Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Ben-Hur
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 1:53 PM   
 By:   Superman1701   (Member)

Im grateful for this release. While i am unfamiliar with the score i am very familiar with the film and i love it. This is an all new score to me and i look forward to receiving it. Thank you FSM for putting this out there! It doesnt matter what alternates are on there or how many times this score has been released and for some people this is the first one so i intend to enjoy this. smile

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 1:57 PM   
 By:   drivingmissdaisy   (Member)

How dare they give us another great release that they put their blood, sweat, tears and MONEY into. I swear if I ever see that Kendall guy again I may just smack em....

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 2:02 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

Agreed, but I wanted to accentuate the positive first. The inter-track studio ambience was and is a novel idea.

A while ago I went to the trouble of carefully adding similar inter-track backgrounds to the FMS CD of Rozsa's Jungle Book acetates. The abrupt cuts in the noisy CD made it just about unlistenable, but after giving those silent portions some texture (copied and built from various brief "noise" sections of the CD), it's far more enjoyable. Took me many hours to do, but the result was worthwhile, with smooth, natural-sounding transitions. If ever they re-release this they'd do well to use my CDR as a master instead of what they put out last time :-)

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 3:24 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

A superflous release. All relevant bases covered already.



Goldsmith is my favorite composer, but Ben-Hur is my favorite film score.

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 3:48 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

And I once saw Jerry Goldsmith conducting a concert suite of Ben Hur for Dr Rozsa's 80th birthday.

Truly a miracle, Lukas.

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 3:52 PM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

2000 copies? They will all fly off the shelves in less than a week!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 5:33 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....The inter-track studio ambience was and is a novel idea.....


The idea of adding studio ambience to the inter-tracks may well be a novel concept in its application to CD music, but Marilee Bradford is an old pro and I feel certain she was fully aware of and knowledgeable about this kind of thing, particularly when applied to dialog tracks, going as far back as 1930s optical sound film recording and then later magnetic recording.

Every recording stage, actual room, soundstage set, camera set-up scene angle, or outdoor location has its own ambient sound, and in order to intercut the dialog tracks successfully, you need to record this ambient sound to "slug" the gaps between sentences, phrases, or words when you are intercutting camera angles.

For all of my years in the business, and probably 35 years before, this "ambient sound" was called "room tone". And so, usually each day, the sound man would ask for quiet from everyone on the set while he recorded a minute or two sound master of "room tone" in that set or location, usually slating it with the specific location and/or scene for later ID purposes.

He would always have to say something like, "Start Room Tone.....Silence Please," and then roll the tape, and then, at the end, say, "End Room Tone," or else a sound editor would simply think the track was blank.

Eventually, back in editing, the "room tone" piece for each sequence would be duplicated as much as necessary to intercut into the dialog so that the dialog sounded complete as one piece. Otherwise, the sound was choppy. Although a layman would think this material was silent, believe me, you can easily tell the difference between the silence recorded on the set, and the true silence of blank leader filling out the soundtrack, and it's very jarring when contrasted and played over those big studio speakers in the mixing room.

I believe Ray Faiola has often been doing this as well---adding ambience to the track breaks---with a number of the archival BYU/SAE releases where his big problem is often the inherent "ambience" of the studio acetates he is working with---many of which have their own set of sound problems.

All in all, it's a very time consuming process, but it's done in the interest of a better sounding, and consistent quality, product.



 
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 5:36 PM   
 By:   TruPretender   (Member)

A superflous release. All relevant bases covered already.


I imagine we're going to wait in vain for an explanation of this choice insight.

I love Jerry Goldsmith.

But he doesn't rule.

To play your own game.


Here, Here. Jerry is my favorite composer, but that comment kinda sounded arrogant.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 5:44 PM   
 By:   Clark Wayne   (Member)

I almost feel I should post 'Aw heck no-no old rubbish-give us some synthesizer scores from the 80's' just to wind up the grumpy old guys who post those sort of comments on the modern threads.

But I wouldn't be so petty..............smile




(I'm sure it's great really but I don't know the film or the score very well, so I'm happy to sit this one out so someone who's a true fan can get it).


 
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 5:45 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

.....The inter-track studio ambience was and is a novel idea.....


The idea of adding studio ambience to the inter-tracks may well be a novel concept in its application to CD music, but Marilee Bradford is an old pro and I feel certain she was fully aware of and knowledgeable about this kind of thing, particularly when applied to dialog tracks, going as far back as 1930s optical sound film recording and then later magnetic recording.

Every recording stage, actual room, soundstage set, camera set-up scene angle, or outdoor location has its own ambient sound, and in order to intercut the dialog tracks successfully, you need to record this ambient sound to "slug" the gaps between sentences, phrases, or words when you are intercutting camera angles.

For all of my years in the business, and probably 35 years before, this "ambient sound" was called "room tone". And so, usually each day, the sound man would ask for quiet from everyone on the set while he recorded a minute or two sound master of "room tone" in that set or location, usually slating it with the specific location and/or scene for later ID purposes.

He would always have to say something like, "Start Room Tone.....Silence Please," and then roll the tape, and then, at the end, say, "End Room Tone," or else a sound editor would simply think the track was blank.

Eventually, back in editing, the "room tone" piece for each sequence would be duplicated as much as necessary to intercut into the dialog so that the dialog sounded complete as one piece. Otherwise, the sound was choppy. Although a layman would think this material was silent, believe me, you can easily tell the difference between the silence recorded on the set, and the true silence of blank leader filling out the soundtrack, and it's very jarring when contrasted and played over those big studio speakers in the mixing room.

I believe Ray Faiola has often been doing this as well---adding ambience to the track breaks---with a number of the archival BYU/SAE releases where his big problem is often the inherent "ambience" of the studio acetates he is working with---many of which have their own set of sound problems.

All in all, it's a very time consuming process, but it's done in the interest of a better sounding, and consistent quality, product.


I don't want no stinkin' room tone between tracks.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 5:57 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....I don't want no stinkin' room tone between tracks.....


smile

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 6:36 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

For all of my years in the business, and probably 35 years before, this "ambient sound" was called "room tone". And so, usually each day, the sound man would ask for quiet from everyone on the set while he recorded a minute or two sound master of "room tone" in that set or location, usually slating it with the specific location and/or scene for later ID purposes.

He would always have to say something like, "Start Room Tone.....Silence Please," and then roll the tape, and then, at the end, say, "End Room Tone," or else a sound editor would simply think the track was blank.




It's still done that way in film-making, Manderley. On outdoor shoots it matters a lot, the sound of rivers, trees, birds, anything that might need looped for edits of real-time recording.

The director will shout for a 'wild shot' where the ambient sounds are heard so that they can be edited into any mix for sound. Wild shots are also used without sound, for visual edits and patch-ups.

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 7:25 PM   
 By:   bdm   (Member)

Many a shoot I have been asked (told) to be quiet for "room tone" inside or out. Our sound mixer friends need it when they have us loop all our dialoguefrown

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 7:31 PM   
 By:   drivingmissdaisy   (Member)

Are we now honestly arguing about ROOM SOUND????

WOW, I'm just, WOW, speechless.

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 10:05 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


I have not wanted to do the "room tone" between tracks because of listening problems when making playlists in iTunes, etc.

Lukas


 
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 10:08 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

(...) (Understandably, they cannot offer the same deal for international orders but I would check with them anyway as my guess is that they still are very reasonable in that area as well).

Indeed they are. Shipping for this set to Europe is $12.99


Wow! That certainly leaves Intrada's $13 in the dust!

smile

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 10:17 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

. . . I'm happy to sit this one out so someone who's a true fan can get it.


Looking over your other favorites, I think you'd become a true fan of BH in no time, CW.

(I know, I know. Sixty bucks.)

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 10:28 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I have not wanted to do the "room tone" between tracks because of listening problems when making playlists in iTunes, etc.

Lukas


It's an ALBUM, for heaven's sake. I don't want a "concert" listening experience - I'm glad you didn't do it, you should never do it, and neither should anyone else. Go to a concert if you want room tone. smile I would never want an album to sound like one long piece of music.

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 10:39 PM   
 By:   bdm   (Member)

Regards the arguing about Room Tone - one thing should be clear by now; someone will find something to complain about with every disc ever produced, so why let it bother you? That's the magic of the Internet for you!wink

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2012 - 10:44 PM   
 By:   BasilFSM   (Member)

I bought this along with the Star Trek TNG box and Point Blank / The Outfit.

Interestingly enough, the total shipping cost on my order amounted to just under $19, and considering I bought 20 CDs worth of music that amounts to only $.95 shipping per CD. (if you order the Star Trek TNG box on its own, it's 14 discs and shipping is about $13.30. I'm in Canada, of course)

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.