Film Score Monthly
Screen Archives Entertainment 250 Golden and Silver Age Classics on CD from 1996-2013! Exclusive distribution by SCREEN ARCHIVES ENTERTAINMENT.
Wild Bunch, The King Kong: The Deluxe Edition (2CD) Body Heat Friends of Eddie Coyle/Three Days of the Condor, The It's Alive Ben-Hur Nightwatch/Killer by Night Gremlins Space Children/The Colossus of New York, The
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
LOG IN
Forgot Login?
Register
Search Archives
Film Score Friday
Latest Edition
Previous Edition
Archive Edition
The Aisle Seat
Latest Edition
Previous Edition
Archive Edition
View Mode
Regular | Headlines
All times are PT (Pacific Time), U.S.A.
Site Map
Visits since
February 5, 2001:
14916936
© 2017 Film Score Monthly.
All Rights Reserved.
Keyword:   Label: 
  Section:  Author:
Month:   Year:  
NEXT 10 >>   
Aisle Seat 7-25: Summer Sizzler Edition
Posted By: Andy Dursin 7/24/2017 - 9:00 PM
Christopher Nolan’s new film DUNKIRK (**½, 107 mins., PG-13) is likely to divide viewers into two camps: those who feel the picture is a brilliant piece of cinema, and everybody else. Despite the mostly positive reviews, I regrettably found myself in the latter camp as this clinical “immersive viewing experience” played itself out.
Comments: 1  (read on)
Aisle Seat 7-18: 4K Summer Rundown
Posted By: Andy Dursin 7/17/2017 - 9:00 PM
When you get right down it, for a pop-culture icon like King Kong, it’s surprising that the Big Ape hasn’t had a whole lot of cinematic success. Sure, the 1933 RKO original is an all-time masterwork, but you can’t say the same about its hastily produced sequel “Son of Kong,” its decent – if not somewhat overlooked – 1976 Dino DeLaurentiis remake, or that version’s own, terrible follow-up “King Kong Lives.” A pair of ‘60s Toho productions brought Kong to Japan – including a silly skirmish with Godzilla – and the best you can say about them is that they’re at least more fun than Peter Jackson’s self-indulgent 2005 remake of the original, which was both miscast and painfully overlong.
Comments: 0  (read on)
Aisle Seat 7-11: Species, Warner Archive Wrap
Posted By: Andy Dursin 7/10/2017 - 9:00 PM
Like a lot of successful screenwriters who get their first crack at directing their own Hollywood movie, Oscar-winner John Patrick Shanley’s romantic-comedy JOE VERSUS THE VOLCANO (***, 102 mins., 1990, PG; Warner Archive) turned out to be overly self-indulgent and too “out there” for many viewers. However, those who were able to buy into the film’s light, fairy tale atmosphere were rewarded with a unique and engaging comic fantasy that has attracted a cult following since its original release.
Comments: 4  (read on)
Aisle Seat 7-4: A Fourth of July Special
Posted By: Andy Dursin 7/3/2017 - 9:00 PM
When it premiered as a one-shot NBC special on September 9th, 1967, ROWAN & MARTIN’S LAUGH-IN broke new ground on television. Viewers had scarcely seen such a rapid-fire comic anthology on TV before, and the hour-long program was the right show at the right time in the turbulent late ‘60s. “Laugh-In” was timely, motivated by generation-gap/culture-clash jokes, the hippie movement, and provided the right tonic for audiences looking to laugh while the country was embroiled in numerous struggles socially, politically and militarily. Ratings for the initial special were strong, leading to a weekly series that aired on Mondays at 8pm starting in January of ‘68 – a time slot the series would occupy until it signed off, finally, in May of 1973.
Comments: 1  (read on)
Aisle Seat 6-27: A Pink Panther Celebration
Posted By: Andy Dursin 6/26/2017 - 9:00 PM
Despite being one of its more lucrative commercial properties, MGM seemingly held on to the Blu-Ray rights of “The Pink Panther” series for many years, resulting in everything except the original “Panther” bypassing the high-definition format. After years of speculation and rumored releases, the series – all of it – is finally out on Blu-Ray for the first time this week, via separate efforts from Shout! Factory and Kino Lorber.
Comments: 0  (read on)
Aisle Seat 6-20: 1492, June Horrors
Posted By: Andy Dursin 6/19/2017 - 9:00 PM
In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue. In 1992, two big-budget movies sank like a stone at the global box-office, failing completely to find an audience as the world celebrated – more or less – the 500th anniversary of the discovery of the New World. The two competing pictures – Ridley Scott’s expensive 1492: CONQUEST OF PARADISE and Alexander Salkind’s “Christopher Columbus: The Discovery” – were heralded at Cannes as far back as 1989, when the Salkind picture was first announced.
Comments: 0  (read on)
Aisle Seat 6-13: Lawnmower Man, Shout June Wrap
Posted By: Andy Dursin 6/12/2017 - 9:00 PM
For reasons I still don’t understand, THE LAWNMOWER MAN (108/141 mins., 1992, R) opened in Rhode Island during February 1992, several weeks ahead of the rest of the nation. Even the Boston Globe’s review, from a critic who was sent south to cover the film, mentioned this oddball fact, enabling those of us in the Ocean State to brag about seeing the Pierce Brosnan/Jeff Fahey virtual reality thriller before everyone else. If only social media was prevalent back in the early ‘90s, we could’ve also warned the movie-going public to avoid this goofy turkey, which nevertheless managed to gross a potent $30 million on a budget that threw nearly all of its funding behind then-cutting edge CGI animation.
Comments: 0  (read on)
Aisle Seat 6-6: Wonder Woman, 4K Wrap
Posted By: Andy Dursin 6/5/2017 - 9:00 PM
The fact that we haven’t had many female super-hero flicks makes WONDER WOMAN (***, 143 mins., PG-13) a novelty by itself – and within the parameters of the genre, this lavish DC Comics adventure is a sturdy and well-made fantasy that pits the Amazon Princess against the German forces of WWI…or, to be more precise, Aries, the God of War, whom Diana (Gal Godot) believes is the source of all of mankind’s horrifying military struggles.
Comments: 0  (read on)
Aisle Seat 5-30: Memorial Day Edition
Posted By: Andy Dursin 5/29/2017 - 9:00 PM
For a studio that must have dollar bills plastered all over its walls, it’s disappointing how poorly Walt Disney has treated its live-action back catalog, particularly on Blu-Ray. The studio that once broke away from “kiddie product” to form Touchstone Pictures back in the mid 1980s has absolutely turned its back on that mission from decades ago, eschewing “adult fare” for a steady diet of animated films, Marvel comic-book flicks, and Star Wars sequels. That has left a void in the care of its box-office hits that weren’t aimed at little tykes, with even blockbuster smashes like “Three Men and a Baby” – the singular highest-grossing film of 1987 – still never having been released in widescreen on home video at all, much less Blu-Ray.
Comments: 0  (read on)
Aisle Seat 5-23: Kino Lorber May Mania
Posted By: Andy Dursin 5/22/2017 - 9:00 PM
A strange sequel that’s half “Alien” rehash and half “Prometheus” follow-up – albeit with none of the latter’s “bigger questions” actually being addressed – Ridley Scott’s ALIEN: COVENANT (**½, 123 mins., 2017, R) serves up a serviceable but ultimately unsatisfying ride over narrative terrain we’ve covered many times over by now.
Comments: 1  (read on)
NEXT 10 >>
Film Score Monthly Online
Professor XL
Hart to Heart
A Wild Wild Box Set
Isham Tech
Blonde Ambition
Wong's Turn: Tracked Music, Part 2
Score Restore: Sphinx
Ear of the Month Contest: Craig Safan, Vol. 1
Gold Rush: The Jazzy Bank Teller
Today in Film Score History:
July 27
Alex North begins recording his score to The Outrage (1964)
Bernard Herrmann records the Piano Concerto for the Hangover Square score (1944)
Georges Delerue records his score for Exposed (1982)
Harry Lubin died (1977)
Jerome Moross died (1983)
Marc Wilkinson born (1929)
Max Steiner begins recording his score for Those Callaways (1964)
Michael Linn born (1952)
Miklos Rozsa died (1995)
Stefan Nilsson born (1955)
FSMO Featured Video
Video Archive • Audio Archive
Podcasts
© 2017 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.