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 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 10:21 AM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

Some of you guys really need to lighten up. Why get so upset over freakin' track titles when there are so many other things in life that could cause you outrage?

The kind of comment that the thumbs up sign was invented for. What's more annoying - having fun with track titles or giving away key plot points in track titles (coughJohnWilliamscough)?

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 11:00 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

As far as life outside film music, there are other message boards out there. You should see the forum for Pogs. Place is NUTS.

Because this is a film music board, disagreements about things like cutesy track titles that cheapen the art when used excessively are kinda what we do here. You don't have to agree, obviously.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 11:41 AM   
 By:   AlexCope   (Member)

I love this notion that I might be upset over these track titles. Please. I just think it's a tiresome trend and feeds into a mindset some have that film music isn't to be taken seriously. I mean, if at some point someone wants to have a serious discussion of Giacchino's career talking about specific pieces of music, it's going to consist of saying puns like How Bonobo Can You Go, or Close Encounters of the Furred Kind, or who can forget that standout finale Ain't That A Stinger?

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 11:52 AM   
 By:   TM   (Member)

I think Giacchino's track titles do a wonderful job of reminding us that it is the music that should be taken seriously, not what the piece is named or what movie it came from, what the case is made out of, what pictures are in the booklet, or what random people in liner notes or message boards have to say about the subjectivity of art.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 11:54 AM   
 By:   TM   (Member)

it's going to consist of saying puns like How Bonobo Can You Go, or Close Encounters of the Furred Kind, or who can forget that standout finale Ain't That A Stinger?

And Andy Warhol took photographs of soup cans. Your point?

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   David-R.   (Member)



I am OK with the puns, being given to them myself at times... but on the flip side, it's hard to for me to talk about a track that I really admire (i.e., "Carter They Come Carter They Fall") without getting at least a bit distracted by the title and having the person I'm talking to roll their eyes.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 1:01 PM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

This kind of thing that would have been maddening back when you only got 30-35 minutes from most scores. Not knowing what the hell cues were included on the album because none of the titles had anything to do with the scenes they were from would have pissed off a lot of us way more.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 1:26 PM   
 By:   AlexCope   (Member)

And Andy Warhol took photographs of soup cans. Your point?

What's your point? Andy Warhol's soup can photographs were kind of a clever joke in and of themselves and were named accordingly, like Campbell's Soup Cans. Giacchino will write a serious piece of music and call it Killer In-Stinks.

But it's an interesting question, at least to me anyway. How much is the title of something a part of the art? Film composers don't have control over the title of a film, but they can usually come up with track titles, so perhaps this is just a way to put some of their own personality into the thing. Fair enough. It's their music. But it can give an odd impression when it's overloaded with obvious puns.

I think Giacchino's track titles do a wonderful job of reminding us that it is the music that should be taken seriously, not what the piece is named or what movie it came from, what the case is made out of, what pictures are in the booklet, or what random people in liner notes or message boards have to say about the subjectivity of art.

Clearly we're here about the music first and foremost, and I don't think anyone is saying that a title of something or liner notes or pictures or what other random people have to say is more important than that, but that doesn't mean these other things can't be part of the conversation. I mean, that's what we're here for, right? To talk about this stuff?

Speaking of the music, the live performance on the youtube video earlier in this topic sounded promising, especially the way it builds up there at the end. Looking forward to hearing it in better sound.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 2:11 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

yeah

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 2:11 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

yeah yeah

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 2:11 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

yeah yeah yeah

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 2:11 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

ok

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   Ant   (Member)

First world problems, eh.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

When I loaded stuff like John Carter and Lost to my mp3 player I re-named and edited most
of them anyway. While I do go back to the actual CDs now and then, in the most part, I'm now
more familiar with my own cue titles like No Gravity, Arena Battle and Big Fight/Flashback (from
John Carter). Do what I do and own the situation. There's no way any of those Apes titles will be
the ones I'm looking at when I'm getting to know the score.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 2:37 PM   
 By:   Erik Woods   (Member)

First world problems, eh.

No kidding!

-Erik-

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

No Gravity, Arena Battle and Big Fight/Flashback (from
John Carter). Do what I do and own the situation.


Ehh. I find the fun punny titles far more interesting than the boring vaguely descriptive ones. I do enjoy when they use lines of dialogue as track titles, though those sometimes get a little long.

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 3:41 PM   
 By:   SBD   (Member)

Ehh. I find the fun punny titles far more interesting than the boring vaguely descriptive ones.

Just imagine if Giacchino went down that boring route. Who among you wouldn't feel cheated? (Don't lie.)

 
 Posted:   Jun 26, 2014 - 11:16 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

I have no philosophical objection to Giacchino's pun titles. But boy, I have to say, when every single track has a pun, it gets pretty tiresome. And to be brutally honest, I think very, very few of them are actually amusing.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2014 - 6:11 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)


Just imagine if Giacchino went down that boring route. Who among you wouldn't feel cheated? (Don't lie.)


Just because not doing it wouldn't be an issue doesn't mean that doing it is bad though.

 
 Posted:   Jun 27, 2014 - 6:14 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

I have no philosophical objection to Giacchino's pun titles. But boy, I have to say, when every single track has a pun, it gets pretty tiresome. And to be brutally honest, I think very, very few of them are actually amusing.

This is where I'm coming from (as if anyone cares). At least when Don Davis would do it, it was a couple of tracks - this reads like a list of elementary school puns by the kid you use to throw wads of paper balls at during 7th grade health class.

 
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