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 Posted:   Aug 12, 2018 - 6:57 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I always enjoy these podcasts. Nice to have John Takis join in with the 3 of you.

While listening to the scores from these two Twilight Zone episodes, I kept marveling at some of the musical instruments Goldsmith employed because I have heard them in his various westerns. However, these instruments fit into non-western dramas.

Also, I was amazed at how his music could actually paint a picture. An example was the music used when Helen was struggling to remember what happened when she was a small child. It is like his music actually portrays her brain's struggle for recall. Very skillful.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 13, 2018 - 12:57 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I always enjoy these podcasts. Nice to have John Takis join in with the 3 of you.

While listening to the scores from these two Twilight Zone episodes, I kept marveling at some of the musical instruments Goldsmith employed because I have heard them in his various westerns. However, these instruments fit into non-western dramas.

Also, I was amazed at how his music could actually paint a picture. An example was the music used when Helen was struggling to remember what happened when she was a small child. It is like his music actually portrays her brain's struggle for recall. Very skillful.


What's your favourite TZ score from that episode 10?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 13, 2018 - 7:47 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Wasn't in love with the music in either TZ, but I liked Nightmare As A Child the best.

 
 Posted:   Aug 13, 2018 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   Jens   (Member)

Also, I was amazed at how his music could actually paint a picture. An example was the music used when Helen was struggling to remember what happened when she was a small child. It is like his music actually portrays her brain's struggle for recall. Very skillful.

I completely agree! Jerry has a real gift for expressing a character’s thought processes and psychological state in the music. It happens so much, I actually have to stop myself from commenting on it sometimes, and then I wonder if I’m just applying the film context back to the music, and reading more into it than what’s musically there. That’s why it’s great to have someone else say that it’s apparent even without the images!

Dear Jens, I totally agree that the classic Dies Irae is slower. But look for example: Michale Daugherty transformed it to Tango rhythem in the last part of his Metropolis Symphony and John Williams used intentional the notes backwards in Black Sunday. I think the Dies Irae Motive can be used so flexible! I speculate that it´s deep anchored in the collective consciousness of classical trained composers (and musiclovers). It lurks around on nearly evry Corner!

You make great points, and I will absolutely concede it's not unlikely that Jerry was influenced by it for this particular score.

 
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