Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2004 - 7:43 PM   
 By:   Atahuaplanca   (Member)

Does anybody own this score? I've found it on the web, and it is said to be very thrilling. However, I can't find the CD to purchase.

Would you recommend it? I like Corigliano's "Red Violin", however I guess this one's a bit different.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2004 - 8:12 PM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Heinrich, I'd recommend it wholeheartedly. A stunning score. Very "organic" in its massive percussion (a bit like Goldenthal there), and with a gorgeous love theme. This is really something out of the ordinary.

 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2004 - 8:17 PM   
 By:   Moonie   (Member)

Does anybody own this score? I've found it on the web, and it is said to be very thrilling. However, I can't find the CD to purchase.

go to half.com
its there
sd

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2004 - 10:30 PM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

A very atonal score and no where near as melodic as Red Violin but I absolutely love it.

Have to say though that it might not be to everyones taste.

 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2004 - 10:33 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

I'll second that. If your sound system can handle it, 'The Whirpool' will blow your socks off and the final transformation will turn your head inside out.

A very haunting, melancholy love theme too, if I remember. I have it on vinyl.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 1, 2004 - 10:36 PM   
 By:   kaimakan   (Member)

John Corigliano is one of the greatest contemporary composers as well as one of America's finest musicians. His two symphonies are masterpieces, his concertos rank among the best of the best, and his opera "The Ghosts of Versailles" is one of the very few modern operas that has a shot at being remembered. It is depressing that he has scored only "Altered States" and the awful "Revolution" as well as "The Red Violin," one of the extremely rare examples of an Academy Award going to a score that actually deserved it. It troubles me that there are so few directors with the musical sophistication to realize the potential dramatic weight and emphasis of a score by a composer as talented as John Corigliano. In my estimation the music for "Altered States" is much more interesting than the movie. Don't miss it!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 1:12 AM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)

Terrific score - the love theme is so moody and beautiful, it's my favorite part of the score. It's just a small ray of sunshine amidst the atonal madness, and adds a real dimension to the score. Too bad the planned Dolby re-release that would have paired this score with Revolution never happened.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 5:07 AM   
 By:   Melchior   (Member)

IMO this film has one of the most beautiful love themes.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 7:49 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

I love a lot of Corigliano's music....but this one doesn't do it for me.

-Joshua

 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 3:11 PM   
 By:   Josh "Swashbuckler" Gizelt   (Member)

A friend of mine played the LP of this score, and I bought the CD when it came out. I was blown away by the powerful percussion and the unbridled sound this score had.

I didn't ever actually get around to seeing the film Altered States until last Winter, when I rented the DVD of it. The score is really at the forefront of the sound mix in the film.

I thought that the film, while interesting, was somewhat limited in emotional scope, although it was visually stunning. That's true of most Ken Russell films, though, so I wasn't really all that surprised. However, the music raised the level of intensity of several scenes to a white-knuckle level.

The film/music interaction is quite complex, but I must say that one of the main pleasures of listening to this score is the textures and upheavals that constantly occur.

Because I was familiar with this score and with Corigliano's first symphony (which I found to be extremely moving), both of which are firmly rooted in modern musical idioms, I was quite surprised when I saw The Red Violin, and found Corigliano writing in a very different, yet no less involving style.

What I think is interesting about Corigliano in both of these cases is how each of these films rely heavily upon their scores, and his dramatic acumen seems to be quite spot-on. Both scores are incredibly appropriate, and yet both are also very clearly his music.

In both cases, however, it must be remembered that the filmmakers involved understood music and were willing to allow Corigliano to maintain his own musical identity.

Nevertheless, I think it is quite a shame that more filmmakers do not seek out his considerable talent.

I have never seen Revolution (most who have told me I am not missing much beyond the score), so I have no idea what that score sounds like, or how the music interacts with the film.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   Bill R. Myers   (Member)

I never bought the album but this was a striking, carefully constructed piece of work. In an interview done in 1992 (for Soundtrack! magazine) Shirley Walker said that this score was a good example of uncompromised, "real" music, and she was right.

There are a lot great pieces in the score, but the one I remember most was the cue for the scene where William Hurt reverts to his primitivism and runs wild in the zoo. A lively, virtuoso piece.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   Atahuaplanca   (Member)

Thank you all, that sounds great. smile

I'll try to get this music as soon as possible. I have no doubts I will like it very much, as I tend to like this described style of music very much.

It's been often mentioned that Elliot Goldenthal has borrowed some orchestrational techniques from John Corigliano, and habing been familiar with "The Red Violin" only, I couldn't see this connection.

Now that I've listened to some sound clips from "Altered States" at amazon.com, I recognize this certain connection.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 4:07 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Wasn't Goldenthal Corigliano's assistant on ths score?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 6:34 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

It's been often mentioned that Elliot Goldenthal has borrowed some orchestrational techniques from John Corigliano, and habing been familiar with "The Red Violin" only, I couldn't see this connection.

Now that I've listened to some sound clips from "Altered States" at amazon.com, I recognize this certain connection.


I believe that Corigliano was Goldenthal's teacher, though I've not positive on this fact.

-Joshua

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 10:27 PM   
 By:   Atahuaplanca   (Member)

Sure, Corigliano was (as well as Aaron Copland) Goldenthal's teacher, they met every week for quite a time and Corigliano would teach him his knowledge of music.

I refered to Goldenthal's statement, that he borrowed some "typical" Corigliano orchestrations for "Sphere" (1998). "Altered States" proves this.

Has Goldenthal really been creditet to this score as an assistant of Corigliano's?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 2, 2004 - 11:26 PM   
 By:   Howard L   (Member)

I have never seen Revolution (most who have told me I am not missing much beyond the score), so I have no idea what that score sounds like, or how the music interacts with the film.

[as Howard L reaches into his bag of Messageboard tricks... he emerges with this entry from 11/28/98; he had just given the film a fresh viewing:]

When Revolution came out 10 years ago, it bombed. BOMBED. The critics were quite correct in assaulting the "script" for its lack of exposition, coherency and overall state of being. As for Mr. Pacino's incomprehensible dialect...whatever. Since he's of the meticulous Method school, I'll give him the benefit of the doubt.

These negatives notwithstanding, this film is a visual stunner that carries a sustained mood, and Corigliano's score is suddenly a revelation. I can only describe it as Herrmannesque in terms of orchestration/ long 'chordality'/aural mood sustenance. He also creates a rousing number not unlike L. Rosenthal's Pegasus for Clash Of The Titans to underscore a cruel faux fox hunt.

Most of the score proper is in the first 1/2 -2/3 of the film. The rest of the film contains more period-sounding source music. Finally, Revolution--in a similar period-piece manner and of a similar period to Amistad--almost looks like it was filmed during the Revolutionary War. I think of the look as 'perpetually autumnal'.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2018 - 1:38 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I FINALLY saw this movie tonight. It's been on my list for a while, due to the Corigliano score which I've owned and loved for years, but it took it being available on Netflix for me to take the plunge.

What a spectacularly good movie! Much, much better than I had anticipated. Of course, the score is extremely front and center and plays an enormous part in the effect.

 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2018 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

IMO this film has one of the most beautiful love themes.

Tell it to Timmer!!!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2018 - 1:58 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

By the way, funny to think that when this thread was started, there was no Netflix streaming!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 12, 2018 - 2:01 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

Dennis McCarthy, or the producers of the Next Gen Star Trek, sure liked that AS Love Theme.
I heard it pop up a few times, while watching back in the day.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2018 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.