly due to the movies which side-lined Dean, who started to feel very unappreciated. It's a great story of a magical time, I really enjoyed it.

I am fascinate by Dean Martin, who seems kind of unknowable, full of friendly charm, but no one got that close to him. Jerry Lewis said that his three loves were, golf, women & booze (in that order) & he didn't actually drink that much from the mid-fifties, he had this drunk act, singing with glass in hand, but it was all an act, he'd learnt it from a comedian & all those Rat Pack Los Vegas gigs, he'd have the same glass of whisky in his hand all evening, & unlike the rest of the clan, he'd go to bed early so he could be up very early for golf.

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2018 - 12:05 PM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

"The Fix" by David Baldacci.

Definitely not the kind of novel I would usually read. I just needed some easy-reading trash for a long holiday journey, and that's exactly what I got.

Characters appear in pairs in almost every scene, with the second person seemingly there only to ask questions that explain what's going on to some perceived less able reader. This results in terribly stilted dialogue. There is also a bunch of mistakes that should have been picked up by an editor.

Another reason for buying the book was to see what it takes to make a best-seller these days. I can report that good prose is not one of the necessary ingredients.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 14, 2018 - 9:12 AM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

Time Out of Joint - Philip K Dick

Has started off well enough. The last one I read, Lies Inc., had a nice idea but became unreadable. Just awful in the middle and I couldn't get past it.

 
 Posted:   Aug 15, 2018 - 3:14 PM   
 By:   theMaestraX   (Member)

The President is Missing by Bill Clinton & James Patterson.
*Definately a page turner*

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2018 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

I'm finally reading THE MAKING OF AN AMERICAN FILM COMPOSER: A STUDY OF ALFRED NEWMAN’S MUSIC IN THE FIRST DECADE OF THE -SOUND ERA by Fred Steiner

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2018 - 1:43 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

In between working through the fascinating but densely-written history of St Petersburg (one of the Peters was said to have died from a bloody episode of piles whereas it’s believed he was poisoned and strangled) I’ve read Dick’s Time Out of Joint and have started Murakami’s A Wild Sheep Chase for the umpteenth time.

 
 Posted:   Aug 20, 2018 - 8:49 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Franz Kafka's diaries.

I'm still on the fence as to whether Kafka was truly a neurotic, unhappy mess, or merely just THE master of black comedy. Or both.

 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2018 - 12:20 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

THe Jewish Joke Book - A Short History With Punchlines
by DEvorah Baum

NOTE: This book is rated PC - SJW
NOT recommended for the humour impaired or easily offended virtue signallers.

 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2018 - 12:24 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Thanks Alot Mr. Kibblewhite
By Roger Daltrey

 
 Posted:   Nov 29, 2018 - 4:20 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

"Understanding Our Unseen Reality: Solving Quantum Riddles" by Ruth Kastner. (2nd re-reading).

The best non-mathematical book on quantum theory I've read. She also has a mathematical book on the subject that's also very good.

There are many interpretations of quantum mechanics such as Many Worlds (MWI), Copenhagen, Bohmian Mechanics and so on. The interpretation she has worked on is called the Transactional Interpretation (TI). It's not so well-known but I find it much more plausible than the others.

TI removes the need for multiple universes springing into existence when anything happens (as in MWI) and eliminates the need for any conscious observer (as in some sub-interpretations of Copenhagen). It explains where the Born Rule (which calculates the probability of a quantum event) comes from. Stuff like the Schrodinger's Cat problem is easily solved. It also dispenses with the macroscopic / microscopic divide problem that has plagued quantum mechanics from the outset.

AND it's got cool backwards-in-time waves!

 
 Posted:   Dec 15, 2018 - 5:30 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Maire Brennan - The Other Side Of The Rainbow

(Clannad singer autobiography)

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 8, 2019 - 10:07 AM   
 By:   The Wanderer   (Member)

A Drop Too Many by John Frost

It's about the Battle of Arnhem by the soldier Anthony Hopkins played in A Bridge Too Far. It's very good.

 
 Posted:   Feb 8, 2019 - 4:40 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

"Understanding Our Unseen Reality: Solving Quantum Riddles" by Ruth Kastner. (2nd re-reading).

The best non-mathematical book on quantum theory I've read. She also has a mathematical book on the subject that's also very good.

There are many interpretations of quantum mechanics such as Many Worlds (MWI), Copenhagen, Bohmian Mechanics and so on. The interpretation she has worked on is called the Transactional Interpretation (TI). It's not so well-known but I find it much more plausible than the others.

TI removes the need for multiple universes springing into existence when anything happens (as in MWI) and eliminates the need for any conscious observer (as in some sub-interpretations of Copenhagen). It explains where the Born Rule (which calculates the probability of a quantum event) comes from. Stuff like the Schrodinger's Cat problem is easily solved. It also dispenses with the macroscopic / microscopic divide problem that has plagued quantum mechanics from the outset.

AND it's got cool backwards-in-time waves!


So is this readable from a layperson point of view as a science enthusiast who is not a scientist? I read a lot about science but not in technical contexts.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 14, 2019 - 7:28 AM   
 By:   DogsPart2   (Member)

recently finished "Hillbilly Elegy"
Absolutely superb.

next up "The Friends of Eddie Coyle".

 
 Posted:   Feb 14, 2019 - 7:36 AM   
 By:   ryanpaquet   (Member)

I just finished two books:

Zelda: The history of a legendary saga Volume 1 by Mehdi El Kanafi and Nicolas Courcier - An excellent look at the Legend of Zelda series from the first game up until Skyward Sword. It's nice to have a book like this full of words, rather than pictures. I enjoyed it so much I already have the second volume, Breath of the Wild in the mail.

Yoko Kanno's Cowboy Bebop Soundtrack by Rose Bridges - this is a short book from the 33 1/3 Japan series. It's a wonderful examination of the music in the Cowboy Bebop TV series. It contains a lot of information on the episode titles, and the pieces of music they reference, how the show and music was produced, how some musical pieces by Kanno actually influenced how the episodes were produced and so much more. Highly recommend it as well.

Currently reading:

Anime Impact: The Movies and Shows that Changed the World of Japanese Animation
by Chris Stuckmann
- so far it's really great.





 
 Posted:   Feb 15, 2019 - 4:55 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

Scratchman
by Tom Baker

A Doctor Who story conceived and developed in the 1970s by Baker with Ian Marter (Harry Sullivan from the TV series) finally in novel form.

Game Changer
by Matthew Sadler and Natasha Regan

A book about the self-taught chess AI AlphaZero

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 15, 2019 - 5:16 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Just finished Cornelius Ryan's masterful A Bridge Too Far, and have started on Dolce Vita Confidential, Shawn Levy's look at post-war Rome's development into "Hollywood on the Tiber". I've got Murakami's latest by the bed also, which I've delayed reading for the last few weeks just for the sheer pleasure of knowing I've got it to come (Killing Commendatore).

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 15, 2019 - 8:04 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I just finished The Lost Man by Jane Harper. I had mentioned previously that I really enjoyed her first novel The Dry. The Lost Man is her third novel. In each novel, the Australian landscape is like an actual character. In this last mystery novel, I learned about what it was like to live in the Outback with hours between farms. The heat was unbelievable. Some of the interesting things I learned were: each farmer carries a lot of water and food in their cars when they mend fences. Often they have to spend nights in the desert. A doctor comes in by plane at least once a year to check for skin cancers due to the baking sun. And more. It was a good mystery.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 15, 2019 - 6:45 PM   
 By:   Xebec   (Member)

Just finished Cornelius Ryan's masterful A Bridge Too Far, and have started on Dolce Vita Confidential, Shawn Levy's look at post-war Rome's development into "Hollywood on the Tiber". I've got Murakami's latest by the bed also, which I've delayed reading for the last few weeks just for the sheer pleasure of knowing I've got it to come (Killing Commendatore).

A Drop Too Many was pretty good, TG.

 
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