Film Score Monthly
Screen Archives Entertainment 250 Golden and Silver Age Classics on CD from 1996-2013! Exclusive distribution by SCREEN ARCHIVES ENTERTAINMENT.
Wild Bunch, The King Kong: The Deluxe Edition (2CD) Body Heat Friends of Eddie Coyle/Three Days of the Condor, The It's Alive Ben-Hur Frantic Nightwatch/Killer by Night Gremlins
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
LOG IN
Forgot Login?
Register
Search Archives
Film Score Friday
Latest Edition
Previous Edition
Archive Edition
The Aisle Seat
Latest Edition
Previous Edition
Archive Edition
View Mode
Regular | Headlines
All times are PT (Pacific Time), U.S.A.
Site Map
Visits since
February 5, 2001:
14916936
© 2014 Film Score Monthly.
All Rights Reserved.
Return to Articles

On Monday, July 21st, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present BEHIND THE SCORE: THE ART OF THE FILM COMPOSER at LACMA'S Bing Theater. Talk show host Tavis Smiley will moderate the discussion, which will feature LA Philharmonic conductor Gustavo Dudamel (whose first feature score, The Liberator, is due to be released by Deutsche Grammophon at the end of this month), two-time Oscar winner Gustavo Santaolalla, and another fellow, can't quite place his name..oh yes, John Williams. Although the event is currently sold out, there will be a standby line outside the theater the evening of the show, in case seats become available at the last minute.


Along with announcing the latest composers, songwriters and music editors invited to their Music Branch, the Academy has also announced some new music-related rules and regulations:

In the Music (Original Song) category, songwriters from established musical groups may now have the option to request that their song submission be considered under their group name.  If the request is approved and the song wins the Original Song award, the group would receive a single statuette.

Music Branch members may not contact other Music Branch members to promote the nomination of their own song in any way, including via mail, email, telephone or social media [out of tact, let's just pretend we don't know who inspired that one].  Additionally, Music Branch members may not attend any special live performances of eligible songs unless attached to a screening.


For those interested in a different type of beloved movie music than what we usually promote on this website, Richard Lester's classic A HARD DAY'S NIGHT is receiving a 50th anniversary re-release this weekend, including a run at L.A.'s Silent Movie Theater. Live and Let Die composer (and, of course, Beatles producer) George Martin received his only Oscar nomination for his work on the film.


CDS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK

Come Il Vento - Shigeru Umebayashi - Beat
Fargo - Jeff Russo - Sony
F.B.I. Operazione Vipera Gialla
 - Francesco De Masi - Beat
Game of Thrones: Season 4
 - Ramin Djawadi - Watertower
I Dolci Vizi...Della Casta Susanna
 - Gianni Ferrio - Beat
I Due Sanculotti 
- Piero Umiliani - Digitmovies
It's a Wonderful Life - Dimitri Tiomkin - Kritzerland
La Legioni Di Cleopatra
 - Renzo Rossellini - Saimel
Quando Le Donne Avevano La Coda
 - Ennio Morricone - Digitmovies
The River Murders
 - Pinar Toprak - Caldera
Tarzan
 - David Newman - Milan
The Thomas Crown Affair 
- Michel Legrand - Quartet
Vita Segreta Di Una Diciottenne
 - Gianni Marchetti - Beat


IN THEATERS TODAY

Deliver Us from Evil - Christopher Young
Earth to Echo - Joseph Trapanese
Gabrielle - Francois Lafontaine
Life Itself - Joshua Abrams
Tammy - Michael Andrews
Venus in Fur - Alexandre Desplat


COMING SOON

July 8
The Fault in Our Stars - Mike Mogis, Nathaniel Walcott - Atlantic
Sabotage - David Sardy - BFD
July 15
I Origins - Will Bates, Phil Mossman - Milan
Planes: Fire and Rescue - Mark Mancina - Disney
July 22
Broken City - Atticus Ross, Claudia Sarne, Leopold Ross - BFD
The Host - Antonio Pinto - BFD
Snowpiercer - Marco Beltrami - Varese Sarabande
2 Guns - Clinton Shorter - BFD
July 29
Dexter: Season 8 - Daniel Licht - Milan
The Liberator - Gustavo Dudamel - Deutsche Grammophon
August 5
Into the Storm - Brian Tyler - Varese Sarabande
Mood Indigo - Etienne Charry - Milan
Step Up: All In - Jeff Cardoni - Milan
August 12
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 
- Michael Giacchino - Sony
Date Unknown
A Dio Piacendo
 - Marco Werba - Intermezzo
Aux Yeux Des Vivants
- Raphael Gesqua - MovieScore Media/ScreamWorks/Kronos
Bates Motel - Chris Bacon - Varese Sarabande
Grand Piano - Victor Reyes - MovieScore Media/Kronos
I Basilischi/Before the Revolution
- Ennio Morricone - GDM
Isabella: Duchessa Dei Diavoli
 - Sante Maria Romitelli - Kronos
La Cieca Di Sorrento
 - Carlo Savina - Kronos
Le Temoin
- Piero Piccioni - Music Box
Legendary
- Paul Leonard-Morgan - MovieScore Media/ScreamWorks/Kronos
Les Passagers
- Claude Bolling, Eric Demarsan - Music Box
The Music of Hans Zimmer: The Definitive Collection
- Hans Zimmer - Silva
New York Chiama Superdrago
 - Benedetto Ghiglia - Digitmovies
Open Windows
- Jorge Magaz - Quartet
Vulcano Figlio Di Giove
 - Marcello Giombini - Kronos


THIS WEEK IN FILM MUSIC HISTORY

July 4 - Larry Herbstritt born (1950)
July 5 - Jerry Fielding's score for the Star Trek episode "Spectre of the Gun" is recorded (1968)
July 6 - Hanns Eisler born (1898)
July 6 - John Ottman born (1964)
July 6 - Ron Goodwin begins recording his score to Force 10 from Navarone (1978)
July 6 - John Williams begins recording his score for Superman (1978)
July 6 - Frank Cordell died (1980)
July 7 - Johnny Mandel begins recording his score for Point Blank (1967)
July 7 - Gerald Fried's score for the Star Trek episode "Friday's Child" is recorded (1967)
July 7 - Recording sessions begin on James Newton Howard's score for The Fugitive (1993)
July 8 - Bob Alcivar born (1938)
July 8 - Jay Chattaway born (1946)
July 8 - John Addison records his score for the Amazing Stories episode "The Pumpkin Competition" (1986)
July 9 - Richard Hageman born (1882)
July 9 - Earle Hagen born (1919)
July 9 - Paul Chihara born (1938)
July 9 - Harald Kloser born (1956)
July 9 - Conrad Salinger died (1961)
July 9 - Jerry Fielding begins recording his score for The Outfit (1973)
July 9 - James Horner records his score for the Amazing Stories episode "Alamo Jobe"(1985)
July 10 - Georges Delerue begins recording his score for The Pick-Up Artist (1987)


DID THEY MENTION THE MUSIC?

CODE BLACK - James Lavino

"Resident turned filmmaker Ryan McGarry sometimes displays shrewd instincts for hardheaded vérité -- there’s compelling stuff here, even if you shear away his occasional stabs at issues of bureaucratic overcrowding and corporate cost-cutting at the expense of intimacy. But elsewhere, there’s too much gloopy piano music underscoring the interviews; he could use this doc as a calling card for a gig on 'Grey’s Anatomy.'"

Joshua Rothkopf, Time Out New York

SNOWPIERCER - Marco Beltrami

"This is Bong Joon-ho's first feature film made outside South Korea, and he proves here that he can work competently with an international cast and crew. His cinematographer Hong Kyeong-pho does a terrific job of providing different moods, Steve M. Choe's editing is sharp and efficient and Marco Beltrami's score is solid while never stepping out of the line."

Seongyong Cho, RogerEbert.com

"Among the generally impeccable craft contributions -- including composer Marco Beltrami’s excitingly big, brassy original score -- only the fully CGI exterior shots of the Snowpiercer itself disappoint, with an overly animated feel that lacks the texture and verisimilitude of the best modern vfx work."

Scott Foundas, Variety

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION - Steve Jablonsky

"Everything about Michael Bay’s fourth 'Transformers' movie is too much. Its 165 minute running time. Its convoluted plot. Its deafening score. Its product placement. Its never-ending action scenes. Its swooping camera work. Its overwhelming stupidity. Well before it finished I was numb from its bludgeoning excess."

Dave McGinn, The Globe and Mail

"And then comes 95 minutes' worth of explosions, shattering glass, and the spectacle of what it looks and sounds like when the steel flesh is ripped from living, breathing skyscrapers, all accompanied by composer Steve Jablonsky's musical score of diarrheic robot farts and Bay's apparently still festering amusement over what minorities look like when they're running away from scary sh*t."

Eric Henderson, Slant Magazine

"The acoustics range from clanging and banging to a score by Steve Jablonsky that sounds as if he was twirling a knob on electronic trumpets between points marked 'mournful' and 'triumphal.'"

Peter Howell, Toronto Star

"Distractions, meanwhile, abound, whether they’re music-heavy slow-motion sequences that look reminiscent of 'CSI: Miami' or absurd product placement. The lingering close-up of a Beats Pill speaker is especially egregious."

Stephanie Merry, Washington Post

"The most touching moment in Michael Bay’s new Transformers movie takes place in the prologue. A cute dinosaur looks up at a giant spaceship that resembles an angry, glowing mollusk. The little guy’s eyes fill with awe, then terror as the vessel unleashes a barrage of explosions, stampeding all his dinosaur friends and blasting them to cinders. My heart went out to the critter, CGI figment though it was, knowing that once he was gone, no one else would evince as much pathos. Then, I thought, could Bay be alluding to Terrence Malick’s 'Tree of Life,' or maybe Disney’s 'Fantasia'? Sorry, just kidding. Just bracing myself for 165 minutes of explosions, car chases, cars turning into robots, images of cars, robots, and tiny human figures spinning in slow motion after an explosion or a car chase, ludicrous bathos, tight shots looking up Nicola Peltz’s tiny shorts, stentorian sound effects, cheap Wagnerian music, all shot and edited as if by a Cuisinart. In short, the cinematic equivalent of being tied in a bag and being beaten by pipes."

Peter Keogh, Boston Globe

"Hello, police? I’d like to report an assault. Where? Down at the MegaGigaGrandePlex, and it’s still going on. Come quick! I barely escaped with my life. The perp? Michael Bay. He gave me a full-body beatdown. His weapon? 'Transformers: Age of Extinction.' My poor eardrums were pounded to mush by nonstop hammering music and the wall-shaking sounds of endless explosions. Worse yet, they were terribly tortured by lines of dialogue like, 'Dad! There’s a missile in the family room!' And 'Sweetie, get my alien gun!'"

Soren Andersen, The Seattle Times

"That visual overkill extends to even the shorter scenes of individual bot-to-bot combat, and several haphazardly staged car chases appear to have been inserted to satisfy the auto lovers in the audience. The aggressive sensory assault is borne out by the breakneck editing of William Goldenberg, Roger Barton and Paul Rubell, and also by the score by Bay’s regular composer, Steve Jablonsky, which achieves a thundering majesty whenever the Autobots make a dramatic entrance, but is otherwise drowned out by the din of the Dolby Atmos sound mix."

Maggie Lee, Variety

"True, the film never actually shows the jets being dispatched to fight: 'Age of Extinction' is, like all the other 'Transformers' films, not about details but about the grand scheme of things. Its grandiose mission statement is, 'The biggest robots fighting the biggest fights' -- and it does the job by reducing everything to a drone. Aurally, Steve Jablonsky's nearly omnipresent musical score merges with the sounds of CGI pyrotechnics in one giant cacophony. Visually, the product placements eventually begin to blur, and not even the glimpse of a Chinese bank's ATM in the middle of Texas or the meaningless scene of Joyce drinking a Chinese soft drink while being pursued by deadly killing machines comes as much of a surprise."

Clarence Tsui, Hollywood Reporter

YVES SAINT LAURENT - Ibrahim Maalouf

"If there’s one thing that 'Yves Saint Laurent' makes perfectly clear, it’s that haute couture depends on finding the right model for the dress, and not the right dress for the model. While the eponymous designer is remembered as an eventual champion of ready-to-wear fashion, Lespert recounts his legacy with ready-to-wear filmmaking, sewing a story onto a life that it doesn’t fit and can’t contain. It’s a shame that Thomas Hardmeier’s gorgeous cinematography only compounds the identity crisis; the film is shot in a lushstyle that serves its Oscar chances more than it does its subject. (No such complaints about the loose piano score from Lebanese jazz prodigy Ibrahim Maalouf, who graces the material with a delicate wistfulness.)"

David Ehrlich, The Onion AV Club

"The fact Swiss director of photography Thomas Hardmeier and ace production designer Aline Bonetto had just collaborated on Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s 'The Young and Prodigious T.S. Spivet' ensures that their work is fully synced, and the rich contributions of costume designer Madeline Fontaine, who has frequently worked with Bonetto, further reinforce the impression that the visual aspects of the film are all very finely calibrated. Ibrahim Maalouf’s score occasionally dares to go for baroque or broke, lending an operatic quality to the proceedings that suits the material."

Boyd van Hoeij, Hollywood Reporter


THE NEXT TEN DAYS IN L.A.

Screenings of older films, at the following L.A. movie theaters: AMPASAmerican Cinematheque: AeroAmerican Cinematheque: EgyptianArclightLACMANew BeverlyNuartSilent Movie Theater and UCLA.

July 4
COME BACK TO THE 5 & DIME, JIMMY DEAN, JIMMY DEAN, THE GREAT GATSBY (Nelson Riddle) [New Beverly]
RETURN TO OZ (David Shire) [Nuart]
2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY [Cinematheque: Egyptian]

July 5
BURNT OFFERINGS (Robert Cobert) [New Beverly]
COME BACK TO THE 5 & DIME, JIMMY DEAN, JIMMY DEAN, THE GREAT GATSBY (Nelson Riddle) [New Beverly]
A HARD DAY'S NIGHT (The Beatles, George Martin) [Silent Movie Theater]
JAWS (John Williams) [Cinematheque: Aero]
LONESOME [Silent Movie Theater]
THE SHINING (Wendy Carlos, Rachel Elkind) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
STEEL DAWN (Brian May) [Silent Movie Theater]

July 6
A HARD DAY'S NIGHT (The Beatles, George Martin) [Silent Movie Theater]

July 7
A HARD DAY'S NIGHT (The Beatles, George Martin) [Silent Movie Theater]
SIXTEEN CANDLES (Ira Newborn) [Arclight Hollywood]

July 8
THE ASSASSINATION OF JESSE JAMES BY THE COWARD ROBERT FORD (Nick Cave, Warren Ellis) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
A HARD DAY'S NIGHT (The Beatles, George Martin) [Silent Movie Theater]
MARY POPPINS (Richard M. Sherman, Robert B. Sherman, Irwin Kostal) [LACMA]
VALLEY GIRL [Arclight Hollywood]

July 9
AMERICAN PIE (David Reynolds), AMERICAN REUNION (Lyle Workman) [New Beverly]
A HARD DAY'S NIGHT (The Beatles, George Martin) [Silent Movie Theater]
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL (Klaus Badelt) [Arclight Hollywood]
THE PROPOSITION (Nick Cave, Warren Ellis) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]

July 10
AMERICAN PIE (David Reynolds), AMERICAN REUNION (Lyle Workman) [New Beverly]
DELIVERANCE [Arclight Sherman Oaks]
A HARD DAY'S NIGHT (The Beatles, George Martin) [Silent Movie Theater]

July 11
THE CHANGELING (Ken Wannberg, Rich Wilkins) [Silent Movie Theater]
FEAR AND LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS (Ray Cooper), WHERE THE BUFFALO ROAM (Neil Young) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
IN COLD BLOOD (Quincy Jones), THE NINTH CONFIGURATION (Barry DeVorzon) [Cinematheque: Aero]
MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER 3000: THE MOVIE (Billy Barber) [Nuart]
NYMPHOMANIAC VOL. 1, NYMPHOMANIAC VOL. 2 [New Beverly]
SHE'S GOTTA HAVE IT (Bill Lee), BAMBOOZLED (Terence Blanchard) [LACMA/AMPAS]
TWENTY YEARS LATER (Rogerio Rossini) [UCLA]

July 12
ABC OF A STRIKE, INTERMISSIONS [UCLA]
THE CABIN IN THE WOODS (David Julyan)[New Beverly]
ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (Jon Brion), HUMAN NATURE (Graeme Revell) [Cinematheque: Aero]
NYMPHOMANIAC VOL. 1, NYMPHOMANIAC VOL. 2 [New Beverly]
SHORT CIRCUIT 2 (Charles Fox) [Silent Movie Theater]

July 13
BAD 25 [AMPAS]
EL ALCALDE (Daniel Hidalgo) [UCLA]
GOON (Ramachandra Borchar) [Silent Movie Theater]
IS THE MAN WHO IS TALL HAPPY?, DAVE CHAPPELLE'S BLOCK PARTY (Cory Smith) [Cinematheque: Aero]
LONGTIME COMPANION (Greg DeBelles) [UCLA]
VALLEY OF THE DOLLS (John Williams, Andre Previn), THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS (Christopher Komeda) [Cinematheque: Egyptian]
VOYAGE TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA (Paul Sawtell, Bert Shefter), MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (Bernard Herrmann) [New Beverly]

Return to Articles Author Profile
Comments (0):Log in or register to post your own comments
There are no comments yet. Log in or register to post your own comments
Film Score Monthly Online
The Twilight of the Ring
A Most Exciting Year for Alex Ebert
Selma: The Sound of Struggle
Lord of the Rings: Art for Ascension, Decline and Evil Times, Part 1
Director Commentary: The Theory of Everything
50 Years of Goldfinger
With Regards: Scoring Susan Sontag
Wong’s Turn: The Songs Outshine the Scores - 2014 Memo to the Academy Music Branch
Switched on Stanley: Classical Kubrick
Score Restore: A Clockwork Orange
Concert Review: La Magie et la Maîtrise
Ear of the Month Contest: Famous Westerns
Today in Film Score History:
December 21
Frank Cordell begins recording his score to Mosquito Squadron (1968)
Goldfinger opens in New York (1964)
Matthieu Chabrol born (1956)
Miklos Rozsa begins recording his score for Something of Value (1956)
Thunderball opens in New York (1965)
FSMO Featured Video
Video Archive • Audio Archive
Podcasts
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.