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 Posted:   Aug 11, 2014 - 12:29 PM   
 By:   judy the hutt   (Member)

Francois Truffaut once said that professional jealousy is only important when it leads to murder

 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2014 - 12:41 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

I saw a quote stating " I don't like Hans Zimmer, his music isn't interesting... ( I dont exactlly the end of the sentence, but barely it said that ) " it dismisses the recognition it once had ..."
Sorry for my poor English ;-)


So who said it then?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2014 - 11:28 PM   
 By:   gyorgyL   (Member)

Also Bernard Herrmann said about French composer Michel Legrand " is petit, petit, petit !" ( small, small, small )

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2014 - 11:28 PM   
 By:   gyorgyL   (Member)

I saw a quote stating " I don't like Hans Zimmer, his music isn't interesting... ( I dont exactlly the end of the sentence, but barely it said that ) " it dismisses the recognition it once had ..."
Sorry for my poor English ;-)


So who said it then?


It was on a forum elsewhere, I couldn't recall who wrote it, but I felt this told by a composer

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2014 - 11:44 PM   
 By:   Johnjerry   (Member)

I know that this a gossip subject but after reading the new John Williams book I was very much disappointed by Ennio Morricone who said that the Star Wars score wasn't any good and that a fugue would be more proper for the main title. He also dismisses all composers who use orchestrators. Of course we all know that in some cases orchestrators do most of the job but in most cases orchestrators are just glorified copyists.

I interviewed Morricone for the old SOUNDTRACK! magazine in 1991.
When I asked him about the fellow composers he admired he immediately replied "Williams and Goldsmith"... only them. Then he continued admitting that he knew they used orchestrators, and he strongly disagreed with that and said "..there're two main reasons for this behaviour: one doesn't know music, and this is really not the case for Goldsmith and Williams, or one accepts too many scores."
That's what he said to me back then.

 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 4:14 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Then he continued admitting that he knew they used orchestrators, and he strongly disagreed with that and said "..there're two main reasons for this behaviour: one doesn't know music, and this is really not the case for Goldsmith and Williams, or one accepts too many scores."
That's what he said to me back then.





This keeps coming up again and again, like a bad note in a rushed orchestration.

A few composers, including Miklos Rozsa have defended the notion of using orchestrators. If you've seen an MR score sketch, you'll know that 90% of the info is right there. Eugene Zador made certain decisions, like which of the violin rank takes what lines etc., but that's more to do with transcribing and alotting PARTS, and that's not the main jist of orchestration. In fact that's sometimes better done on the micro level, by people who know the orchestras that're going to record it, who's strong on what amongst the second violins etc.. And that'd be the case in a Hollywood environment, with fast turnaround and intimacy between the players.

Now, the reason Morricone goes on about orchestrators is that he liked very specific (as did Goldsmith and sometimes Herrmann) EFFECTS that needed to be calculated, and were often the result of serendipitious 'events' in a runthrough that could be repeated elsewhere. But y'know, it's not so easy for a symphony orchestra to replicate, say, 'The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly' because it requires layering, odd instrumentation and a very particular recording ambience. Very unique. Not so with 'Star Wars' which uses a conventional SO.

So let's not get stuck on that old chestnut. Most of the great film composers who 'didn't orchestrate', did orchestrate.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 11:44 PM   
 By:   Johnjerry   (Member)

Then he continued admitting that he knew they used orchestrators, and he strongly disagreed with that and said "..there're two main reasons for this behaviour: one doesn't know music, and this is really not the case for Goldsmith and Williams, or one accepts too many scores."
That's what he said to me back then.





This keeps coming up again and again, like a bad note in a rushed orchestration.

A few composers, including Miklos Rozsa have defended the notion of using orchestrators. If you've seen an MR score sketch, you'll know that 90% of the info is right there. Eugene Zador made certain decisions, like which of the violin rank takes what lines etc., but that's more to do with transcribing and alotting PARTS, and that's not the main jist of orchestration. In fact that's sometimes better done on the micro level, by people who know the orchestras that're going to record it, who's strong on what amongst the second violins etc.. And that'd be the case in a Hollywood environment, with fast turnaround and intimacy between the players.

Now, the reason Morricone goes on about orchestrators is that he liked very specific (as did Goldsmith and sometimes Herrmann) EFFECTS that needed to be calculated, and were often the result of serendipitious 'events' in a runthrough that could be repeated elsewhere. But y'know, it's not so easy for a symphony orchestra to replicate, say, 'The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly' because it requires layering, odd instrumentation and a very particular recording ambience. Very unique. Not so with 'Star Wars' which uses a conventional SO.

So let's not get stuck on that old chestnut. Most of the great film composers who 'didn't orchestrate', did orchestrate.


You're right and I strongly agree with you.
I only wanted to point out that Morricone admires Williams and Goldsmith.
Yes, it's true, he addressed the orchestration thing with a lot of severity, and I think nowadays his observation strongly gets to the point with the younger composers' generation.
We all know what's the state of the art in our times and how little people can really orchestrate his scores...but this is another story for another topicwink

 
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